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  • Generator help needed

    Just bought a Wen 5500 generator from someone who only used it a few times & last time it put out no power. It runs great, I took the cover off the generator end & everthing looks fine, no hot or burnt smell. What should I check? I have an idea it not ruined. Any help will be appriciated. Thanks! Eric
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  • #2
    I've had generators that sat without use, for long periods, that would not put out any power. I had to energize them with a 12 volt charge to get them working.

    The 2 I have done this to had a cover on the end away from the engine, there were a couple of metal tabs under it where I touched the pos and neg leads.

    I think these are alt. not really gen.

    THANX RICH

    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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    • #3
      Check for juice on the back side of the breakers first, then check the brushes. The brush holders are very easy to break. Don't ask how I know...
      IF you PM me your email, I'll send you the manual. I have that exact genny. I've been all the way through it. Got it in trade cuz the motor had an extra "vent hole". IF you need parts, call the 800 number on the sticker. They were very helpful and the parts are extremely cheap.

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      • #4
        Manual is on it's way....

        What you end up paying if you don't mind?

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        • #5
          $100 w/the 4 way plug cord. Probably used 3 times. Starts 1st pull. Do OK? Thanks for the manual!
          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
          country, in easy stages."
          ~ James Madison

          Comment


          • #6
            At $100 with a cord that can easily cost $100, you did REALLY well. Congrats. I'm sure you can get it to put out power with very little work, though apart from saying "check the circuit breaker and fuses" I'm not much help.

            I picked up a nearly-new Crapsman 5600w unit from a friend for over 3 times what you paid, and thought I did well. Mine needed to have the L14-30 socket wired back up, but with the manual showing the electrical schematic that was easy.

            I'd put off getting a generator for all my life until this friend casually mentioned he had one he'd be selling to get a bigger one. Normally I won't by ANYTHING with a Sears tag on it anywhere, for any price, but I just had a feeling about this. Sure enough two weeks after I got it we get nailed with the 16" of snow on Halloween and lose power for days. The noise was a little much, but a longer cord can fix that. Staying warm was cool.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by flylo
              $100 w/the 4 way plug cord. Probably used 3 times. Starts 1st pull. Do OK? Thanks for the manual!

              You did pretty good. Last time I checked, Menards was selling those generators for about $600.

              I traded about $175 worth of work for mine then spent $120 on parts to fix it. I figured I did good at about half of new price. Mine starts first pull too when I remember to turn on the fuel, choke, and kill switch. Otherwise it takes 2 or 3 pulls.

              Last edited by Boostinjdm; 11-13-2011, 02:12 PM.

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              • #8
                That's the one & it looks that good also. I'll call the monday. The kid said the told him about a reset under the end cover plate, he didn't find it bought a new one & sold it to me. The way of the world , buy a new one it's only money or credit.
                "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                country, in easy stages."
                ~ James Madison

                Comment


                • #9
                  Generators sometimes need to be re-flashed after having sat idle for prolonged periods.
                  Below is a simple way to accomplish this.


                  [quote]
                  This tip comes from the Briggs & Stratton Customer Education Department. As an alternative to flashing a rotor winding with a battery applied to the brushes, an electric drill may be used. Follow these steps to flash the generator:
                  • Plug the electric drill into the generator receptacle. (Cordless drills do not work)
                  • If the drill is reversible, move the direction switch to the forward position.
                  • Start the generator
                  • While depressing the trigger on the drill, spin the drill chuck in reverse direction. This will excite the field and the generator will now produce electricity. If spinning the chuck one direction does not work, try spinning the chuck in the other direction as you may have the reverse switch positioned backwards.
                  Use caution not to get your hand or other materials caught in the chuck. As soon as the field is excited, the generator will produce power and the drill will turn on.
                  The reason this works is because the electric motor in the drill will act as a small generator when spun backwards. The magnets in the drill's motor induce a voltage into the motor windings, which is fed back through the trigger, cord and into the generators receptacle. From there it goes into the power winding of the stator. The voltage going through the power winding creates a magnetic field, which is intensified due to the iron core of the stator laminations. The rotor intersects this magnetic field as it is spun past the power winding, thus inducing a voltage in the rotor winding. Once current flow is present in the rotor winding the rotor has been flashed.
                  If flashing the field does not make the generator work, you may have additional problems, besides a lack of magnetism in the rotor. Further testing will be needed. Hopefully, this will give a simple way to field flash your generator if needed - Bruce Perrault
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Willy]Generators sometimes need to be re-flashed after having sat idle for prolonged periods.


                    I don't have any proof, but my hunch is that this generator is excited by the engines charging system. I believe the pick up is that little yellow wire just behind the flywheel. IF that is in fact how it works, the cure could be as simple as a bad connection in that wire.

                    I'll take a look at mine when I get the chance.

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                    • #11
                      Yes by all means check the easy stuff first.
                      Without the basics in place and functional you can flash and re-flash until you're blue in the face without results.
                      As in any trouble shooting procedure always start with the simple stuff first.

                      Like checking to see if fuel is present in the tank before undergoing a series of complicated no-start diagnostic procedures.
                      Wish I had a buck every time that scenario has been played out.
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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