Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Making Tight Threads

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Making Tight Threads

    I am wondering about how to make threads that are tighter than what you might buy at the hardware store.

    Obviously, a tap will cut the size it is. Being here in Brazil, I don't have ready access to taps other than normal size. I assume that there are undersized taps??? but I will have a hard time getting them.

    On the die end of things, I imagine that cutting with the die "loose" (on the adjustable ones) would help some, or cutting it on a lathe a little over sized.

    Any thoughts or help out there?
    Vitَria, Brazil

  • #2
    Well, there are different classes of threads on a number system, from 1 to 4. 1 is interference, and will need some force to make the connection. A class 2 will start by hand but only for a couple turns, then you'll need a wrench. 3 will hand fit smoothly, and 4 will spin up freely. You know, hardware store stuff. Taps have the fit on them somewhere. Some dies are adjustable, others are made solid and are by class. When doing gun work, the goal is a class two fit, and you achieve it by how you machine the threads on the barrel tenon.
    I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

    Comment


    • #3
      The easiest way to do it, size dependent obviously, would be to single point thread the necessary hardware on the lathe. You could then take as many or as few cuts as necessary to get whatever thread interference you wanted.
      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

      Comment


      • #4
        dies ..there are split dies ..

        taps ..drill the hole undersize and it will be tighter ,

        all the best.markj

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by gizmo2
          Well, there are different classes of threads on a number system, from 1 to 4. 1 is interference, and will need some force to make the connection. A class 2 will start by hand but only for a couple turns, then you'll need a wrench. 3 will hand fit smoothly, and 4 will spin up freely. You know, hardware store stuff. Taps have the fit on them somewhere. Some dies are adjustable, others are made solid and are by class. When doing gun work, the goal is a class two fit, and you achieve it by how you machine the threads on the barrel tenon.
          The above information is incorrect. Typical hardware store thread fits IF made properly are to Class 2.

          The correct basic info you want is below...How you achieve these thread fits is better explained by others.

          Classes 1A, 2A, 3A apply to external threads; Classes 1B, 2B, 3B apply to internal threads.

          Class 1 threads are loosely fitting threads intended for ease of assembly or use in a dirty environment.

          Class 2 threads are the most common. They are designed to maximize strength considering typical machine shop capability and machine practice.

          Class 3 threads are used for closer tolerances.

          Class 5 is for interference thread fits...

          Comment


          • #6
            generally done one of two ways, adjusting the split die to the desired result, or...

            machine and measure them. Know what class the tap is for, look up the tolerances and machine the male a couple of thou smaller. If you don't know the class, measure it if its a 4 flute, if three tap a hole and thread some plug gauges and measure them.

            Measurement via thread wires or thread mic. Like a shaft properly fitting a bore, it's tough to arrive at a good fit by accident....get measuring those threads
            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

            Comment


            • #7
              Thread Class A or B

              When I was teaching apprentices - I wanted to come up with a way that they could easily remember A was Extenal thread and B was Internal. I thought about it for a while, and it came to me.

              NOW, I am politcaly correct, so in a mixed class (Male / Female) - it was 'B is for Bagel - you can put your finger (bolt) in the hole of the bagel (Nut)- simple, and easy to remember - Thank you 'Tim Hortons' the great Canadian Icon.

              Let me back up a bit here, so most of my classes would be all Male - 20 something, full of testostrone - ready to take on the world - smartest guys they know.

              I an case where we had to get it down into make simplistic terms. and grab their attention - I decided to use an animal - another Canadian Icon:

              For the internal thread - 'B is for Beaver', and they never forgot.

              Patrick

              Comment


              • #8
                I too recommend single pointing the threads to achieve the desired fit.

                One can also buy taps to cut the desired internal fit, but they are not usually listed in most distributors catalogs. Going smaller on the tap drill is one way, but you need to be extra careful so you do not break the tap in the hole.

                I'm not sure why you're looking for a tighter fit as there are other ways to make sure the fasteners stay together such as nuts with nylon inserts (Nyloc), thread locker (Locktight), etc.

                If you're looking for more shear strength just go with a fine thread instead of a course thread or go to the next larger size.

                If you're trying to achieve better alignment that is usually done by using dowel pins or similar design features.

                Comment


                • #9
                  What I am actually thinking about doing has to do with tsmartin's idea of how to cut large dia. stock on a short lathe with a smaller through hole on the head and chuck.

