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Need cleaning info and manuals for chucks

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  • Need cleaning info and manuals for chucks

    I have two chucks that came with my lathe that I would like to diasssemble and clean/oil.
    The first one is a Bison 8" 3-jaw with 2pc jaws. Model #3205. It also has 8992 and 92 stamped on it. This chuck is in good condition with no rust, I would just like to clean and oil it.
    The second chuck is a Horton 10" 4-jaw with 1pc jaws. Model #150. I have never heard of this manufacturer before. This chuck has severe rust on it. I would like to sandblast it but don't know if that is an acceptable procedure or if I should stick to scotch brite and a wire brush?

    If anyone has a source for manuals for these chucks please let me know.

  • #2
    Can't help you with manuals, but chucks aren't terribly difficult. If you're not sure if you'll remember how everything goes together, take pictures as you go. If you're not sure where to start, post a couple of pictures of the chucks. I recommend just taking out bolts and see what falls apart! Seriously, there aren't too many pieces in a chuck.

    I would not recommend sandblasting. I'd stick to scotch brite pads. If really rusty, maybe some electrolysis would be a better idea. I'd just hate to see the sandblaster errode too much of the precision surface where the jaws slide, scroll turns, etc.


    Andrew

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    • #3
      Chris,

      What Andrew says. only to add, and maybe you know already, but the jaws of a 3 jaw ned to go back in in sequence - 1, 2 then 3. Turn the scroll as if to close the chuck with the key until you see the start of the "thread", back the scroll off a litle, then insert jaw 1 as far as it'll go. Turn the scroll another 120 degrees, repeat, then same for the 3rd jaw.

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

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      • #4
        Taking 3 jaw chucks apart is relatively simple. Remove the jaws. Remove the back plate, then there should be an inner plate , remove it. Then remove the scroll plate. Inside that you should see what looks like miter gears with the square sockets for the chuck keys on them, . After you take these out you should be able to clean out the scrolls and everything else. Don't forget to mark everything, as you disassemble it, so it goes back together in the same places as they where before. Most chuck, especially the cheaper ones don't like to be reassemble with the parts in different places then they were originally.

        Your chucks may vary, so pay attention to how you take them apart, reassemble in reverse order.


        Don't sandblast, use Scotchbrite and light oil with a good amount of elbow grease.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Ian B
          Chris,
          ...............
          maybe you know already, but the jaws of a 3 jaw ned to go back in in sequence - 1, 2 then 3.
          Ian
          Again in case you don't know, the jaws can be inserted in any order, BUT if they're in the wrong order you probably WON'T like the result...., they'll close considerably off center.
          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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          • #6
            I take my center punch and put one dot,2 dots ,3 dots on
            each part......I have sandblasted the od on one also....just do not blast where the jaws go in or the scroll plate. (use a wire brush). I scribed a line for the back plate also. The 1st cleaning takes awhile but makes it a breeze for future cleaning (one a year).
            www.neufellmachining.com

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            • #7
              Lynnl,

              Er - yes, you are of course quite right - but oddly enough, I was assuming that the OP would like the reassembled chuck to hold work at least roughly on centre! :-)
              All of the gear, no idea...

              Comment


              • #8
                For a lubricant, don't use oil as it will sling out on you and the nearest wall.
                For years I have used Dow Corning Molycote Metal Assembly Paste.
                http://www.skygeek.com/molykote-g-n-...bly-paste.html

                It is a non sticky grease that is loaded with solid lubricant particles designed for hi-pressure lubrication which describes the conditions in a lathe chuck perfectly.

                RWO

                Comment


                • #9
                  What Andrew_D said, chucks aren't complicated as long as you remember the first rule of intelligent tinkering, which is to keep track of all the parts, and there aren't that many. They should go back in the same places they came from. Somebody suggested taking pictures as you go. A good idea, and with today's digital cameras it's trivial to do.

                  I would seriously hesitate to sandblast a chuck, even just the body. I'd probably try soaking it in a bucket of oxalic acid, which will get rid of the rust. You can buy oxalic acid crystals at a large paint store; it's used to bleach wood.
                  Or, electrolysis would work. Or try a Scotchbrite pad and kerosene or lightweight oil.
                  ----------
                  Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                  Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                  Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                  There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                  Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                  Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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                  • #10
                    +1 for molycote, great stuff
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am familiar with chuck jaw installation on chucks from my sherline to Kitagawa cnc chucks, but have not completely stripped any of the larger chucks down. So I was wondering if it is pretty much the same which seems to be the case. Sandblasting sounds like a no-go so I guess scotch brite either by hand or a die grinder and some oil/pb blaster should work. I have made the mistake of using light oil once before and it left a nice line up the wall and along the ceiling so I'll have to order some grease. Thanks to everyone for the help.

                      As far as posting pictures of the chucks, how do I do that without a photobucket account?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You can put pictures on any server you have access to. If you got "free disk space" with your Internet service where you can create a website, you could host pictures there. You don't even need to create a website as such. Just copy the picture files to the appropriate server directory and use the picture's URL as the link. It might be something like

                        www.myspace.ipsupplier.com/username/photo.jpg

                        or whatever convention your Internet provider uses for naming personal web spaces.
                        ----------
                        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SGW
                          You can put pictures on any server you have access to. If you got "free disk space" with your Internet service where you can create a website, you could host pictures there. You don't even need to create a website as such. Just copy the picture files to the appropriate server directory and use the picture's URL as the link. It might be something like

                          www.myspace.ipsupplier.com/username/photo.jpg

                          or whatever convention your Internet provider uses for naming personal web spaces.
                          I use this outfit for picture storage for use on the web:

                          http://tinypic.com/

                          Create a free account, make a folder and upload. When displaying any individual picture, the web, forum or email URL will be displayed at the left.

                          Pops

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'd not use ANY power means of cleaning......

                            1) open it up.

                            2) scrape out gunk and old grease etc.

                            3) soak in "Purple Cleaner" or similar

                            4) brush off residue with toothbrush under running water.

                            5) if rust is present, soak a while in phosphoric acid.... won't take long, maybe 20 or 30 min.

                            6) rinse off, lightly brushing any areas where rust was. Dry quickly with towels and heated air, then when dry oil wipe all surfaces.

                            7) lube as needed and re-assemble, evaluating the fits and looseness in case it is so loose it really needs scrapped.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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