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Homemade surface grinder info

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by jugs
    Not true,
    I've seen plenty of perfect machines go for peanuts because some idiot in a suit made a dumb decision
    hah....

    Suits SCRAP good unused tools and machines, because it is easier to take the tax writeoff than try to sell them.

    Mebbe YOU got a goodie from a corporate source..... I'd bet a good deal of money that out of 100 available items "out there", maybe 2 or 3 of them at most fit your description..... the rest have "something" wrong with them.

    BTW, "suits" are idiots, in general.... agree 100% with that as regards business decisions. As regards decisions on how THEY are gonna run off with all the money, well, they do quite a bit better at that part.

    Originally posted by PixMan
    Commercial shops don't always sell off machines just because they've worn it out. Probably more-often it's a case of they need the room and don't use it much, or needed a bigger/more-productive machine.
    Yeah, but WHICH one they get rid of is usually the one that works the worst..... they don't usually keep worn-out and sell the best.

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  • jugs
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers
    Not applicable.....

    If it was still good they would keep using it!

    There is ALWAYS some problem, the key is knowing if it's a big one or a little one.
    Not true,
    I've seen plenty of perfect machines go for peanuts because some idiot in a suit made a dumb decision

    Leave a comment:


  • PixMan
    replied
    Commercial shops don't always sell off machines just because they've worn it out. Probably more-often it's a case of they need the room and don't use it much, or needed a bigger/more-productive machine.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by justanengineer
    Your point that I deleted is very well taken, but you forgot

    4. Buy a used machine that you dont need to refurbish.
    Not applicable.....

    If it was still good they would keep using it!

    There is ALWAYS some problem, the key is knowing if it's a big one or a little one.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by tdmidget
    Surface grinders do not turn 10,00 RPM. This could only be for an ID grinder.
    True enough, but of course it does not "have" to be spun that fast, that is just what it is rated for. This was likely used for a diamond dicing saw used cutting glass or silicon wafers. The wheel end is 1.25" diameter so would be a bit large for an ID grinder. I only tossed the offer out as it would offer someone building a grinder of any sort a set of very nice bearings as a base for starting a build. Just a thought.

    Leave a comment:


  • sasquatch
    replied
    Impressive projects, thanks for posting those!!

    Leave a comment:


  • justanengineer
    replied
    [QUOTE=J
    The real question is what way gets a better grinder? (Unless you like building machines, of course.)

    1) build from scratch

    2) buy used and refurbish.

    3) Buy griz etc....

    [/QUOTE]

    Your point that I deleted is very well taken, but you forgot

    4. Buy a used machine that you dont need to refurbish.

    Ive seen many shops that have had really nice grinders which were rarely used but well maintained and accurate for that occasional job.

    I also recently placed a "joke" bid on a Doall 618, one of the best small grinders IMHO, that had been professionally rebuilt/painted for the military yet was actually never stored outside. Governmentliquidation.com sold it for ~$180 in what could be considered perfect condition. I kicked myself thoroughly when I realized I missed the closing of that auction by a few hours.
    Last edited by justanengineer; 01-08-2012, 09:23 AM.

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  • Peter N
    replied
    This chap made one, and very interesting it was too:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3K3Vo...eature=channel


    We also had quit an 'interesting' discussion about it on here some 4 years ago
    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=31710

    Leave a comment:


  • jackary
    replied
    Here is one I made.




    Alan

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  • tdmidget
    replied
    Originally posted by alanganes
    I do not recall the details of the grinder in that article, but if you are interested in building a grinder, and are interested, I may have spindle you could base it on. This is a "real" highspeed grinder spindle (rated for ~10K rpm, IIRC) that I picked up some;place along the way. I even have the filter/mist lube unit that goes with it. You don't say where you are located, but if you by some chance are anywhere in the vicinity of NE Massachusetts (USA) you can have the thing. It is currently in the "toss-to-scrap" pile as I am sick of tripping over it. A pic and more info here:
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v4...t=IMG_3857.jpg

    Free to take if you care to pick it up. It's heavy and somewhat large and would be a bit pricey to ship, I suspect.
    Surface grinders do not turn 10,000 RPM. This could only be for an ID grinder.
    Last edited by tdmidget; 01-08-2012, 10:25 PM.

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  • tronica
    replied
    Thanks alan for the offer, but im in Missouri, that might be a bit of a drive :P, But i do appreciate the offer. And thanks for the reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • taydin
    replied
    I am following this topic with great interest!

    Here is a reason for wanting to build a surface grinder instead of buying one. In my country, you can't buy small shop type surface grinders. The cheapest to be found is more than $10,000 and weighs more than 4 tons.

    One question about the motor coupling. Instead of trying to get a low vibration motor, isn't it easier to place the shaft into precision bearings and drive it with a belt? The thinking is that the belt will mostly absorb the motor vibrations.

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by tronica
    Im pondering building the surface grinder from the May/June HSM 06. One question i have is the author doesn't specify motor requirments. Does anyone have any insight on the requirements for the motor? Thanks
    I do not recall the details of the grinder in that article, but if you are interested in building a grinder, and are interested, I may have spindle you could base it on. This is a "real" highspeed grinder spindle (rated for ~10K rpm, IIRC) that I picked up some;place along the way. I even have the filter/mist lube unit that goes with it. You don't say where you are located, but if you by some chance are anywhere in the vicinity of NE Massachusetts (USA) you can have the thing. It is currently in the "toss-to-scrap" pile as I am sick of tripping over it. A pic and more info here:
    http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v4...t=IMG_3857.jpg

    Free to take if you care to pick it up. It's heavy and somewhat large and would be a bit pricey to ship, I suspect.

    Leave a comment:


  • tronica
    replied
    Thanks dp for the reply, the thought of using a radial arm has crossed my mind a few times.

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  • dp
    replied
    I hesitate to bring this up again because of the derisive response it received the first time round by the narrower minded, but I modified slightly a radial arm saw to function as a "poor man's surface grinder". My intention was to improve on the finish I was getting from a belt sander, not to create precision dimensioned parts with a surface flat to an angstrom. It works very well, in fact. I simply placed an x-y table on the RAS, put a balanced grinding wheel on the motor shaft, and I had two options to grind: Using the x-y table, motorized with an electric drill, or using the RAS over-arm to rough things in. Despite all the crap I got for it, it works exceptionally well, and far better than a belt sander for non-precision final finish work. Fast, too, and I didn't have to give up any rare floor space as I already have two RAS in the shop.

    I also used that same RAS to create a surface planer for wood working using a belt sander belt and that works so well I should patent it. I wanted a way to mill wood to make ukulele sound boards, sides, and backs. RASs are like shapers - no end to the ways they can be used.

    Leave a comment:

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