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Reamer Evaluation and Refurbishment

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  • #16
    Originally posted by smalltime
    NO.............


    Precisely.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Rosco-P
      The OP doesn't state what kind of reamer he's using.
      As I understand it, there is some differentiation between chucking and machine
      reamers. A chucking reamer is said to be one with a short lead at the start
      and a parallel shank. Whereas a machine reamer is said to be one with only
      a very slight lead and a Morse Taper shank.

      Based on these descriptions, my newfound reamers are almost all chucking
      types, plus a couple of hand reamers (identified by the square drive on their
      shank.)

      .

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by EddyCurr
        As I understand it, there is some differentiation between chucking and machine
        reamers. A chucking reamer is said to be one with a short lead at the start
        and a parallel shank. Whereas a machine reamer is said to be one with only
        a very slight lead and a Morse Taper shank.

        Based on these descriptions, my newfound reamers are almost all chucking
        types, plus a couple of hand reamers (identified by the square drive on their
        shank.)

        .
        Doesn't matter, you wouldn't understand it.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by tdmidget
          Doesn't matter, you wouldn't understand it.
          Why so nasty?


          The OP doesn't state what kind of reamer he's using. In any case, a belt sander seems a coarse method of re-newing the cutting edge or a machine or chucking reamer and doesn't address any damage or wear along its length.
          this doesn't apply to a reamer with a taper, ie hand reamers, but on chucking or machine reamers (same thing insofar as how they work is concerned) essentially Bob is right. At least insofar as the geometry of the ends need not be perfect....although i like a much finer finish on a cutting edge than from a belt sander

          Obviously its desirable that cutting edges are identical as would done with a T&CG, the cutting does take place on the end with the sides guiding the reamer in bore. So you hand sharpened a reamer and one tooth is significantly proud of the others and does all the cutting? So what? It'll work same that a D bit works....not ideal, but not trash worthy either.

          Reamers in my experience last just about forever if taken care of - not banged around, minimal material removed, used at low speeds and with cutting oil. I've lots going on 20 years of use and they're still sharp. It takes a long time to wear the end, the sides (which essentially guide not cut) wear so little its negligible, at least that I've seen....I'd bet they'd have to have been resharpened down to stubs before side wear became an issue. Dings or abuse on the sides could be stoned out by hand with no adverse affect - remember its cutting on the end. Mic them if you're concerned about side wear.

          Try taking a dull, old one with rust and with some care you can make it cut well with sharpening by hand.

          Difference between chucking & machine? my understanding is chucking reamers have a longer shank there to provide a small amount of flexibility - ie enough that if your drill chuck is .004" eccentric it will still follow the bore. The length of the shaft to dia is defined somewhere - they're not long because the maker expects you to need to ream an 8" deep 3/8 hole lol. You can get chucking reamers in straight shank or MT. Machine reamers otoh have a short shank and are meant for use in more exact tooling or floating tooling. afaik there isn't a difference to the business end....maybe some of the commercial shop veterans will offer opinions.
          Last edited by Mcgyver; 01-05-2012, 08:37 AM.
          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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          • #20
            Re: "You wouldn't understand it",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

            Man,,, some people just gotta be the miserable know it alls at times.

            Guess being unhappy with ones self produces out bursts against others!!

            This type of thing is not needed here !!!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by tdmidget
              Doesn't matter, you wouldn't understand it.
              Sounds more like you don't know how to explain it

              Personally I've resharpened reamers (the ones that are interchangeable to the end of a Morse taper shank) with perfect results. Sometimes by hand using a bench grinder or with a diamond wheel sharpening fixture -thingie. The hand sharpened I tend to use on a drill press or a manual mill as I would like to have a reamer on a CNC that will cut on every edge, makes it more easy/faster.
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

              Comment


              • #22
                I tend to like consistent predictable results, so I'll use a fixture.
                On most of the reamers I've used, granted mostly stub reamers, but also some chucking reamers, one of the lands is slightly advanced or retarded from the rest to keep the reamer from chattering in the hole. This is on straight reamers.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by sasquatch
                  Re: "You wouldn't understand it",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

                  Man,,, some people just gotta be the miserable know it alls at times.

                  Guess being unhappy with ones self produces out bursts against others!!

                  This type of thing is not needed here !!!
                  Read the post.
                  ". Whereas a machine reamer is said to be one with only
                  a very slight lead and a Morse Taper shank."

                  So if it had a Jarno taper it would not be a machine reamer? He's looking at the wrong end to make that determination. Regardless of taper, shank shape , what ever the difference is at the cutting end. If one turned the shank on a Morse tapered reamer to cylindrical would it not still be a machine reamer? "Chucking " merely describes the shank as one that can be used in virtually any machine.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by tdmidget
                    Read the post.
                    He's looking at the wrong end to make that determination.
                    Nice that YOU were born knowing that, and didn't have to have it explained to you.

                    Others didn't have your advantages, and an explanation, instead of an obnoxious blow-off, helps out.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

                    Comment

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