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Shaper practice run -- QCTP holders

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  • HSS
    replied
    Yes it did. Good work, Tony.

    Pat

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  • Tony
    replied
    just to wrap things up, the other half turned out well.





    -Tony

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  • jugs
    replied
    Originally posted by philbur
    Would it not be preferable to have the cutting forces taken by the fixed jaw. Would I have seen shaper vices where the movable jaw is actually the other jaw, so to speak.

    Phil
    Yes thats a shaper/planer vice (the handle is on the fixed jaw end) I have 2 vises like that, one can be swapped so the handle can be at either end.

    Proper shaper set-up for
    most work-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=PnE_h5qmjpk

    Long thin work-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOtIr...eature=related


    cutting dovetails
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRvZD...eature=related

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  • GadgetBuilder
    replied
    On the QCTP dovetails I made I found the width more touchy than expected. After the first one didn't fit quite right I took the QCTP off the lathe and tested the fit while the work was in the vise. This let me tune the handle position to match the factory holders.

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  • Tony
    replied
    Agreed but I don't have such a vise.

    I noticed this "integrated" (2piece?) vise in a video on this very subject
    by Rudy K: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRvZDBBXDXY

    I'm thinking that something similar would make a nice next project.

    It appears there are Tbolts that, once tightened, would take most if not
    all of the cutting forces.

    Tony

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  • philbur
    replied
    Would it not be preferable to have the cutting forces taken by the fixed jaw. Would I have seen shaper vices where the movable jaw is actually the other jaw, so to speak.

    Phil

    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    That picture describes holding a thin piece of work as opposed to how to mount the vise.

    If transposed to the work show in the OP this makes the sideways mounting incorrect as Tony is holding by the narrow edges.

    Good point though in that sometimes you have to hold by a sideways mounted vise.

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  • drof34
    replied
    I would suggest that you rough out the opening where the tool holder fits before you finish anything. Things move when you remove a lot of metal.

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  • Tony
    replied
    DOH!









    its an Impero P3/70 .. bottom of page:

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  • platypus2020
    replied
    Tony,

    Maybe I missed it, but what QCTP is that?, it has a male dovetail on the tool holder, the Aloris/Dorian types have the male dovetail on the tool post.

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  • Tony
    replied
    easy, I just take my shirt off and turn it inside out over the trash can.

    (don't know if this is what you meant?. but just a chip brush. a rag to wipe
    the oil off so the pictures are purdy)

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  • vpt
    replied
    Looks great! How you cleaning the chips up?

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  • Tony
    replied
    I left the vice the way its shown as my longer stock (10") will have
    to be fit that way. Since its my first time cutting dovetails (or anything
    really!) in the shaper, I knew I was going to be taking it slow and didn't
    think orientation would be a big deal.

    That said, the more comfortable I got, the more aggressive cutting I
    found myself doing. Until I knocked the part loose.

    So I turned the vice around.

    completed roughing cut. on average I was about 0.030" DOC and
    0.025" feed per stroke:



    roughing in the dovetail:



    finished dovetail and a couple of strokes to break the sharp corners:





    Shaper is slow & hypnotic. on the finish passes I was right in there
    and only really noticed how close i'd gotten when the chips started hitting
    me in the nose.

    The cutting oil had washed off most of my blue so I was looking hard
    to find my scribe marks.

    I think there must be a cut off point.. ie part this small:
    mill. a gang of blocks 10" long.. shaper. if nothing else at least the roughing
    passes to hog out material.

    Shaper is a LOT of fun. its the only machine in the shop I now have
    a chair next to. ha.

    tried flipping the part and dialing it in for the other side. my vice stinks.
    I wish I would've left the work alone and just ground another tool.

    to be continued..

    Tony

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    That picture describes holding a thin piece of work as opposed to how to mount the vise.

    If transposed to the work show in the OP this makes the sideways mounting incorrect as Tony is holding by the narrow edges.

    Good point though in that sometimes you have to hold by a sideways mounted vise.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bryan B
    replied

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by madmec
    I know no one who would do it that way, vice jaws are always parallel to the ram stroke, for safety an efficiency reasons.

    Thomas
    That theory doesn't hold true in fact it's the reverse.
    If work can move it will, 18th law of workshop fact.

    And what will happen is the work will tip and instead of presenting the depth of cut you have set, the tool will be facing the work in a tipped position and smack into it actually causing more damage.

    Shapers which do present more cutting forces than milling machines should always have their vises parallel to the stroke.

    Leave a comment:

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