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  • #31
    I've repaired some cast rims before, some being aluminum weld up real nice and others that are either magnesium or a mixture of both tend not to weld as clean. But...... I would never attempt to repai such extensive damage like that. Most of the repairs I've done were small cosmetic dings and gouges.

    JL.................

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    • #32
      Even if you managed to repair it, I wouldn't trust it.

      "A weld is just a casting"

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      • #33
        right -- besides the fact that it would never be as strong (not that it looks like it was that strong to begin with)
        after all the material added and time and then machining and then re-adding material where the blemishes are and then re-machining you end up with a weaker $750.00 rim as compared to just going out and buying a new $100.00 one... just don't make "cents"

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        • #34
          I like aluminum wheels and have them on everything. Just don't go running into things and they hold up just fine.
          Andy

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          • #35
            I suggest you search on ford aluminum wheel cracks.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #36
              I repair alloy wheels for one of the tyre chains in this area, don't do many probably 1 or 2 at most a month.
              I only weld cracks in the rims or small missing bits, refuse to do anything bigger.

              Other than looks can't under stand the fetish with alloys. There is a body shop literally across the road from me and they often pop over with small jobs.

              Came over a while ago and asked if I could bore the centre out on an Audi wheel as the new ones were 3mm smaller than the originals and the originals are no longer made, you have to buy the matching hub.
              OK so this guy walks over bent double carrying this wheel, I thought he was messing about until I picked it up, weighed a bloody ton, in fact it was heavier than some of the steel truck rims I work on.
              900 UKP per wheel to boot, so what advantage is there in that ? heavier and more costly than steel ?
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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              • #37
                Originally posted by Evan
                I suggest you search on ford aluminum wheel cracks.

                Didn't find much. Just a few people talking about cracks. Nothing out of the norm.
                Andy

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by John Stevenson
                  I repair alloy wheels for one of the tyre chains in this area, don't do many probably 1 or 2 at most a month.
                  I only weld cracks in the rims or small missing bits, refuse to do anything bigger.

                  Other than looks can't under stand the fetish with alloys. There is a body shop literally across the road from me and they often pop over with small jobs.

                  Came over a while ago and asked if I could bore the centre out on an Audi wheel as the new ones were 3mm smaller than the originals and the originals are no longer made, you have to buy the matching hub.
                  OK so this guy walks over bent double carrying this wheel, I thought he was messing about until I picked it up, weighed a bloody ton, in fact it was heavier than some of the steel truck rims I work on.
                  900 UKP per wheel to boot, so what advantage is there in that ? heavier and more costly than steel ?

                  Steel wheels rust. Our plow truck has a leaking wheel right now that is pissing me off.

                  Most of the time aluminum wheels are lighter and they always look better then steel.
                  Andy

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Evan
                    I suggest you search on ford aluminum wheel cracks.

                    First thing that came up with your search.

                    http://www.ncfma.org/news/2010/03/22...el-rimswheels/
                    Andy

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                    • #40
                      im with the majority on this one but with exception --- like Willy stated - not all aluminum wheels are created equal, some are indeed outright brittle junk

                      but the aluminum wheels I have right now have instilled a ton of confidence in me when I went to straighten them -------- they are resilient as can be - they are also very very strong - they only got bent cuz they where being run with 40 series tires and hit a 4" to 5" straight cut bone rattleling shelf in the middle of the road at nighttime.


                      as far as un-sprung weight wheels are crucial in suspension compression and return rates - but they are also even more critical in the energies to accelerate and decelerate them - wheel weight takes twice the energies to get moving and twice the friction energies to stop.

                      it's why you will never see steel wheels on a Ferrari
                      and the quality alloy ones seem to hold up just fine @ 200mph + with ground effects and enough G-forces to make you wish you had put velcro on your chewing gum

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                      • #41
                        You missed this page. The subject of the page is only Ford Wheels. Many of the reports are alloy wheel cracks, hundreds of them. Many of them are for cracking spokes, sometimes on all 4 wheels at once.

                        A small sample: They are in semi date order, oldest first. This problem has been going on for a long time.


                        FORD Wheels
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 1. this is the second time that a wheel has deveolped a crack in one of its spokes. 2. a bolt tha More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 2000 4r100 transmission had problems since 33602 miles hard shifting into 3-4 and was told every thing wa More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 Aluminium wheels have a crack on the passengers side wheel. *ak More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 Aluminium wheels have cracks in them. dealer notified.*ak *tt More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 Both front wheels have cracks in the ford manufactured spook wheels. ford contacted and had no expl More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 Casting on alloy wheels failed. of seven spokes on wheels three had broken. wheels were falling More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 Dt*: the contact stated the front wheels on the vehicle cracked. this was noticed from a visual in More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1996 During a brake inspection at a tire store, it was pointed out that the original aluminum wheels were More
                        AEROSTAR FORD AEROSTAR 1994 Left rear alloy wheel was cracked within one of the spokes. dealer/manufacturer notified, and infor More
                        http://car-and-safety.com/ford-wheels.htm
                        Last edited by Evan; 11-13-2011, 01:57 PM.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #42
                          Auto makers are known to have MASS problems with certain parts all the time. The manufacturer made the aluminum wheels crack, not the aluminum.
                          Andy

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                          • #43
                            ????

                            I like aluminum wheels and have them on everything. Just don't go running into things and they hold up just fine.

                            The point is that they don't hold up just fine. I don't care what they are made from or whose fault it is. Aluminum wheels have a safety problem. The problem is very much aggravated if conditions don't allow an easy visual inspection, which was the case in this instance and is a universal problem in this climate.

                            Running into things on the road is a fact of life. When there is a safer, cheaper and long proven product widely available it doesn't make sense to intentionally use something that is less safe and more expensive. Aluminum wheels are a safety hazard. If they were only a safety hazard to the driver AND the driver is well informed, that would be acceptable. But, they pose a hazard to everyone on the road and almost nobody is well informed of the hazard.

                            Aluminum wheels can be made as safe as steel wheels but then they cost far more. There isn't a good excuse for reducing the safety of the general public strictly to save money and sell cars.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #44
                              There is no problem. I would say more then 50% of vehicles now days have aluminum wheels and there are very few problems.

                              What is a safety issue is the use of steel brake lines that rust and randomly take away all braking when they blow. That is a safety issue.
                              Andy

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                              • #45
                                It makes no sense to tar the entire field of alloy wheels with the same brush. My aluminum wheels are likely to be a totally different design than what someone else has.

                                Saying 'Aluminum wheels have a safety problem' is like saying "Steel rims are safe". That is, of course, unless someone can point to a metallurgical deficiency in Aluminum as a metal, and can then show that all aluminum rims use the same alloy.

                                A well designed alloy rim can be lighter and as usable as it's steel counterpart. Less unsprung weight can lead to a smoother ride and better handling. It might be worthwhile to buy something different if you drive in odd conditions where the stresses and wear factors favor one design over another.

                                The average driver can manage with less than perfect, even with manhole covers for tires.
                                ( http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/myth...fixing-a-flat/ )

                                Dan
                                At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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