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  • Cast iron

    Rang the foundry to see what the possibility in getting a blank Cast Iron flange for the one I broke on the DH, not that it would no longer work but I couldn't live with it.Well one foundry quoted $800.00 NZ for certified haematite! yeah right.the most realistic quote at $150.00NZ One further enquire I found out that you can buy Cast Iron by the metre and get what ever length that you require, that equates at $40.00NZ + tax + courier + machine time. The things we do some times, I wonder. Still it's better than watching the telly
    Last edited by Kiwi; 11-24-2011, 09:22 PM.

  • #2
    Dh?...........

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    • #3
      ......Must be Doo Hickey.
      Bricolage anyone?....one of lifes fun games.

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      • #4
        I've saved a lot of money by not watching the telly ( I don't sit still for long enough for plaque to solidify in my arteries, so my medical bills are low) but I spend it on materials for the hobby. I did inquire about buying some durabar or other cast iron materials once, and I got a similar shock. It seem that if you ask for something that isn't pure run of the mill, they think it's worth its weight in gold. Usually the inquiry is met with some facial tweaking, then a comment about how exotic that is, then how much they want to rape you for it. Cast iron- c'mon, it's just another form of the raw material, and probably cheaper to produce than steel.
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          It's to do with economy of scale and fix and variable costs.

          If you want to buy one molecule of cast iron he will still need to charge you ca. $30, to cover his fixed costs.

          Phil

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          • #6
            DH is probably dividing head.

            When ordering from a foundry, you have to consider that their quote is based on making up a pattern and preparing a mold, then pouring the piece. For a one off, the price reflects this. The slice of a precast/extruded bar is much less.
            Jim H.

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            • #7
              Kiwi, does the price of the casting make you feel like you may be able to use the broken part now? Have you repaired it and don't feel like it's going to work or hold up?

              Is it a dividing head casting as was mentioned in another post?
              It's only ink and paper

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              • #8
                KIwi, As a refugee from the iron & bronze foundry trade , some three decades back, i cannot but sympathise with yourself,& my other forum members when they dont just get raped , but gang raped into the bargain by these modern metal dealers.

                There are a few reasons for this malais, Firstly, the virtual extinction of the small iron or brass foundry which frequently had some sympathy with small manufacturers and home machinists, These little concerns could include your small order in with the general run of jobbing work being undertaken. with a minimum of fuss These little shops were run usually by owners /managers/ foremen, who came up through the ranks, In otherwords, common sense was the name of the game.

                Nowadays also everything has to have a paper trail, iso, or din standards more formal , coupled to that unit costs , something you could hold in your hand might have a unit cost of £30, even before production starts, Now no place for the small man unless he wants to pay through the nose No longer some foreman guestimating a figure for the casual order, & a cash transaction settlement

                Next we come to the horrendous costs of raw material, fuel and consumables, and in a lot of cases the horrendous bank overdraft inflicted on the firm by the ever kindly , generous & sympathetic bankers It looks to me it could not get any worse for the poor little home shopper Bob Cratchet in this my Christmas Dickensian tale when we also have the prospect of the companys accountant wanting a new Mercedes car With these woes and the Chinese e/mailing the accountant and telling him that the castings can be made for 30%of the manufacturing cost in China, the ghost of Christmas future tells me the days of the foundry are bleak in the new year

                If you think that your woes are over, Think again, I guess it will get worse, Recently i have noticed that the metal dealers, Especially one i used to deal with have a new breed of hard nosed flashy young sales types, I guess also these guys are fighting for survival as the Chi Coms and other Pacific Rim concerns are gobbling up the worlds recources at an ever increasing rate.

                How i wish we could fast track backwords on occasions to a an era of more sympathetic suppliers to the hobbyist

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                • #9
                  Stitching

                  Originally posted by Kiwi
                  Rang the foundry to see what the possibility in getting a blank Cast Iron flange for the one I broke on the DH, not that it would no longer work but I couldn't live with it.Well one foundry quoted $800.00 NZ for certified haematite! yeah right.the most realistic quote at $150.00NZ One further enquire I found out that you can buy Cast Iron by the metre and get what ever length that you require, that equates at $40.00NZ + tax + courier + machine time. The things we do some times, I wonder. Still it's better than watching the telly
                  Any help?

                  http://www.google.com.au/#sclient=ps...w=1280&bih=501

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                  • #10
                    Sorry guys yes DH was the dividing head from the other post, I did braze it up but didn't do a very nice job of it and started spending more time on it than it would take to turn up a new one.I rang around to see if I could bog up the broken flange for a pattern and also to find out if they have flange blanks in stock as I thought blank flanges would be a fairly common product.On finding out that you can buy cast iron bar by the length and the cost of it being realistic, most certainly surprised me.I have in the past had bronze boat fittings cast and thought that casting cast iron would be about the same, just a lot more heat required making it a little more expensive considering pig iron is lot cheaper than bronze. In the local foundry where I get my bronze done they tack the one off jobs on to bigger orders and you just have to wait or pay a premium price which is ok
                    Cheers Kiwi

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                    • #11
                      Why not use bronze if it is cheap and available?

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                      • #12
                        Kiwi,

                        I am not sure which part you are replacing, but how about using free cutting mild steel, it should be readily available, cheap, stronger and easy to machine. You might score a scrap off-cut if you visit the right place...

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                        • #13
                          Or

                          Or perhaps aluminium rod and/or plate.

                          It machines very well too.

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                          • #14
                            As I didn't have any other suitable size metal of any kind so had to go and acquire it, thinking by the time I get a mild steel plate cut or sliced of a bar the cost of a blank flange would be much the same. Peter it,s the mounting flange for the three jaw chuck, the chuck was held on with four 1/4" whitworth bolts that held the chuck on with two to three threads each only and one was stropped initially set out to remove the flange to re-drill and tap the hole and replace the bolts with studs and nuts so the chuck can be removed with out removing the flange

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                            • #15
                              Bar bell weights in the sporting goods department are cast iron.

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