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  • Drill press belt vibration

    My import 12 speed drill press has always had vibration issues at the higher speeds. Stiff belts seem to be the issue. Is it possible to purchase belts that remain flexible and do not obtain a memory set? What would be a good source?

    Also any suggestions for a good drill press vise in the $100.00 range?

  • #2
    Paul, you might try one of the segmented belts that I see being used on lathes, mills and drill presses as a retrofit. I have seen these for sale at Harbor Freight.

    As to drill press vices, I put on of these on my drill press 20 years ago and it has been excellent. http://www.craftsman.com/craftsman-8...p-00924091000P. Somewhat more than $100.00 but I'll bet it would be worth it in the longrun. Mine was about $70.00 when I bought it also mine may have been a 6". You can probably find a knock-off of this knock-off for less money with a little searching.

    Tim

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    • #3
      One that I can answer :-)

      For the drill press, get some Power Twist link belts, they're available several places, Grizzly is one, I think HF has their own cheaper version. Makes a huge difference. My table saw would dance for a good 5 minutes after firing it up for the first time every day, put these on, and a nickle balanced on edge won't fall over, now. I also have them on my DP and wood jointer, and I'm still debating with myself about putting them on my lathe.

      In you're price range on the vise, you can get a 4" milling vise that will be WAY better than any drill press vise I've even seen, even if not really good enough for milling. I got mine from Little Machine Shop.com, it's a Kurt clone and has worked well for me so far. Good luck

      Dave

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      • #4
        The link belts are theanswer. I put them on my table saw, jointer, import drill press, and bandsaw. Every one was smoother afterwards. Not cheap but worth the price. Grainger, MSC, Rockler and the other usual suspects carry them. Check the price because some places think they are gold.

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        • #5
          The solution is to remove all pulleys and carefully balance them. It usually helps to machine the back sides to get them into balance. Then replace the pulleys, using shims to achieve a precision alignment. Then replace the belt and try again. If there is still a lot of vibration, tear down the motor and take it to a precision balance shop and get the armature balanced.

          Belts are blamed for causing vibration which is really caused by other things. Once you have the entire power train balanced and aligned, there may still be some flutter in the belts. This it's OK to take out with link-belts, although they do wear the pulleys much faster than regular.

          I learned this from an old machinist. I went there to look at a 14" Logan lathe. All of his machines ran perfectly smoothly. He told me basically what I wrote above.

          That's my 2ยข worth. Guaranteed to be worth exactly what you paid for it.

          metalmagpie

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          • #6
            I'm sure there can be vibration caused from unbalanced pulleys, but so far on every machine where I've changed to a link belt, the improvement has been dramatic and nothing else has been required. There are two downsides to link belts- one is that they are taller overall and might interfere in close quarters (raising the blade all the way on a table saw will show this up), and the other is cost- $8 to $10 a foot where I live. I have never regretted the purchase though.

            There is a grade of link belt that has metal pins or something, which I've never tried. Anybody have any experience with those?
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #7
              Link belts installed on a few machines, to me they are well worth the money!!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by paul
                Also any suggestions for a good drill press vise in the $100.00 range?
                If you were in the UK, I'd reccomend a Neal drill press vice.



                http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5-125-mm-N...-/330370793226

                I bought one years ago and it's really nice.

                Soba is an Indian brand and I don't think they're quite as good now as they were, but still pretty good I think.
                Paul Compton
                www.morini-mania.co.uk
                http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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                • #9
                  The Harbor Freight belts are actually Jason Industrial's Accu-Link and are made in the USA. Hard to believe it, I know. I did a double take when I first purchased one. I've bought several since.

                  http://rubberproducts.jasonindustria...-link-belting?
                  Mike
                  Central Ohio, USA

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                  • #10
                    Link Belt

                    5' of Jason Industries Link Belt (Made in USA) from HF for about $18.00 or so with the 20% off Coupon. Sells for about $22.95 with out the coupon.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ohio Mike
                      The Harbor Freight belts are actually Jason Industrial's Accu-Link and are made in the USA. Hard to believe it, I know. I did a double take when I first purchased one. I've bought several since.

                      http://rubberproducts.jasonindustria...-link-belting?

                      I have purchased two of the Acculink belts from Harbor Freight and had good luck with them. There is one thing to watch out for though, the manufacturer, Jason Industrial, either has two factories or has moved the factory to Italy. No matter the case, the belts I purchased at two different times from HF came from two different countries of origin (unnoticed by me at the time of purchase), the first from the U.S.A., the second from Italy. The issue arises if you want to either join the two belts or use extra links left over from a belt of one country of origin on the belt of the other country of origin. The actual links are different, slightly in width and considerably in length. The tabs and holes used to link the belts together are not interchangeable. This is a non issue if you get belts from the same country of origin or if you don't plan to join links of two different belts together. It is something to be aware of if you plan, as I did, to interchange links between belts.

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                      • #12
                        In that same vein, you might want to purchase a goodly length at one time, just to be sure all the links came from the same batch. If you're running more than one belt in parallel, this is going to be your best way to get the lengths to match. I don't think you can expect to go back to the same supplier six months later and find the links to be exactly the length of some that you had left over from before- even if the same brand and country of origin or manufacture.

                        I would not even want the end of one roll, then some from a new roll to make up my order. If there's not enough in total on the old roll, I'd ask for all of it off the new roll.

                        This does bring up another issue- suppose you have an application in which you can use either one belt of say 5/8 width, or two belts of 3/8 width side by side. Aside from cost ( two 3/8 belts would probably cost more than one 5/8) would you get an advantage either way? Offhand, you would say that the smaller belts can go around a smaller pulley, so if that's on the motor, you could get a slower slow speed. What about power transfer ability, or smoothness, or stiffness of torque transfer? Any ideas?
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          "Someday" I'll ditch the three stepped pulleys on my POS 1989 Jet and make three stepped Poly-vee J-section pulleys. J is smaller than the K and L section serpentine belts found on cars.

                          Dead easy to make, and super quiet running belts.

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                          • #14
                            I like my Chinese drive belts. My drill press is mounted to a piece of 3/4" plywood. When I stand on it, it gives me a nice foot massage. And I couldn't tell if it was running without the top lid rattling like a string of cans behind a car.

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