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Are Sigma lens any good for camera

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  • Are Sigma lens any good for camera

    I bought a Sigma lens for my Canon Rebel 300D. I am not at all happy with the pictures. The lens is a 28mm 200mm

    So now I guess I will buy a Canon lens.
    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    They are hit and miss. Usually pretty good. This company in Hong Kong has some pretty amusing reviews:



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    • #3
      28mm to 200mm is quite a wide range for a telephoto to cover. As an experiment, you might try taking a picture at 28mm, 100mm, and 200mm and seeing if one section of the range is significantly better or worse. I notice the reviews posted by Macona are both for fixed focal length lenses, which may tell you something about Sigma's fixed lenses but I'm not sure they necessarily tell you much about the variable focal length lenses.

      But you will almost certainly solve the problem by buying a real Canon lens.
      Last edited by SGW; 11-26-2011, 01:17 PM.
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      • #4
        When buying lenses keep in mind that because of the sensor size of the 300D you need to multiply the given focal length by 1.6. So 28mm becomes 44mm or close to 50mm lens and 200 becomes 320mm. Because the sensor is only using 60% of the image area any image flaws are magnified.

        The low end Canon lens aren't very good either. I have the 75-300 kit lens for the 300D and it is very soft focus. That is a polite way of saying that the sharpness sucks.
        Last edited by Evan; 11-26-2011, 01:34 PM.
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        • #5
          In general, fixed focus lenses will always be much better than those with a zoom range. Then those with a smaller range will be better that the ones with a wide range.

          I stay with Canon lenses, many of them are "L" series. I still couldn't find a wide angle zoom lense I'd really like, but all of them are, definitely, better that any of the third party lenses.

          By the way, I have a few very good Canon lenses in mint condition and original packaging I could sell, so if you're interested, contact me by e-mail.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Evan
            When buying lenses keep in mind that because of the sensor size of the 300D you need to multiply the given focal length by 1.6. So 28mm becomes 44mm or close to 50mm lens and 200 becomes 320mm. Because the sensor is only using 60% of the image area any image flaws are magnified.
            But on the other hand it is the centre of the image that falls on the sensor so you are avoiding any degradation there might be towards the edges of the image.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Black Forest
              I am not at all happy with the pictures.
              The user reviews of the Canon lens on Amazon http://www.amazon.com/Canon-28-200mm...owViewpoints=1 are generally favorable, but seldom raves.
              Allan Ostling

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              • #8
                i've spent a lot of time and money after those lenses.. sigma, tamaron, etc.
                buy used, name brand.. its the way to good. You won't regret it long term.

                If you can find Tokina lenses in the range you like, usually the price to
                performance is hard to beat.

                Tony

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Black Forest
                  I bought a Sigma lens for my Canon Rebel 300D. I am not at all happy with the pictures. The lens is a 28mm 200mm

                  So now I guess I will buy a Canon lens.
                  Why aren't you happy with the pictures? What is your technique for taking the pictures? Do you use a tripod? Are you using flash? Can you post an image you're not happy with and share the aperture and shutter speed for it?

                  If I had a Canon, I'd start with the plastic 50mm f1.8 lens, then go from there.

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                  • #10
                    Sigma has a reasonably good rep for optics and cameras but all makers
                    have several series of lenses. A perusal at sites such as B&H photo
                    will show lenses covering roughly the same ranges at price points of
                    1x, 4x and 8x with x usually in the $150-250 range (suggested retail)
                    which reflect the general performance. Lower end lenses will have
                    softer focus, plastic construction and sourcing in China, Thailand etc
                    where the higher end tend to have larger apertures, metal construction
                    and Japanese sourcing. The f 4.5-5.6 ratings of many inexpensive zoom
                    lenses for cameras upto $1500 retail is compensated for by the very
                    sensitive CMOS detectors, compared with film era cameras. You will not
                    see the higher end lenses in the retail stores, you will have to seek out
                    specialty shops or digital shops such as B&H photo for these. OTOH
                    you have to consider whether it is the machine or the operator and
                    whether a $800 lense will really make that much difference over a $200
                    lense, sometimes it will, many times only til you blow up the pix to 16x20"
                    size will you see the difference. In camera processing is getting very
                    sophisticated and a deep understanding of the internal workings can
                    sometimes make astounding differences in results. Sites such as
                    DPReview give indepth reviews of cameras and lenses and a search there
                    might be helpful in evaluating both the lens you have and one you are
                    thinking about.
                    Steve

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                    • #11
                      But on the other hand it is the centre of the image that falls on the sensor so you are avoiding any degradation there might be towards the edges of the image.
                      Quite so. It helps reduce vignetting and coma at the wide end but it also magnifies poor sharpness.
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                      • #12
                        Here's a site that tests lenses, one of many.
                        http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Len...Database/Sigma
                        And another
                        http://www.slrgear.com/reviews/showcat.php/cat/2
                        Last edited by claymont; 11-26-2011, 04:26 PM.

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                        • #13
                          In general, fixed focus lenses will always be much better than those with a zoom range.
                          Absolutely. I would really like a decent fixed focal length wide angle for astrophotography. The less glass the better and the less glass that moves the better. Unfortunately that doesn't necessarily mean cheaper. In fact, they cost more than the zoom lenses. The Canon EF24 mm L series is only $1749.00 and the EF 14mm L series is $2359.00.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            In the Nikon lens line, their 14mm f2.8 fixed isn't quite as sharp as the newer 14-24 f2.8 zoom. Go figure.

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                            • #15
                              Part of your problem is you bought a 28 to 200mm zoom. There is a practical limit to what you can ask optics (that you can afford) to do. Right now with the state of optical glass 70 to 200 is pushing it. Better you buy two cheaper lenses with dramatically lesser zoom or, best of all, buy prime lenses instead of zooms. Zoom lenses are always inferior to primes given build and the materials are the same.

                              If you stay with Sigma and Tamron are far superior to what they used to be 30-45 years ago. At that time they were pretty much junk with Soligor and Vivatar being the better of the second shelf optics.

                              I would suggest you buy a mild wide angle and moderate telephoto and crop in post processing. To get around that problem I bought two systems. I use a Canon 5D mkII reflex with Series L (red band) 24mm to 105 and a 100-400 lenses. Both work reasonable well but don't hold a candle to my Leica M9 range finder w/21-24-35-50-75 and 90 mm leica glass. The primes are about as flawless as you can get. If one wants to be a pixel-peeper you better go leica
                              Last edited by Your Old Dog; 11-26-2011, 05:53 PM.
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