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  • Shop PC's wireless woes.

    The new (to me) Dell shop PC with fresh load of XP Pro SP3 works great except for its wireless connection to my network. The PCI adapter that I switched from the old PC caused warnings to pop up ("This adapter is known to have problems with XP, blah, blah...." so I sprung for a Belkin USB wireless adapter on the advice of a friend at work.

    I installed the drivers, followed instructions and it connected but shows 6 to 10 mpbs speed at home. I drug it to work with me this morning and it connects here OK but the speed shows 14.5 mpbs when it should be 54 I think on a G system. The signal strength says "Very good" but will not connect to any website.

    I suspected a chipset/motherboard issue so installed the Dell official chipset drivers, uninstalled/reinstalled the Belkin driver, blah, blah, disabled the NIC card. I'm PO'd & lost as Hogan's goats. Any suggestions?

    The only issue I can think of is that when I did the HD format/XP install I used the XP disc w/SP3 that came with my wife's PC which is a couple years newer than mine. I have all the Dell discs w/drivers that came with mine and installed the drivers from them.
    Milton

    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

  • #2
    I suspect interference. Try changing the channel. Better yet, use a wired connection.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      Yep, I'm giving up on wireless. Our guy here at work's given up too and he's pretty good with networks. I'm guessing there's some kind of motherboard/bios/magic issue that mere mortals can't comprehend.

      I'll be drilling holes and running a cable this weekend.
      Milton

      "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

      "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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      • #4
        Ditch the USB wifi. I have tried several of them and none have worked as well as a pic card. The antennas suck.

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        • #5
          Definitely. I saved all the bags & wrappers & receipt so it's going back to Wally World.
          Milton

          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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          • #6
            The antennas suck.
            Yes, they do. I do have wireless just for me wife to use so she can port her netbook around the house. To make it work well I built a real antenna.

            It's a biquad. Easy to build and has excellent forward gain.



            I used wired for all of my gear.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              If you have signal strength indicated as normal but can not connect, you may need to have your modem reset. I have to call my ISP from time to time to have them do a reset that can not be done from any local controls. It only takes a few seconds and then all is well again.

              I use wired most of the time, but have a wireless hub so I can roam about the house and for future computers. The wireless seems to work OK when the wired connection from the same hub is working.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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              • #8
                It may be that his network card can see the router just fine, the bars are based on the signal strength. The problem is that its a two way connection, so if the antenna in the computer sucks there might not be much of a signal getting back to the router, hence the low speed.

                If log into the router and it has a decent feature set it may list the signal strength from the remote computer. Usually listed -db. If you use DD-WRT it will also list noise and signal to noise ratio.

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                • #9
                  I tried wireless and rapidly gave up.

                  I run an 85Gbit over powerline system that has been 100% reliable for several years. If I want an extra port I just plug in an adaptor and wait about 10 seconds for the link light to come up.

                  Not so long ago I upgraded to BT Infinity FTTC (fibre to the cabinet; which gives a sync speed of 40/10Gbit). The hub incorporates WiFi and is supposed to cope with interference. It does seem to do so and I rarely if ever have connection problems. The Kindles used to have to be re-connected from time to time, but haven't had that snag for a while. My occasionally used laptop has never given a problem.
                  Paul Compton
                  www.morini-mania.co.uk
                  http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                  • #10
                    Definitely some kind of hardware or software conflict problem. Before I put it all back in the box to return I stuck the USB wireless adapter into the PC I run the lathe with. It connected immediately showing 54 mpbs speed plus it's 6 ft farther away from the router. One of my life's many unsolved mysteries.

                    I ran a temporary cable to the NIC and it works great. My son-in-law the satellite TV installer is coming over this weekend to run a proper concealed cable & I'll done with this frustrating time waster.
                    Milton

                    "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                    "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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                    • #11
                      My ex girlfriend had a Dell laptop that had problems connecting to my wireless router.

                      Being a ex network engineer, I figured out the problem.

                      For some reason, the laptop wasn't getting a IP address automatically. Other stuff I use get a IP address no problem from the router even over wireless.

                      On the laptop, open up a command window (enter 'cmd' in run). Type in 'ipconfig'. I think you will see that the wireless adapter has an address of 0.0.0.0, which means you don't have an address.

                      Go into TCP/IP configuration and enter a IP address manually. It has to be in the same range as your router, which is usually either 192.168.0.x or 192.168.1.x. I would use 192.168.0.20 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and a default gateway of 192.168.0.1. If you can get into the router and see the settings, that would eliminate any guesswork.

                      Yup, pain in the ass, but it's windows.

                      I don't follow threads to much, so if you have questions, send me a Pm and I'll try to answer.

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                      • #12
                        I have a Dell E521.

                        The USB ports on the front of the computer are SLOW. I put an external HD on the front and it seemed like I was getting "floppy disk" speeds. I plugged it on the back directly on the motherboard and it worked very well.

                        My guess is the front ones pick up interference and thus net out at a lower rate after error checking.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks baldy but I'm skeert of people that actually understand this stuff.

                          Actually I'm done fooling with the wireless for this particular PC due to lack of available spare time. I've bookmarked your post for future reference if I have wireless problems in the future. Thanks
                          Milton

                          "Accuracy is the sum total of your compensating mistakes."

                          "The thing I hate about an argument is that it always interrupts a discussion." G. K. Chesterton

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                          • #14
                            If you feel the need to run cable... think about trying some powerline network adapters ( net over power circuits) just plug in to a nearby socket & cable to PC

                            used a few recently, inc my own office as wireless in my house is useless.... I have 4 802N routers & still struggle in some places...

                            Was well impressed with the 19mbs connection from the shop...50m from the house

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                            • #15
                              Last week I bought a pair of Belkin network over powerline adapters. I could not get them to work even with both on the same branch circuit. They would light up and say they had a link but there was no connection. I tried a variety of circuits around the house but no go. I took them back.

                              One possibility is that they didn't work because I have very effective line noise filters on several of the branch circuits. These aren't power bars but are a very expensive unit called an "active tracking filter" that suppresses surges and line noise. It is mentioned in the manual that the units may not work on a power bar with a filter. The other thing I noted is that the units cause massive RF noise in the VLF spectrum. My Yaesu FRG 7700 will receive all the way down to about 100 hertz.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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