Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Feeling Guilty?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Feeling Guilty?

    I'm new at most of this but learning & trying to set up the best shop I can & then I read this article about Paul Kuhni & what amazing things he created with the barest of tools. WOW! It's amazing! Here's the link. Hope it works. http://www.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...oredirect=true
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  • #2
    In one of his Bedside Readers, Guy Lautard tells of a man that builds working guns, whatever he's interested in, with files. I'll see if I can find it. What I remember is he has LOTS of files ground into many profiles with safe edges. Found it, in the first one about 100 pages in called 'Gun Making'. He also has a wood lathe, but works mostly with hacksaws and files.
    Last edited by gizmo2; 12-20-2011, 12:58 AM.
    I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

    Comment


    • #3
      I saw a youtube on the arms trade in Pakistan. It's amazing what they can make by hand. 20+ years ago you had to be careful on 45 Autos that it wasn't a homade chinese copy from WW2. They would make them out of any steel & copy all the marks & names. Then they were worthless now they have collector value. If they can make working AKs by hand I can learn to make anything on the tools I'm gathering (with the help of you guys) but before I ask I'll think of Paul & the Pakistans & how would they do it. You can't teach common sense.
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

      Comment


      • #4
        In our shop, we're used to seeing instruments hand made with little or no tooling. Most of that stuff is wood, of course, but every so often we get an example of Third World metal work, like these geared tuners, strictly hand filed and fitted on a Mexican guitarron:

        Cheers,

        Frank Ford
        HomeShopTech

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Frank Ford
          In our shop, we're used to seeing instruments hand made with little or no tooling. Most of that stuff is wood, of course, but every so often we get an example of Third World metal work, like these geared tuners, strictly hand filed and fitted on a Mexican guitarron:
          Wow nice work, teeth all look nice and well spaced, worm gear looks very consistant... Sure, they did'nt file off the hacksaw marks.. but thats still 10x better then I do with a hacksaw.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

          Comment


          • #6
            That guy must have had an "involute" file.
            VitŮŽria, Brazil

            Comment


            • #7
              http://machineshop.olin.edu/resource...mp%20Lathe.pdf

              Comment


              • #8
                Look between the gear's teeth.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Isn't it simply amazing what can be done with nothing more than a 6" Atlas lathe and milling attachment and the ability to use them.

                  I always get a kick out of listening to the various "experts" here that trash these tools as being worthless junk, not capable of doing any real machining.
                  Jim H.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I used to be into Mountain biking & remember an event I did called the Iceman Cometh, about 30+ miles of snow ice mud hills all the way. I saw a guy on an old schwinn 10 speed with a baby seat do great while a guy on a $10,000 bike not finish. I think it's 10% machine & 90% talent which comes from strong interest attitude & practice. My Mom coined a word for it "Willy" or the willingness to do whatever it takes. It all about attitude,
                    Last edited by flylo; 12-20-2011, 03:22 PM.
                    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                    country, in easy stages."
                    ~ James Madison

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I jokingly say all the time that I have enough machines in my shop to build anything. Occasionally I get an eye roll and a 'ya sure'. Little do they know...with a 14x48 lathe and my Bridgeport, both properly tooled a guy can go a LONG ways toward making anything. Given motivation and proper skills. That said...there are some things that I simply use a file or emery as it is quicker.

                      A good quality file, proper technique, a supply of chalk, a file card, LOTS of time, elbow grease and a healthy dose of patience will produce some amazing results. I love showing people something I have draw filed. I hear the response.. ..."I'd love to do something like that ....but I can't afford all those fancy tools you have".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you refer to me,Hannum,I have advised lathe hunters to try to get something better than an Atlas. I have NOT said they can't do any work. I started out with a Sears Atlas.

                        If your time is not an issue,you can do nice work on an Atlas lathe. I made the brass indexing set I posted on my Atlas.

                        However, having a lathe that is more rigid,like my 2nd. lathe,a 10" X 24" Jet,made in Taiwan at the time,I was able to make a decent amount of money at a good hourly rate. This I invested in more tools and equipment.

                        I think this was a much more practical approach than continuing to puddle along with my Atlas. My shop grew much faster by being able to do several times more work in the given amount of time. Work that I made money on.

                        It all depends upon what you want to accomplish with your time. And,we don't live forever.

                        Hell,when I was a kid,I did everything with a file and a 1/4" electric drill(which I had to borrow.) You might be surprised at what can be done with those 2 items.
                        Last edited by gwilson; 12-20-2011, 07:34 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Reminds me of a story in a Model Engineer magazine from the early '50s showing a guy with a locomotive that had won a gold medal or the Duke of Edinburgh cup or some other top award at the London ME show that year. He built it using an old round-bed Drummond lathe that he had to hold together with Vise-Grips because a bomb had fallen on his workshop during WWII.
                          ----------
                          Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                          Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                          Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                          There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                          Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                          Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Don't over think things George. There are plenty of nay-sayers when it comes to Atlas. The worst are on PM. If you so much as mention the word Atlas, Don will personally come to your home and stomp your keyboard to dust. I know this for a fact.
                            Jim H.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Not my fight but I have a 618 Atlas that I'll never sell. I also have a 13x40 gap bed gear head asian in the crate & just today picked up a 17x60 Leblond. I have a blast on the little Atlas & it was made a few miles from me. Great small lathe. I also have one of thier first tools a wood lathe with a drill press on the end runs on the same motor & made from bent angle iron dates from the teens. And one of there last tools a very small metal horiz or vert band saw. Both from an old employee that passed away.
                              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                              country, in easy stages."
                              ~ James Madison

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X