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It's cute anyway....

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  • It's cute anyway....

    ....not sure if it's $945 cute though,Grizzlys new H/V bench mill.

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/Mini...cal-Mill/G0727
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    No dimensions. :-( But is "Cute". :-)
    ...lew...

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    • #3
      Dimensions here http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2012/Main/550

      Bob

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      • #4
        Well, when you consider that's what a new aftermarket vertical head for an Atlas horizontal goes for...

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        • #5
          Either the power cord is made from 2" thick cable or this baby is pretty tiny? But I'll tell ya, I could find a lot.............strike that. I might be able to find a use for that.
          - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
          Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

          It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

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          • #6
            Looks to me like the vertical head is out way past the table. ...or even the end of the knee.

            How you gonna do vertical milling with that? Hand hold the work piece?

            What am I missing?
            Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lynnl
              Looks to me like the vertical head is out way past the table. ...or even the end of the knee.

              How you gonna do vertical milling with that? Hand hold the work piece?

              What am I missing?

              It looks like the top ram moves back to use the vertical head, I basing this on the second web site picture of the unit.
              jack

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lynnl
                Looks to me like the vertical head is out way past the table. ...or even the end of the knee.

                How you gonna do vertical milling with that? Hand hold the work piece?

                What am I missing?
                The ram slides back for vertical milling.
                Ernie (VE7ERN)

                May the wind be always at your back

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                • #9
                  Ah so, I didn't think about the ram sliding back. That'd do it.
                  Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                  • #10
                    It's $795.00 in the page with dimensions. I wouldn't call it cute. Just boxes upon boxes,but I'll bet it would out perform the Atlas,which I think IS a very cute little mill.

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                    • #11
                      its a good deal ..similar worn out 1940s centec 2A mill with optional verticle head, here, goes for £500+

                      i think it would sell well over here

                      all the best.markj

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                      • #12
                        I've been eyeing this mill myself. It does lack a lot of the features of the more expensive verticals that Grizzly sells, but if you planned to use the horizontal feature often it might be a good buy. Also it looks more rigid than the G8689 "mini mills" which are just attached via the column. For less than $1k, you can do a lot of stuff. Add a dividing head and you can be making decent sized gears for less than the base price of a more expensive vertical.

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                        • #13
                          Based upon my experience with the Atlas mill I had,if there was some way you could rig up an outboard support connecting the ram to the knee,it would make the mill a lot more rigid. On my Atlas,the knee would jerk sideways in any kind of a real cut. It did originally have the outboard support,but I didn't have it with my machine. I could have made one,but the #4 Burke that came along soon negated the problem. It was my first REAL mill,and capable of doing real work.

                          This Grizzly looks much more beefy than the Atlas,but the weight designated to it makes me wonder: less than 300#. I don't know the weight of the Atlas as I got rid of it in the early 70's. I DO like the vertical head very much. It is a LOT more substantial than the vertical head accessory that could be had for the Atlas.

                          I wonder how much trouble removing the motor is? If you could buy an extra motor unit,it would be very handy. They'd probably want more for an extra unit than the mill cost in the first place. That's how spare parts usually run.

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                          • #14
                            As ScubaSteve points out, it does seem aimed specifically at users who need a horizontal overarm. I find it interesting someone decided to design a new machine with a plain (no quill) vertical milling head. Given its size, though, it is not particularly limited by the fact. You also have to figure anyone that might buy this already has a bench drill. Gears are the obvious draw, but what else might a small machine with true overarm and outboard support excel at? There won't be any large slab mills going on here, so the focus is on specialty operations... anything to suggest other than gear cutting?

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Arthur.Marks
                              There won't be any large slab mills going on here
                              Why not?

                              All you would need is an overarm support and off you go.... I have a similar-sized machine, and I use a 2" wide slab milling cutter on it. I have a 4" which I have not tried mostly because I thought the arbor was too short for it..

                              Slab mills shear, and probably apply less pressure than a lot of straight tooth and side milling cutters.
                              CNC machines only go through the motions

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