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How I Move My Machines Round Single Handedly

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  • How I Move My Machines Round Single Handedly

    I finally finished my lift frame that I started in the early spring. I tried it out for the first time today as I moved my KO Lee grinder across the shop. It worked perfectly. All I have to do to set this up is raise the base of the machine 1/2" with a pry bar and slip the 2" x 1/2" flat bar under the feet front and back, assemble the frame around the machine, tighten up the 4 nuts on the threaded rods just enough to raise the base 1/8" off the floor and away it goes.
    With some longer lengthe of sq. tube I can b my lathe or mill.

    JL.........................





  • #2
    Nice tidy lookin construction project!!

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    • #3
      Very nice. Angle iron might have been a better choice than bar stock for the part the machine sets on, though, no?

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      • #4
        It looks to be a well thought out design. Now if you could just wheel that fine looking grinder up to my house I'd be willing to do a long term test on it. You could thank me later.

        Pete
        Last edited by uncle pete; 11-14-2011, 06:51 PM.

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        • #5
          Great post and good title. This topic seems to come up about every 2 months or so. Nice job and good low tech answer to common problem.
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          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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          • #6
            Very nice! We use something like that to move wheel balancers and tire changers around, biggest difference is in how we lift. Ours uses an L shaped lever to grab the frame to lift one side, slip on the casters, then lift the other side. The lever is made such that it "locks" in place when the frame is raised.

            The frame uses two formed pieces of 1/4" plate to slip under the equipment, then two pieces of box tube slip through side to side. The caster slip onto the box tube. I don't have picture right now...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Mensch-Machine
              Very nice. Angle iron might have been a better choice than bar stock for the part the machine sets on, though, no?
              You know, that was my first thought, to use angle iron rather than 2" x 1/2" flat bar. But I would have had to have 1/2" thick angle for the threaded rod to screw into and the angle would have had to be at least 3 x 3. I have a lot of 2" flat in the shop so I used it. Since the feet of the base are so close to the rod the bar only sags about 1/8" or so at the center, not a problem.

              JL..........................

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              • #8
                If anyone remembers, I had started a post during the summer some time as I ran into a problem with the 2" tube sliding through the rod mount tube after I welded the tab and gussets on it. I was trying to make a die to swage the tube out, but I just ended spending a lot of time filing the high spots out of the inside wall.

                JL.............

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                • #9
                  if any of my machines looked that good, I to would want to take them out for walks
                  in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for all the nice comments....... Here is a picture of the rest of the machine.

                    JL...................




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                    • #11
                      ohhh My!!

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                      • #12
                        Very nice machine! Nice job on the rig also.
                        I use toe jacks and a pallet jack to move mine around by myself.

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                        • #13
                          Very nice Joe!
                          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                          • #14
                            So that's what a shop floor looks like.

                            Very nice machine.

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                            • #15
                              Did or have you ever used that machine? It looks brand spanking new!

                              How do the threaded rods attach to the plates running under the machine to be moved?
                              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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