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Remote controlled electric fence charger

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  • Remote controlled electric fence charger

    We use electric fence on our farm to manage the horses and sheep. Today I was repairing the fence at the other end of the farm and had to call to have someone plug and unplug the charger while working on the fence. There are chargers available that have this feature. The remote is placed on the fence wire and a signal is sent to the charger to turn it on or off.

    It is not possible to buy a add on unit to do the same with a normal charger.

    So just how hard would it be to build a unit that is either controlled by cell phone or a special remote that sends a signal up the fence wire to the charger?

    Something that could be added to most any charger.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    I would think that it wouldn't be terribly difficult. A remote switch (RF would work nicely for short distances) triggering a relay for the power would do the job. It is possible to get interfaces that communicate over GSM, so you could trigger it with a text message.

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    • #3
      Got a link

      Black Forest can you post a link to the remote controlled fence charger you mentioned. Would save me a lot of walking if it is not to high.

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      • #4
        Wear insulated gloves.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          Here you go...

          http://www.gsm-auto.com/

          I'm sure there are others on the market.

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          • #6
            Hmmmmm...... we used to just short the fence to ground when needing to work on it, maybe modern charges are too savage for that..

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            • #7
              That GSM-auto sounds like it would work. Thanks for the link.

              Gallagher makes one and there are others. I don't have a link.
              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Black Forest
                .... had to call to have someone plug and unplug the charger while working on the fence...
                Sounds like you already have a remote controlled wife or daughter, why do you need anything else?

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                • #9
                  Undependable. They might just suddenly remember something that annoyed them and plug it in.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Isn't there a plastic or?? something disconnect that one can use to cut the power, think i've seen those many times, it just unhooks by spring tension, then rehooks again the opposite way.

                    I'd be careful allowing those girls to control the current on and off while working on the fence, untill you get that coffee maker fixed again.

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                    • #11
                      Is the power level not adjustable? When I used to do fence, I simply turned the power down to a low setting, and did my work as necessary with it giving me a lil tickle. If the tickle gets to be too much, Id simply put gloves on. The cows usually avoided it, so we never had problems with needing the shock to keep them in while working on it, but worst case maybe you could move the animals to another pasture, pen, or barn while working.
                      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                        Hmmmmm...... we used to just short the fence to ground when needing to work on it, maybe modern charges are too savage for that..

                        That works fine. It's how we stole fruit as a kid and how my shirt-tail uncle in Sasatchewan works on his.

                        Just carry a steel stake and a short length of bare wire. Won't hurt the charger. Short both sides of the work area if you can't figure which end it's fed from. lol..

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lakeside53

                          Just carry a steel stake and a short length of bare wire. Won't hurt the charger. Short both sides of the work area if you can't figure which end it's fed from. lol..

                          Even easier, the fences were on insulators fixed to steel stakes and it was just a matter of twisting the stake a little to short the fence.
                          (I swear we had a Jersey cow who knew how to do that too! )

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                          • #14
                            I used electric fence to keep my horses off parts of the property so they wouldn't overgraze. It was an old electromechanical type with the spring style oscillating flywheel. It pulses about once per second. We had one horse that figured out how to scoot under the wire and only get one shock at most. She would kneel down with her nose less than an inch away from the wire. She must have been able to sense the jolt because she would wait for it and then bolt under the fence and maybe get a jolt on the ass on her way through but never on her head as she slid under the wire.

                            The low impedance chargers they have now are powerful enough to shock even when grounded.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              We had one horse that figured out how to scoot under the wire and only get one shock at most. She would kneel down with her nose less than an inch away from the wire..
                              I can well believe that as we had a sow who used to do much the same, she would stand where she could hear the ticking of the controller, gently rocking back and forth then make a sudden lunge through the fence which of course was then broken down and all the rest got out too.

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