                  I plan to make a cat head for the tailstock end of the lathe. Then make a kind of cheapo chuck/follow rest for the carriage. Basically I thought to bolt a flat plate where the follow rest is attached on my SB and fit three bolts approaching the center on it's face, sort of like a regular follow rest, except that they would grab the shaft and hold it while machining. These bolts would want to have a fine adjustment and very little, if any slop.

                  If you want to see more what I'm talking about, see some of the last posts on "shop made tools."
                  Vitَria, Brazil

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    David,

                    I don't see why something like this made with 1/2" or 12 mm hardware store threaded rod and coupling nuts wouldn't work.


                    If gripping force or "dialing in" is a concern, add a 4th bolt and revise the spacing to the corners of the plate.
                    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Please correct me if I'm wrong...

                      A die does not necessarily cut the crests of the thread, if the screw is turned to a size smaller than the major diameter needed for the nut. Same for a tap, when the hole is bigger than the minor diameter. That means you can adjust the fit somewhat by adjusting the hole/rod diameters.

                      Isn't the fit a matter of getting the thread form perfect ( exactly 60 degrees at the proper depth ) and the major/ minor correct?

                      But if you want the bolts with no slop, I think you should look at using a bolt with a shoulder that will act as a pin to provide a positive location.

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                      Location: SF East Bay.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by danlb
                        A die does not necessarily cut the crests of the thread, if the screw is turned to a size smaller than the major diameter needed for the nut. Same for a tap, when the hole is bigger than the minor diameter. That means you can adjust the fit somewhat by adjusting the hole/rod diameters.

                        Isn't the fit a matter of getting the thread form perfect ( exactly 60 degrees at the proper depth ) and the major/ minor correct?
                        right you are. When speaking of size or fit of thread, you're not talking the OD or ID - that just concerns % engagement. Its the distance between the V's that matters - commonly measured with wire's that register in the V's

                        For, example, if you took a 4 flute tap where you'd measured it across thread wires, tapped a hole, then turned a threaded section to be .002 less across the wires, you'd get a thread that feels very exact, smooth and tight. .001" over and its interference. We don't typically measure the tap (often 3 flute) and instead rely on a tolerance range as defined by the class of fit - you just look it up in the bible.

                        Most fasteners are rolled and in production you have to work within ranges of tolerances - these are made suitably sloppy both to facilitate low cost production tolerances and to have enough clearance that with a max sized bolt and min size nut they'll still go together with less than clean room environment ....and it doesn't much matter insofar as strength is concerned. Where a nicely fit thread can be beneficial is on feed mechanism; ie dynamic vs static.
                        Last edited by Mcgyver; 12-30-2011, 04:32 PM.
                        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've always tapped a hole, then adjusted the split die to get the fit I want. A few test pieces are typically in order to adjust the die properly.

                          Or you can buy a slightly smaller tap based on what its "H number" is. The H number of a tap is the number of half-thousandths (i.e 0.0005") a tap is oversize. If you look in a big tool catalog you'll see for a given tap (say 10-32) you'll see maybe H1, H2, H3, H4, H5 with perhaps H2 marked as "most common size." If you want a closer fit, buy an H1 version of the tap.

                          The "most common size" changes as the thread size changes. A 2-56 may typically be H1, while a 5/8-11 may typically be H4. (I'm just guessing on these values, but the larger the thread the larger the "most common" H number will be.)
                          ----------
                          Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                          Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                          Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                          There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                          Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                          Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            For oversize threads, using a split round die is the easiest approach.
                            Use a die holder that has a sharp point to open the gap on the die .
                            If you have a Geometric head, its a piece of cake.

                            For tapping, Try heating the part to 390 (F) [200 C] and tapping while heated. This will give you about .0005" tightness at room temp.
                            It will be even better if you can keep the tap cooled ..which is hard.

                            390 degrees will not cause a loss of temper on the tap

                            Rich
                            Green Bay, WI

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by davidwdyer
                              I am wondering about how to make threads that are tighter than what you might buy at the hardware store.

                              Obviously, a tap will cut the size it is. Being here in Brazil, I don't have ready access to taps other than normal size. I assume that there are undersized taps??? but I will have a hard time getting them.

                              On the die end of things, I imagine that cutting with the die "loose" (on the adjustable ones) would help some, or cutting it on a lathe a little over sized.

                              Any thoughts or help out there?
                              Are you sure that you can't get such taps in the 3rd most industrialized nation in the western hemisphere?

                              Those wizards among you who have given bogus info, read cuemaker's post again.
                              No, reducing the hole diameter will not change the class of fit, which is determined by the tap. It will ,however result in broken taps. The clearance of the thread is flank to flank. The crests have nothing to do with it.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X