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Case 1845 skidder

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  • Case 1845 skidder

    OT Prompted by misuer Fastracks exempliary trackhoe bucket it persuaded me to ask if any of you folks out there have any info on the quick hitch arrangement, i have no idea what its like yet as the machine wont arrive till tomorrow along with a tractor bucket apparently suitable for modding to fit.
    for that matter as a novice in the skid steer department [and many many others] if anyone has any skid steer gems to share! including what not to do!
    it was SWMBO's idea to buy it as she seems to be taking over the heavy metal department!
    also how do forks fit!
    regards
    mark
    http://i258.photobucket.com/albums/h.../uniloader.jpg
    Sorry i missed the OT in the title, and you cant edit, oh well learning all the time!
    Last edited by boslab; 11-11-2011, 08:26 PM.

  • #2
    Mark...on the top of the bucket lugs...that part hooks into an angle iron arrangement....then the bottom lugs fold into pockets....then the pins drop into holes on the bucket adapter plate and anchor the bucket. Very simple arrangement. Ive built several from scratch.
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

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    • #3
      I think you will find quite a difference in a "skidder" and a skid steer load which is what you have.
      http://www.hunttractor.com/skidders.htm

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by tdmidget
        I think you will find quite a difference in a "skidder" and a skid steer load which is what you have.
        http://www.hunttractor.com/skidders.htm
        wow see what you mean, thats one of them big log tugboats, i should have put skid steer i think
        thanks T i knew i could count on someone to explain it, next to the batcave/mancave to see what materials i have to make an adaptor for forks and bucket i'm glad i have some oxy and propane now, left the cylynder valve cracked on the last one and wasted a 1/2 size cylynder
        thanks
        mark

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi,

          Modding a bucket isn't too hard like torker said. It's pretty straight forward.

          Things to remember when running a skid-steer, carry the load as low as possible. They can be pretty tippy if you are careless or clueless. The short and narrow wheel base, while handy in tight quarters, does not lend itself to a lot of stability. Wear the flippin' seatbelt! As a new operator, you WILL be stupid and almost tip it, if not actually do so, at some point during your learning curve. It can toss you out and ruin your day by killing you. In 18 years of rural EMS, I've done 4 skid-steer accidents. Might not sound like much, but all could have been totally prevented by wearing the seatbelt.

          Because of the short, narrow wheel base and lack of counter-weights, I don't like fork-lift mods to them. Skid-steers don't have much for counter-weights and forks tend to place the load too far out front for safe operation. Resist the temptation to mount a bigger bucket. Again, the machine is easy to tip and the buckets that are fitted to the machine from factory are as big as it is safe to have for general work.

          Wheeled skid-steers also tend to not be the best thing in the mud and do much better on hard surfaces. They have low ground clearance and the tires are relatively small. This is why construction types have tracks rather than wheels. They still have poor ground clearance, but the tracks give better flotation on soft surfaces.

          All-in-all, though, skid-steers are darned handy and a useful machine to own.

          dalee
          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

          Comment


          • #6
            I owned a Bobcat 843B a couple of years ago when I lived on Texada Island, sold it when I moved back to Victoria. I had backhoe and postpounder attachments as well as buckets. Wanted, but never got forks. A couple more pointers:

            Partly to keep things balanced when you are carrying a load, the engine (and center of weight) is in the rear, pretty much directly over (in my case slightly behind) the rear wheels. This means that when you are NOT carrying a load (and often even when you are), you most definitely do not want to try to go up a steep slope in forward, only in reverse, or you are liable to flip over backwards.

            Don't walk under the arms when they are in the raised position unless they are locked with a locking device. If you lose hydraulic pressure they can descend like a guillotine (or trip hammer, depending on what's attached). (You can make a not-approved-by-the-munfacturer locking device by slitting a length of steel pipe lengthwise so that it fits over the shaft, but butts against the cylinder at one end and the frame at the other end. At your own risk. ;-) )

            Don't know about Case, but for many years Bobcat recommended using plain old 10W30 (or 30?) motor oil for hydraulic fluid. Now they want you to buy the expensive stuff, but I'm pretty sure most people don't.

            There is, of course, a SkidSteer forum

            There are approximately a gazzillion and one attachments for these things, some of which you'll probably want to build, and all of which you'll probably want to have.

            Have fun!
            "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by mickeyf
              I owned a Bobcat 843B a couple of years ago when I lived on Texada Island, sold it when I moved back to Victoria. I had backhoe and postpounder attachments as well as buckets. Wanted, but never got forks. A couple more pointers:

              Partly to keep things balanced when you are carrying a load, the engine (and center of weight) is in the rear, pretty much directly over (in my case slightly behind) the rear wheels. This means that when you are NOT carrying a load (and often even when you are), you most definitely do not want to try to go up a steep slope in forward, only in reverse, or you are liable to flip over backwards.

              Don't walk under the arms when they are in the raised position unless they are locked with a locking device. If you lose hydraulic pressure they can descend like a guillotine (or trip hammer, depending on what's attached). (You can make a not-approved-by-the-munfacturer locking device by slitting a length of steel pipe lengthwise so that it fits over the shaft, but butts against the cylinder at one end and the frame at the other end. At your own risk. ;-) )

              Don't know about Case, but for many years Bobcat recommended using plain old 10W30 (or 30?) motor oil for hydraulic fluid. Now they want you to buy the expensive stuff, but I'm pretty sure most people don't.

              There is, of course, a SkidSteer forum

              There are approximately a gazzillion and one attachments for these things, some of which you'll probably want to build, and all of which you'll probably want to have.

              Have fun!
              Ooops i already tried going up a steep bank foreward, with no bucket, oooh crap i'm looking at the sky lol, i managed to recover the situation thankfully, I didnt realise how big the thing was till it arrived, its a wide ol beasty, but bloody great fun!
              thanks
              mark

              Comment


              • #8
                BOSLAB - It will be bloody great fun once you learn to operate it,

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