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Anyone know about Nicopress tooling?

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  • Anyone know about Nicopress tooling?

    Ok.....We need to crimp Aluminum "stop sleeves" (and some oval sleeves) onto 1/16" SS wire. Not a lifting application at this time.

    We have the proper multi-diameter hand press from Mcmaster-Carr. numbers match all the table entries, AND the listing on the front of the packages of sleeves. It is the right press.

    problem is, the crimps look bad. Maybe they really are good, but they LOOK bad.

    All the pictures from National Telephone Supply show the crimps being nice and neat with a "squeezed area" and a slight "curb" around it.... But we get a fairly huge extrusion of material between the dies as a sort of "flash". See picture below.

    Yes, we are in the correct "C" crimp position..... it is the only one that even closes on the stop-sleeve. The others the sleeve drops through even when the dies are completely closed. I don't see how we can possibly be wrong about that.

    So I called NTS and asked..... they gave me the dimension that we should hit, which was 0.184" diameter of the crimp (and a dimension of 0.281 for the crimped length also). I also found out that we should have gotten a crimp gage, but apparently Mcmaster does not ship the crimp gage with the tools. Of course, NTS supplies the gages to them and expects them to go along with the tool...........

    What we have is a crimped diameter of 0.168", substantially smaller than the spec. Our length of crimped sleeve was also longer, as much as 0.030 to 0.040 longer.

    NTS suggested adjusting the tool until the crimp is correct. it's a great theory....

    Problem is that there isn't an effective adjustment.... there is a screw for it, (and a lock screw), but it does not affect the crimp dimension.

    The jaws close on a fixed stop, and all the screw does is change the angle that the handles are at when the jaws hit the stop. The stop sets all the dimensions, and nothing else affects it. The adjustment has no effect whatsoever on the crimp size.

    I understand the gage is a "go" gage only, that it does not check for a too-small crimp, but only for a too-big one. Therefore a smaller-than-spec crimp may be OK.......

    Is a crimp of the type below correct?


    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    It isn't right. Is that starting out as a regular oval sleeve with holes for a pair of wires? If so it needs to have two wires in it to crimp properly.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      No, it is a single wire "stop sleeve"..... # 878-2-VC

      Tool is 64-CGMP multi-diameter tool

      That combo is listed on the sleeve package, and in NTS literature (which is remarkably hard to get hold of)
      Last edited by J Tiers; 11-14-2011, 11:49 PM.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Comment


      • #4
        Can't help then. I have never used the "stop" sleeves. If I need a stop I use the splice sleeve with a short piece of wire the same metal as the sleeve and the size of the wire. Works ok. I would never trust a crimped on stop for anything safety critical anyway.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          I have crimped many Nicopress sleeves if the press matches the sleeves they are right file or grind off the sides and they will be fine. The sleeve will give you the proper press groove use it and it will be fine. If it is a long sleeve needing multiple pressing alternate the position of the press around the sleeve or they will get banana shaped. If the sleeve is for splicing 2 sections together start at the center and work to the ends.

          Mike

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          • #6
            J.T. FWIW when I was looking at the Nicopresses years back, I found out they are made by Fabco air. Check it out.

            http://www.fabco-air.com/pdf/crimp-FCT-J407.pdf

            I ordered one of these a few years ago and made custom jaws to get the crimp we wanted. If I remember correctly, the setscrew stops the extension point of the piston rod and thus limits the die closing. Worst case just have the die profile ground or wired to the .184 diameter with the jaws in the bottomed out position. As a cheaper trial you could tape a small pc of "shim" to the outermost point of one jaw. That will act as a positive stop and play with the thickness until you get the .184 crimp

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            • #7
              I have a crimping tool like this:


              The stop sleeves end up like this:
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

              Comment


              • #8
                Something to try, squeeze it part way, then stop and give a 1/3 turn, then squeeze the flashing back into the main body...repeat
                I had to do that even when using a 50 tom Hyd Press with carbon steel sleeves on 1" cable

                Walt
                Walt

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by winchman
                  I have a crimping tool like this:


                  The stop sleeves end up like this:
                  The crimper we have is the "multi" style, with more than one size crimp opening, but is otherwise the same. And, yes, that is the crimp we expected.

                  As for the adjustment.... it DOES NOT ADJUST ANYTHING BUT THE HANDLES..... at least as far as I can tell.

                  At the "base" of the jaws, near the pivot, the jaws appear to close completely, and after they do there is NO more jaw motion. The handles go "over center" and clamp, but there can be no change in the crimp size, the jaws are "two-blocked".

                  Effectively the crimp size is completely a fixed and non-adjustable distance (which actually makes sense), but it is fixed at a size that seems too tight. Maybe that is so that as it wears it will still make good crimps.

                  If so, why do they bother to explain about an adjustment that does not actually exist?

                  As for the double crimp idea.... When I tried that, it seemed to mess up the crimp, and it can't be good to be trying to move already work-hardened material in a new direction.... I can find NO procedure that includes that. Maybe it is OK, but it seems wrong.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It sounds like the sleeve is too big for the wire you're using. I've never had good results with the ones made to fit more than one size cable, like the ones from Lowes, etc.

                    I always thought the adjustment in the tool was to take any slack in the pivots causes by wear, and to ensure the jaws got fully closed.
                    Last edited by winchman; 11-15-2011, 10:02 AM.
                    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by winchman
                      It sounds like the sleeve is too big for the wire you're using. I've never had good results with the ones made to fit more than one size cable, like the ones from Lowes, etc.
                      Um..... it's a Nicopress tool, being used with the Nicopress sleeve that is marked on the front of its package with the tool number we are using......

                      So, current status is:

                      I called them again today, and got transferred to an engineer, who had in hand my email.....

                      1) The tool is definitely bad, they are not yet sure in just what way.

                      2) The crimp is WAY undersized, and that is wrong.

                      3) the adjustment SHOULD have just enough range to make a bad crimp ... since ours doesn't adjust the jaw closure at all, it's bad, bad, bad. (Jaws close hard way before the handles close, even with screws loose)

                      4) a double crimp, with 90 deg turn is not recommended (and wouldn't do much good in this case anyway).

                      5) They apparently are not real happy with McMaster-Carr about not shipping us the packet that has instructions, adjustment tools, and crimp gage. One is supposed to be shipped with every tool.

                      6) They are shipping us another crimp tool

                      7) we are shipping them the one we have, on a UPS call tag.
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I made my own crimp tool- two pieces of steel that slide together along some rods. Drilled the hole to what looked like the right size, then- place the stop, set the tool, smash with big hammer against 100lb piece of railroad rail. The crimping looked better than those- something there is not sized right.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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