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Buffer/polisher how many Watts needed?

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  • Buffer/polisher how many Watts needed?

    I am in need of a replacement for my current 250 watt bench grinder/buffer.
    This thing stalls when using a 6 inch mop.

    Looking at 3 new posibilities with an 8 inch mop.
    Been looking for second hand for ages but there is nothing around short of the enormous machines.

    -900 watt for 200 euro cast iron
    -750 watt for 100 euro warty cast iron
    -600 watt for 240 euro aluminium cast nice looking Optimum (some sort of Jet?)

    Polishing stainless takes a lot of effort in which a quicker machine will repay itself in no time.

    I asume the torque of the machine has to do with the amound of watts going through it.
    I do let the machine and the rosin do the job.
    Hardly ever do the easier to polish brass.

  • #2
    1 euro is about 1,35 us if it does not go to pot like the dollar.
    No one with any experience with polishing over here?
    You really live on an island.
    Can't be bothered with this all american party!

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    • #3
      Don't get snotty and your knickers in twist... and it would help if you filled in your location on your profile. It's nothing to do with a US party - many active members are from CA, AUS, UK, NZ and all over.

      Most here don't have a clue what you are talking about. Here... Bench buffers are not typcally rated in watts - we rate universal motor kitchen appliances that way so we know the power consumption (like my 50 watt coffee grinder). So.. is that INPUT watts or OUTPUT power? .... and few know how that relates to Hp..

      Just buy the biggest QUALITY buffer you can afford - the 750 or 900 are the biggest you list but we have no idea of quality. Be happy or sell it in a garage sale. If that's input watts, then it's about 1/2 to 2/3 hp or so; if output divide by about 750 watts for 1 HP.
      Last edited by lakeside53; 11-16-2011, 06:20 PM.

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      • #4
        Greetings from Canada
        Technically 746 Watts = 1 HP.
        From my newbie perspective, 1HP is a pretty serious buffer motor.
        I think as has been noted, 1/3-3/4 HP tend to be the more common sizes.

        Some cheapskates (yours truly proudly among them) are hunting around for a motor that they can attach a little arbor to that will take the buff wheels. If you do this, heck you could scare up a 2HP 240VAC motor and really have something to pull the hands off your arms when the wheel inevitably grabs the object you are buffing and yanks it away from you.....

        Lewis

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LHC
          Greetings from Canada
          Technically 746 Watts = 1 HP.

          Only if you're refering to "output power".

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          • #6
            Polishing stainless has got to be the worst stuff ever to attack, so go get the biggest one you can afford.

            Preferably go get yourself a 3 phase unit, of 2 maybe 3 horsepower, sure it will rip your arms of if you make a mistake, but, it sure will show the stainless who's the boss.

            A single phase just aint got the balls to keep going, when the going gets tuff, that's why a 3 phase, is the only way to go.
            Do you see any little single phase buffs being used on stainless, down at the local metal polishing joint ?

            Had to do that $hite for a living and the quicker you can get it done, well -----



            John

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            • #7
              I had a polishing business for some years, and bought a twin spindle Baldor buffer. 1 1/2HP, 3600 RPM, 13.8 [email protected] 110volts, 6.9 @ 240 volts... with 7/8" shafts. This brute can suck your arm in, give it back to you in twisted pieces, and NEVER miss a beat. But most of the time it'll just jerk the part out of your hands and send it clear to the other side of the shop (ruining it of course). It'll laugh the whole time.

              Be careful what you wish for. Buffing wheels for 7/8" spindles are BIG BUCKS as compared to 3/4" or less. If you don't buff for business, I would keep the machine reasonably sized just to keep consumable prices at bay. I burn my wheels and mops down to near nothing now that I'm no longer in business, and it stings to replace the various wheels and pads.

              Just my experience....FWIW.

              Mark

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              • #8
                Originally posted by garagemark
                I had a polishing business for some years, and bought a twin spindle Baldor buffer. 1 1/2HP, 3600 RPM, 13.8 [email protected] 110volts, 6.9 @ 240 volts... with 7/8" shafts. This brute can suck your arm in, give it back to you in twisted pieces, and NEVER miss a beat. But most of the time it'll just jerk the part out of your hands and send it clear to the other side of the shop (ruining it of course). It'll laugh the whole time.

                Be careful what you wish for. Buffing wheels for 7/8" spindles are BIG BUCKS as compared to 3/4" or less. If you don't buff for business, I would keep the machine reasonably sized just to keep consumable prices at bay. I burn my wheels and mops down to near nothing now that I'm no longer in business, and it stings to replace the various wheels and pads.

                Just my experience....FWIW.

                Mark

                Slightly off topic here - but safety related. This reminded me of a fellow I knew years ago. He wasn't the sharpest tool in the shed. There was a piece of wood - about 3' long and 3/4 x 3/4 in cross section, that was sticking out of the sheetrock wall in his workshop. He was "learning" to use a router table once and managed to run the wood in the wrong direction while holding it against the fence. It launched clear across the room and lodged in the wall. He left it there as a reminder.

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                • #9
                  Lakeside53, 1HP is 745.7 watts, whatever it's measuring. Watts and horsepower are merely different ways of measuring the rate of work done. Input or output makes no difference to their equivalence, though since nothing is 100% efficient, an electric motor will normally draw more (perhaps measured in watts) than it produces output power (perhaps measured in horsepower), so to that extent your caveat is correct.
                  I too occasionally buff stainless, and I have for years used a dirt cheap old single phase Ryobi bench drill of 1/3 HP, with the buff held in a home-made spindle (i.e., an old bolt) chucked in the drill. It is quite capable of hurling a piece to the far wall.
                  I also grind the stuff, and for that I have a single phase 750 watt 8" Ryobi bench grinder, which is impossible to stall.

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                  • #10
                    I also like the true Baldor type buffers - the wheels ("mops") are about 6 inches from the motor gving room to work around them. Bench grinder style with buffing wheels are very restrictive.

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                    • #11
                      As garagemark noted, most items related to grinder/buffer have sort of a line in terms of size that if crossed, costs increase disproportionally.

                      IMO this is one of those times the "quality" or truneess of a horsepower rating really plays a role. I use an 8" 3/4 Hp Baldor from their grinder/buffer series and I'm not sure how badly I would want to work with say 1.5Hp or 2Hp...I swear the thing creates its own little wind system but in a true industrial situation can really see the value in the 3 phase and higher voltage machines (which are perhaps, locally, one of the things not all that tough to find)

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                      • #12
                        This is buff linisher that made up in hurry out of an old 1/4 Hp washing machine motor for a job I was doing about 15 years ago it turned out to be real handy and hasn't left the bench since.I brought home all the old mops from work that had been run down to 150mm dai which was to slow for the polishing lathe at work (300 peripheral feet per/min) So in answer to your question I would suggest 2/3rds>1Hp for the size you requested but may be have a look at a 3phase motor on a variable inverter so you can crank on a bit of speed as the mop wears down but this I'm not that sure about
                        Last edited by Kiwi; 11-17-2011, 12:05 AM.

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                        • #13
                          My polisher/buffer is a 3/4 hp motor out of an ancient table saw. 3600 rpm, works great but if you are not careful it can grab what you have so lovingly worked on and fling it across the garage. Will move an 8" cotton buff easily and won't even slow down. I made one smaller using a 1/2 hp motor from a rotary file cabinet and that one was limited to 6" buffs. Frank

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