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Krazy Klockwork mechanism

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  • Krazy Klockwork mechanism

    Last year for my birthday, my daughter bought me this book, "507 Mechanical Movements" by Henry T Brown. Its been a month now since I finished my build of the Popcorn engine, and I've recovered enough to start thinking about another machining project. I am always on the lookout for amusing things to run with my various collection of model steam and gasoline engines, and I may have found another. The picture on the left has a neat looking SOMETHING!!! I don't really know what its called, but it kind of looks like a clockwork mechanism, thus my threads title. I really have nothing to go on here except for the picture, and a very brief explanation of how it works in the book. As the bar "C" rocks back and forth on pivot "A", the "arms" (for lack of a better word) engage the posts on the wheel "B" and give it an "Almost continuous rotation"-----At least thats what the book says. I'm thinking an aluminum wheel about 6" in diameter, with brass "posts". I will design it first in Solidworks, and post the drawings as I go along, as usual. Driven by a small steam engine, it ought to look pretty neat!!!----Brian
    Brian Rupnow

  • #2
    Wow!!! This is difficult! Not the modeling---that took 15 minutes. The math, and geometric relationships are a real brain teaser. Since I am only going by a picture, without knowing any of the geometric inter relationships between all the parts, I arbitrarily choose a wheel diameter and number of posts, then work outward from there. Its been a long day. I have been working 4 weeks straight now on an automated infeed system for a huge metal spinning lathe that spins 8" pipe at 2300 degrees F into oxygen bottles, and my brain is a bit fried. ;D ;D
    Brian Rupnow

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    • #3
      I THINK I got it.--Trouble is, there is no good way to animate all the movements in Solidworks, and thats a lot of metal to cut if I've got it wrong!!! I had to increase the diameter of the wheel to 7" instead of the original 6" to make room for the arms to "fall" to the next post properly. Actually, they don't fall right into place---The curved bottom portion of the arm falls onto the post, and rides on it as the wheel continues to rotate, pushed by the OTHER arm, untill the rounded hole in the bottom left end of the arm falls and engages the post. At that exact moment, the green arm reverses direction and the sequence repeats with the other arm. I think perhaps I will make it from cardboard and use stick-pins for my pivot points. One thing about doing that---If I have to move the stick-pin pivot points around a bit to make it work, I can measure the "moved" pivot points and fix up the model to match before making detail drawings. Another nice thing is that I can print my "parts" at 1:1 scale on 8 1/2" x 11" paper, and glue them to some cardboard to try this.
      Brian Rupnow

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      • #4
        These are the parts, printed out at one to one scale and glued to heavy cardboard, except for the wheel, which is glued to a scrap of 3/4" plywood. I used the plywood,because I realized that I would probably want to be able to install a dozen or so 1/4" "posts" in it. Tomorrow I will cut everything out, mount the pieces on a plywood backing, and possibly even glue some weights to the cardboard "arms" to make things function. The wheel is 7" diameter. The arms are 3 3/8" and 2 3/8" center to center. In a way, this seems too large, and I may want to scale it down to 75% of its current size, which would leave me with a 5 1/4" diameter wheel and 3/16" posts. However, first I want to make it work, and then if I have to "revise" my Solidworks models I can easily do that. Once I have any corrections made, my software will let me scale my original models and math data to whatever percentage I want before I actually make drawings.
        Brian Rupnow

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        • #5
          Check out the movie!!! I didn't even try it with the cardboard. I have so many scraps of aluminum hanging around that I just sawed the arms out with the bandsaw from 3/8" plate. The peice of 3/4" plywood scrap wasn't quite big enough to transfer all of the wheel pattern onto, and I really regret that now. However, as a neat mechanical device, it works really well. I think the speed it can run at will be limited by the weight of the arms.--They have to have time to fall and engage the next post down on the wheel, or it gets hung up. I might try tension springs on the arms as proceed with this. What a hoot!!!
          Brian Rupnow

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          • #6
            So here it is at a more "model engine friendly" scale (75% of the original) . I will build this and post drawings as I go along.
            Brian Rupnow

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            • #7
              thanks brian ,

              i think you can download it legit on the net ..maybe google books

              but would much rather have the book

              some here quite cheap

              http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_tr...&_sop=15&_sc=1

              but shows two different books

              what's the difference

              all the best.markj

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              • #8
                Neat!

                I've always been fascinated by mechanical movements. Could stay and stare all day long at various museums when the have the machines in operation.

                Modern equipment may be more powerful and efficient, but are nowhere near as fun to watch

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                • #9
                  Lets start out by making the main wheel.----Just because we can!!! Its the most complicated part, and once its done its all downhill from then on.---And no whining about 3 place decimals!!!---Brian (Chief Designer Guy).
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Oh heck, we might as well go ahead and make a base while we're at it!!!
                    Brian Rupnow

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                    • #11
                      Has all of the earmarks of a really unique "finger engine"

                      (and with spring tension, you could mount it horizontally)
                      Last edited by johnnyd; 11-13-2011, 06:56 PM.

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                      • #12
                        found it

                        http://www.archive.org/stream/fivehu...ge/n1/mode/2up

                        think its well worth buying ..if you were just to keep on looking at the thing

                        all those mechanisms would become impressed on your brain

                        and problems after easily solvable .

                        page 26, upper right, has the table drive for my fritz werner mill

                        all the best.markj

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                        • #13
                          Tonight we'll start off with something simple---The wheel bushing.
                          Brian Rupnow

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                            found it

                            http://www.archive.org/stream/fivehu...ge/n1/mode/2up

                            think its well worth buying ..if you were just to keep on looking at the thing

                            all those mechanisms would become impressed on your brain

                            and problems after easily solvable .

                            page 26, upper right, has the table drive for my fritz werner mill

                            all the best.markj
                            great find, thank you

                            Got lost on that for a while

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                            • #15
                              And we'll do the hub. I had to go back and re-jig the wheel drawing to add in the tapped holes for the hub. If you have already copied the wheel drawing, please copy the new one I've just posted, as some other holes may have moved a bit as well.
                              Brian Rupnow

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