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Barrel tumbling - hsm style

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  • #16
    years ago i worked briefly for a comb company, they used to make 'nit' combs, aka combs to remove headlice!, the 'pins' of the comb were die cut from 'surgical' stainless wire in a shuttling die wire cutter, the ends then had to be rounded.
    this was done by barreling with abrasive compound [grit] strangely the wire 'pins' ended up roundedatthe ends without loss to diameter, they were placed in brass jigs by girls on a line then insert moulded. [i was the toolsetter], the girls put the pins in brass bars and these were fet into austen allen injection moulders to form the handle from polyprop.
    long bit over, the barreling was in old cement mixers! i'm glad i went to work in the steelworks as making hundreds of thousands of bug combs drove me simple.
    However if it rotates at about 30rpm with grit and water it will work!, just takes a bit of patience
    regards
    mark

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    • #17
      Tumblers work at good old FPM. Calculate the FPM using the driving shaft. Doesn't matter how big around the container is so long as you have enough compound and work in it to actually tumble wave-like as has been mentioned.

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      • #18
        I realize that I'm probably coming to the party a little late. At this point I'm sure you are more than likely all done with the parts, also this may be a little too large for the lathe with a 200 rpm minimum speed, which as has been discussed already is way too fast.

        When I ran into this though last night I immediately thought of this thread and thought it might give some here a few ideas for a Poor Man's Deburring Tumbler .

        I don't think I would be inclined to use this approach on a steady basis as it would put a lot of hours on a machine fairly quick, but for the odd time it could serve a purpose.
        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

        Location: British Columbia

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        • #19
          Willy, nice pics in the video, thanks for that.

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          • #20
            Seems like the low speed required to allow tumbling makes this a slow process.

            How about a vibratory machine?

            Maybe something that uses eccentric bearings like orbital sanders.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by noah katz
              Seems like the low speed required to allow tumbling makes this a slow process.

              How about a vibratory machine?

              Maybe something that uses eccentric bearings like orbital sanders.


              Whats wrong with slow? Throw the parts in before going in the house at night and in the morning they are all done for you. If speed is needed that is what blast cabinets are for.
              Andy

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              • #22
                Well... I must admit to having done nothing. I debated ways of constructing a rube goldberg for a while. Then I decided it was a loss leader in this instance. I left the lot "as turned". The truth of the matter is that a vibratory machine is what I was trying to avoid buying. That was the real impetus of this question . I am beginning to realize one would be.a valuable addition to my shop, but I was not in a position to lay out the money for one just now. I understand that there are more benefits than just time with regard to vibratory vs. barrel tumblers. Most information I have found point out that a relatively heavy media must be used in the barrel tumblers. Vibratory machines allow lighter, smaller media which can have certain benefits --especially with softer workpieces. That's all hearsay from the web, though, so feel free to refute it! Haha.

                I must compliment the posters here for finding the video that I believe may have instigated my idea. That looks really familiar now that I think of it. Too bad my lathe doesn't go down to the back gear speeds available on that SouthBend. My one idea which was not implemented was to drive off of my cold saw's spindle. Rig up a pulley off the spindle somehow and use simple, round urethane belting to drive the barrel. ...an idea for a later date maybe

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                • #23
                  One of my hot rod friends made one with the lower 10" of a drywall bucket attached at the bottom to a 60 RPM homemade gear reduction mounted at about a 45 degree angle. The parts are then put into another complete bucket, either open or with a lid, that is inserted into the other one and driven by friction. You have noticed how tight those 5 gallon drywall buckets fit together.

                  The advantages are that the original bucket stays clean and all the mess is in the complete bucket. Also, you can keep various buckets at hand with different grits already to go.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by vpt
                    Whats wrong with slow?
                    Besides taking longer, it seems that the result would be indeterminate/nonuniform depending on the shape of the parts.

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