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  • #16
    Thanks Evan,
    Trudy and I are very thankful. It turned out much better than it could have. I hear you got some snow yesterday.
    Dave

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    • #17
      It's snowing right now too. We have had several centimetres this AM. I should get off my butt and do something productive. You are very fortunate it turned out as it did. It would be terrible to have found out differently. Were I in your position I would find some random act of kindness to perform, you have some karma to pay back.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #18
        Evan,
        Yes I am working on that.
        Thanks
        Dave

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        • #19
          The wheel bearing/ hub&bearing assembly will probably give up real soon also.
          Listen for a low pitch roar that gets louder when you turn one direction or another.
          Joe

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          • #20
            I was riding in the back seat coming back from a visit 3 or 4 hours away- our driver was tired (we all were) and didn't see the rock in the road ahead. I did from the back seat, but not in time to prevent him from clipping it. Both front and back wheels on that side of the car got mangled, but the tires stayed up. Aluminum rims were toast. I don't think there's much you can, or should do to repair them.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #21
              I do not trust aluminum alloy wheels. Our Jeep Patriot came with a set off the lot so I bought a set of steel wheels for winter driving. It makes it easy to change the tires for winter but more importantly, steel doesn't fail like aluminum. In summer you can inspect an aluminum wheel after a curb swipe or similar but when the wheel is packed to the rims with ice, snow and mud it's a different story.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #22
                I know I will never look at cast aluminum wheels the same again, One of the workers ran loose lugs on one of my bro's smaller work trucks and it wallowed out the bolt pattern slightly - so I told him Id throw it on the mill and indicate it and punch in the bolt hole pattern and bring it back around and I did just that - only three were just a clean up and two took about .020" of depth to clean up,

                I had the tire mounted back on and when I threw the wheel back on the truck I could not get the lugs fully tightened - at first I did not know what was happening - some of the lugs tensioned fully up and a couple would not - when I removed the lugs on the ones that didn't I was shocked - they had sunken into the rims material - Exoskeleton is the word I would use to describe these wheels - and once that outer structure is breached your riding on cheesecorn...

                Not all aluminum wheels are created equal though - the aftermarket ones on my honda are tough as nails - one got severely bent - really bad - and I thought I knew by past experience that there was no way it was going to straighten without cracking as I had one with 1/10th the bend on another honda and the first hit trying to bring it back cracked it ---

                well - after about 500 dead serious sledge hammer blows with a delrin cushion between I got the rim fully straightened and there is no apparent weakness to it or cracking - no I don't trust it like it never happened and of course it has to be slightly weaker but it really amazed me to the point were you would think the wheel was machined from a solid billet but it's not - its cast...

                iv also got a new respect for delrin --- while Iv seen it crack happy on the lathe and all this little piece took an out and out spanking,
                I remember along time ago trying to warn Evan not to use it on his shaper drive - I probably stand corrected...

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                • #23
                  We've repaired quite a few aluminum wheels in our time but one that bad would be a no go. Never be safe again.

                  Anybody else on here from the Valley?
                  Keith
                  __________________________
                  Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                  • #24
                    Which valley? Fraser Valley?
                    I am from Surrey, Darryl is Chilliwack area. Black Moon is I think Mission area.
                    Dave

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                    • #25
                      I'm in Chimney Valley.
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #26
                        A sideways slide into a curb will cause that kind of damage. My ex did just that at 25 mph in the rain. She slid sideways into the curb as she rounded a corner.

                        Damage was impressive. Both right tires popped. Both rims trashed, one totally separated from the hub all the way around. The transmission was trashed by the jackshaft which punched through the other side.

                        Modern wheels are remarkable in that they are so fragile and yet support so much weight and resist such stress.

                        Dan
                        At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                        • #27
                          Before everyone paints aluminum wheels with the same brush.
                          Please bare in mind there is a huge difference in strength and ductability between a conventional automotive cast wheel and a heavy duty forged aluminum wheel.

                          Virtually no comparison.
                          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                          • #28
                            Not to mention that not all aluminum wheels are made from aluminum. Some are magnesium and some are a magnesium/aluminum alloy. We used to call them Mag Wheels when I was young.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #29
                              Wheels

                              Originally posted by Willy
                              Before everyone paints aluminum wheels with the same brush.
                              Please bare in mind there is a huge difference in strength and ductability between a conventional automotive cast wheel and a heavy duty forged aluminum wheel.

                              Virtually no comparison.
                              Ask any truck driver what their rims take in comparason to car / suv rims.

                              I wont run any alloy rims on my service vehicles as they currently availabe crap breaks up in about a week .

                              Michael

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                              • #30
                                In the UK its illegal to run a trailer with alloy wheels on public roads.
                                MBB

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