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Lathe spindle extension?

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  • Lathe spindle extension?

    Never seen one before and I am trying to think of a situation where a person would need one.

    Camlock verson can be seen in this video at 1:23 in

    http://youtu.be/FKGYn0GOsmE?t=1m23s
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    I dont think it is just an extension. It looks like the back flange only has 4 studs.

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    • #3
      Yes, it looks like a camlock extension sleeve to me. Could it be that it has a larger bore than the spindle, allowing larger diameter objects to be 'swallowed' by the chuck?

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

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      • #4
        There's only one set of cams so no spindle extension (an extension would likely have to connect through the existing cams and have its on locks - so I'd expect 2 sets of cams). It looks like a model 60 and those had a pretty big collar behind the camlocks, if they polished it up or if it was changed at some time you might get the effect in the video.

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        • #5
          The second set of cams are on the lathe's spindle. One end's female, the other end's male.

          Thinking about it, such a device could also be made with different size camlocks - say, a D-6 on one end, a D-8 on the other to allow different size chucks to be used.

          Ian
          All of the gear, no idea...

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          • #6
            Could be. Many a time I needed a larger spindle bore to "swallow" extensions of flanged workpieces. A spindle extension like that would be a help but the added length produces a corresponding loss of rigidity. In some classes of repeat work it might pay to make a lathe spindle extension. One might make one end D1-x and the other A1-x (or maybe A2-x because f the through-bolt flange BC) and bolt the chuck on. The camlock spindle details and parts are a huge PITA to machine one-off.

            Alternatively, one could make an L series extension if he had a lot of D series spindle tooling - or the other way around.
            Last edited by Forrest Addy; 12-06-2011, 06:54 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by wierdscience
              Never seen one before and I am trying to think of a situation where a person would need one.

              Camlock verson can be seen in this video at 1:23 in

              http://youtu.be/FKGYn0GOsmE?t=1m23s
              I just noticed in the video, when he's demonstrating the carriage feeds, that it seems to have sliding feed and surfacing feed engaged at the same time (at least the carriage handwheel and the crosslide handwheel are both going round at the same time) I've never used a Monarch, so is it supposed to do this? Other lathes I've used or owned have an interlock to stop this from happening.

              Richard

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Richard Wilson
                I just noticed in the video, when he's demonstrating the carriage feeds, that it seems to have sliding feed and surfacing feed engaged at the same time (at least the carriage handwheel and the crosslide handwheel are both going round at the same time) I've never used a Monarch, so is it supposed to do this? Other lathes I've used or owned have an interlock to stop this from happening.

                Richard
                The Hardinge HLV for example can be used like that. It allows the cutting of a 45 degree taper.
                Paul Compton
                www.morini-mania.co.uk
                http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EVguru
                  The Hardinge HLV for example can be used like that. It allows the cutting of a 45 degree taper.
                  Yabbut only in one direction. Nice feature at first look but hard to take advantage of. Too bad lahe maker never built a carriage with two axis independent feed controls like a VTL

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Ian B
                    The second set of cams are on the lathe's spindle. One end's female, the other end's male.

                    Thinking about it, such a device could also be made with different size camlocks - say, a D-6 on one end, a D-8 on the other to allow different size chucks to be used.

                    Ian
                    So if the adapter accepts a Camlock it'll have cams as well - so there would be 2 sets of cams. If it doesn't it's then just a chuck back.

                    Here's a shot of thew spindle face from a brochure:



                    The video's spindle looks a lot like this but with the collar behind the camlock bit polished up and maybe turned a bit. My bet is that there used to be a safety or coolant shroud over it that's been removed.

                    On engaging both feeds at the same time - on the Monarch the result is not the 45 degree you kind of expect but a 63.4+ degree angle (or 26+ from the other perspective). On the Monarch the cross feed diameter reduction is the same as the longitudinal feed length. Since the angle is defined by the radius and the length of the cut you get this result.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Richard Wilson
                      I just noticed in the video, when he's demonstrating the carriage feeds, that it seems to have sliding feed and surfacing feed engaged at the same time (at least the carriage handwheel and the crosslide handwheel are both going round at the same time) I've never used a Monarch, so is it supposed to do this? Other lathes I've used or owned have an interlock to stop this from happening.

                      Richard
                      Our Hendey at work does that too,cuts a 45 when both are engaged.In the Hendey manual it shows you how to use the crosslide feed in conjunction with the leadscrew to turn tapers greater than the taper attachment can handle.Handy feature to have.
                      I just need one more tool,just one!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wierdscience
                        In the Hendey manual it shows you how to use the crosslide feed in conjunction with the leadscrew to turn tapers greater than the taper attachment can handle.Handy feature to have.
                        On the Monarch the cross slide feed is off the feed drive (not the leadscrew), and it's interlocked at the gearbox with the leadscrew so that only one turns. So when you set the feed at the gearbox it's going to be the same for the logitudinal as the crossfeed diameter - can't be varied between the 2.

                        So the Monarch can't turn scrolls as the Hendey does.

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                        • #13
                          I still hink it's a camlock extension, rather than a chuck backplate. Have a look at this:

                          [img][http://img.photobucket.com/albums/10.../Extension.jpg][/img]

                          There's even a camlock key in it.

                          Ian
                          All of the gear, no idea...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ian B
                            There's even a camlock key in it.
                            And when it's mounted on the face of the lathe spindle there will be 2 sets of cams (requiring keys) visible. One set on the part you image and one on the lathe spindle.

                            Are we talking at cross purposes or am I just not seeing something you see? Short of making a completely new spindle any adapter is going to have to have a camlock back that mounts on the spindle face and so will always have the cams on the spindle. If your adapter also has a camlock face there will be a second set of cams on it.

                            I happen to have one camlock->camlock 'adapter', one that allows indexing the camlock mounted chuck independent of the lathe spindle. Here's a shot of it mounted, you can see that there's going to be 2 sets of cams visible:



                            On edit: awww - crap. I see what you're talking about - the dingus on the floor and not the spindle. I must have been skipping that part of the video. Yeah, some sort of camlock->camlock adapter or extender. if it's the same mount on both ends about the only thing that makes sense would be to eliminate some of the narrow hole through the spindle - but the camlock taper is going to limit how much of that you can get rid up.

                            Oh - a lot of chuck backs are run with 3 or 4 pins, it holds well enough and that's good enough for a lot of folks/purposes.
                            Last edited by rkepler; 12-07-2011, 01:14 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Another possible use for a same-to-same spindle extension (Forrest noted one) would be to put the working area further down the bed. Lots of lathes already have wear right in front of the chuck. Someone might also want to avoid wear there, and give the carriage better bearing over it's life.

                              I know, it's a pretty weak reason, but a possibility.

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