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Archer Tapper No.1 - auto-reversing threading tool

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  • Archer Tapper No.1 - auto-reversing threading tool

    Does anyone here have one of these in working order?
    I have just acquired one at a market and it was missing the locking chuck for the square end of taps. I found a photo of one on the net and made what I think it looked like, but it doesn't hold small taps securely. So I'm missing something in its design.
    I'm hoping someone has one and is inclined to take the chuck piece out of it's bore and photograph it for me, please.
    Cheers,
    Joe

  • #2
    The bits you want are two pieces of round bar which are connected together with a grub screw which is LH threaded at one end and RH at the other.I can`t remember if they are keyed to stop them turning in the hole but think they would be.
    Limy Sami who posts on PM will know as I gave him one a few weeks ago.

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    • #3
      Are you sure it is not a Jacobs chuck on your tapping head?
      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jhovel
        Does anyone here have one of these in working order?
        I have just acquired one at a market and it was missing the locking chuck for the square end of taps. I found a photo of one on the net and made what I think it looked like, but it doesn't hold small taps securely. So I'm missing something in its design.
        I'm hoping someone has one and is inclined to take the chuck piece out of it's bore and photograph it for me, please.
        Cheers,
        Joe
        i have a working archer no1 in my hand at moment what do you want to know?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mark McGrath
          The bits you want are two pieces of round bar which are connected together with a grub screw which is LH threaded at one end and RH at the other.I can`t remember if they are keyed to stop them turning in the hole but think they would be.
          Limy Sami who posts on PM will know as I gave him one a few weeks ago.
          yes there are two tiny screws that go into the keyways

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          • #6
            Hello Joe

            I have made a rough 'model' of the clamp for the archer tapper to show you the principle. The essence is that the hole for the threaded screw is offset by approx 3mm from the centreline of the two clamping elements. This gives more griping surface on the square end of the tap. The two grooves serve to position the clamping elements so that the offset is at the bottom where the tap is held (they engage with the two pins in the bore). SO, if you try to make these items, then the relative orientation of the groove to the offset is VERY important. The screw has a left hand thread (approx 9mm diam or imperial equivalent) at one end ( nearest the broached square socket) and a right hand thread at the other. See pic below (this is my first time to try to put up a photo/image so fingers crossed).

            HTH, Ian.


            [IMG][/IMG]
            Last edited by IanPendle; 11-19-2011, 11:13 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by IanPendle
              Hello Joe

              I have made a rough 'model' of the clamp for the archer tapper to show you the principle. The essence is that the hole for the threaded screw is offset by approx 3mm from the centreline of the two clamping elements. This gives more griping surface on the square end of the tap. The two grooves serve to position the clamping elements so that the offset is at the bottom where the tap is held (they engage with the two pins in the bore). SO, if you try to make these items, then the relative orientation of the groove to the offset is VERY important. The screw has a left hand thread (approx 9mm diam or imperial equivalent) at one end ( nearest the broached square socket) and a right hand thread at the other. See pic below (this is my first time to try to put up a photo/image so fingers crossed).

              HTH, Ian.
              Bloody brilliant Ian! Thank you very much!
              That's exactly what I needed to see. Excellent work with the model - and the image linked perfectly.
              So two opposing flats on the end of the tap are gripped by the two flat bottoms of the slotted cylinders and the threaded part just pulls them tight against each other? They position themselves centrally by being able to slide along the grooves, right?
              Just to confirm: the three-jaw (inverted) chuck is what centres the tap before you tighten the clamp?
              How big a tap can fit this tapper, please? With the space available, the square part og the tap has to be able to fit next to or below the threaded part, doesn't it?
              Cheers,
              Joe

              Comment


              • #8
                Hello Joe,

                "............They position themselves centrally by being able to slide along the grooves, right?"

                Re you first para above - Yes you have it right; the offset of the hole though the clamps is what gives extra gripping area. Note that these tappers do not like taps with a conical end - this reduces the amount of the square flats to grip. The end of the tap actually butts up against the un-threaded central portion of the clamping screw.

                This tapper will take up to about 8mm diam shank taps. You can actually insert a slightly larger diam shank , but it will catch on the three jaws, which in turn lets the springs come loose - believe me, you do NOT want this to happen as the jaws and springs are an absolute ******* to put back in place (assuming that you don't loose the springs). This fiddly process can reduce a grown man to tears!

                I insert the tap as far as it will go, then hand tighten the clamping ring, then tighten the clamping screw, then re-tighten the clamping ring using the C-spanner.

                In the course of doing the model, I took some measurements in mm - I can provide the dims if you want but it may take me a day or so as I'm still learning the software.

                HTH, Ian.
                Last edited by IanPendle; 11-20-2011, 11:19 AM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by IanPendle
                  Hello Joe,

                  "......... believe me, you do NOT want this to happen as the jaws and springs are an absolute ******* to put back in place (assuming that you don't loose the springs). This fiddly process can reduce a grown man to tears!"
                  Originally posted by IanPendle
                  "In the course of doing the model, I took some measurements in mm - I can provide the dims if you want but it may take me a day or so as I'm still learning the software."
                  Hi again Ian,
                  two of my spings were deformed and one missing.... I found three matched springs in my 'box of fiddly bits' and found what you found
                  Then, once assembled, in the end it was obvious that my replacements weren't stong enough to space the jaws evenly....
                  So I'll have to do it again when I find the right strength of springs.

                  I would indeed be interested in the dimensions - rather than inferring them from the dimensions of the chuck body. But please only go to the trouble if you want the excercise in your new software!

                  I understand why and how the taps should not have a conical end - most of my smaller ones don't as it happens.

                  One last question: do the three parts involved 'feel' hardened to you or just tool steel?

                  Cheers,
                  Joe
                  Last edited by jhovel; 11-27-2011, 01:36 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Hello Joe,

                    Sorry for the delay - been away.

                    I would say that the two clamps are definitely hardened. Not sure about the screw, but I would imagine that it it is also hardened or heat treated steel.

                    I have done the drawing with dims. Please PM me with your email address and I will send you a .pdf of the drawing.

                    Regards,
                    Ian.

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