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  • Bottle Jack Repair

    I have somehow acquired an old Hein-Werner 5-A bottle jack:



    It leaks down when loaded, and I don't know whether it needs cylinder seals or if the valve is leaking. I'd check the level, but I don't know what the procedure is for this jack. Should the jack be upright (seems wrong, as the filler hole is near the bottom of the jack), on it side (which side up, with cylinder extended or retracted), or what.

    Anyone know anything about how to go about this? Hate to trash this old workhorse.
    If ignorance is bliss, why aren't there more happy people?

  • #2
    If it's not leaking externally, it's probably the check balls. Dirt and crud builds up on the ball seats and they leak.

    One way to do a quick test:
    1. Open the release valve several turns.
    2. Pull the cylinder up manually then push it down.
    3. Repeat #2 several times.
    4. Close the release valve and see if it pumps up and holds.

    If it works, drain the old oil and flush with stoddard solvent using the same procedure above. Drain and refill with hydraulic oil.

    I've never seen one that didn't have a plug on the cylinder body. If the plug is in the base, just turn it on it's side to fill.

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    • #3
      Those good old brands of bottle and floor jacks are becomming almost collectors items!!

      Top Quality, can be rebuilt, and last for generations if taken care of.

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      • #4
        I would remove the valve (the little thing you tighten when you want to jack something up or release it) as there may be crud in the seat or the threads may be damaged or crudded up giving you the feeling that the valve is tight but in fact it's really not. Seen it before!!!!!!!!!!!

        JL...............

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        • #5
          fill with ram retracted. . . sometimes the screw that shuts it off is pushing a ball into a seat. replace the ball if it shows corrosion and coin the new ball into the seat using a drift punch and a BFH. one or two heavy whacks with the BFH will usually do it. . . .

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          • #6
            Im always amazed when I see old rusty jacks and other absolutely filthy hydraulic equipment...

            The piston rods are always so shiny and clean!
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by CCWKen
              If it's not leaking externally, it's probably the check balls. Dirt and crud builds up on the ball seats and they leak.

              One way to do a quick test:
              1. Open the release valve several turns.
              2. Pull the cylinder up manually then push it down.
              3. Repeat #2 several times.
              4. Close the release valve and see if it pumps up and holds.

              If it works, drain the old oil and flush with stoddard solvent using the same procedure above. Drain and refill with hydraulic oil.

              I've never seen one that didn't have a plug on the cylinder body. If the plug is in the base, just turn it on it's side to fill.
              That improved things greatly! Still have some leakage around piston, so I guess I'll pull it apart to clean it. Any idea whether new seals will be available for this? Would you guess O-rings or leather or ???
              If ignorance is bliss, why aren't there more happy people?

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              • #8
                I doubt that you'll find a seal "kit" for it but you should be able to match the size. Hydraulic seals won't be standard O-rings. They're made to seal by pressure. The more pressure, the tighter the seal. The link below shows some of the different types of hydraulic seals. (Shown for reference only)

                http://www.afchydraulics.com/hydraulicsealkits.html

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                • #9
                  jack repair

                  Hi all: I just went through the same problem with my jacks; both floor and bottle. Google floor jack repair, I think, and up pops a step by step way of tracing your problem. I agree with Ken above as to how simple most if not all jacks are. With the instructions printed out, I was able to fix all but one of my jacks. Don't ask why I need 6 wheeled jacks and qt least that many stand alone bottle jacks ranging from one ton to 100 ton!!??? Wayne.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Don't ask why i need 6..........................

                    Because jacks are like clamps,, you can never have enough.

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                    • #11
                      for kits and parts i use Beerman Precission in New Orleans. . .

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                      • #12
                        I used to go to the metal salvage yard just about every Saturday morning. I found a lot of jacks and used the "quick test" above to see if they were worth picking up. Some looked brand new and some antique but most would pass the test. I wouldn't bother with the ones that appeared to have a leak (seals). I ended up with a garage full of jacks before I started giving many away to make room. I kept two floor jacks, six bottle jacks (2-50T) and a pallet jack. None needed more than cleaning and fresh oil. Oh, and the most recent find--An air over hydraulic 20T in near pristine condition.

                        You'd be surprised at what folks throw out. And I ain't too proud to go digging for the good stuff. I've accumulated a lot of tools at $0.15 a pound.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the encouragement. I've contacted a place in Minnesota which might be able to get any required seals for me. After vacation, I'll tear into it and see what happens.
                          If ignorance is bliss, why aren't there more happy people?

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