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What Drill Press for Metalworking?

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  • aboard_epsilon
    replied
    Originally posted by DR
    What operation are you doing with the upside down drill chuck?
    its just a weird drill chuck ..its like that ..it was built like that

    and awkward to use ....you have to put the bit into it before you put the thing into the mt2 quill...if i can remember right.



    all the best.markj

    Leave a comment:


  • psomero
    replied
    Originally posted by Mermaid
    3) The table could not be set square to the spindle axis (i.e. square to the column viewed from the side). I had to install a 0.006" shim behind the top of the table support arm to square it.


    IIRC, some drill presses have the table angled upward so when you're really pushing a drill hard, the deflection of the table from the down force gets you about perpendicular to the spindle.

    The early-80's vintage Clausing DP we have at work is set up this way.

    I'm not nuts about it because it means that when you're using small drills, your holes aren't going to be straight. It's also somewhat obvious if you're using the machine as a second op setup for countersinking holes. One side of the hole winds up with a larger chamfer than the other.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr Stan
    Guest replied
    epsilon,

    Now that's a drill press and quite a buy for 100 ponds.

    Stan

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by aboard_epsilon

    .................................................. .................................................. .............


    all the best.markj

    What operation are you doing with the upside down drill chuck?

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Originally posted by Mermaid
    .................................................. ............................................

    I can't afford high end tooling at this stage.

    .................................................. ...........................................

    Over time most of us have figured out we can't afford anything but high end tooling.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mermaid
    replied
    Sorry for the typo. It IS 135°! The Mastercraft drill bit sets are APR 18 years old and seem to be of good quality. I have a 135° split point 1/16-1/2" by 64ths cobalt and a 118° H.S.S. set. I can't afford high end tooling at this stage. I'm trying to buy items that will do a good job and are cost effective. In this day and age, that usually means Chinese. Some of their stuff is actually quite good although sometimes it's a crap shoot. Look what happened with the King drill press!

    Leave a comment:


  • aboard_epsilon
    replied
    btw ..on the quill at the side there will be a stud with a locknut on it .

    this takes up the slack ..but in practice ..you have to leave it loose or the quil gets tight at different positions in its travel ..so useless device.

    here's what replaced mine ..best £100 i ever spent...table winds down so that there is two feet of clearence..rough cast finish was probably because it was a "war-finish" machine







    all the best.markj
    Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 01-07-2012, 12:01 PM.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Typo, split points are 135 not 113 degree.

    1. First mistake get rid of the Canadian Tire drill bits, imported crap that you find in every hardware big box store these days, they haven't sold decent ones for years. They are OK for doing non-critical repairs etc. but not up to machine shop standards.

    2. King is just an importer of Chinese made tooling, some good some bad, zero quality control. It would be better to call them sooner rather then later.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mermaid
    replied
    I live in Peterborough, Ontario, Canada.

    I favor 113° split point bits though I also use standard 118°. I bought two drill bit sets from Canadian Tire plus an odd set and individual bits from various sources. Some are probably Chinese. However, they all seem to run dead true and work very well. I use a cross vice almost exclusively to hold and position my work. I always spot my holes and always step drill critical holes.

    I used to have a 12" Trade Master drill press and encountered little chatter or much in the way of drift. It in a pinch, it was even possible to do light milling . I replaced the Trade Master with the King primarily because the price was right and I felt that a heavier more powerful drill press would be more rigid and provide better accuracy as well as greater capacity. I also wanted a rotating table to aid in setting up my work. Boy, was I wrong!!

    I haven't contacted King in regard to the quill problem. While I'm sure that they would replace the press under warranty, I'd just be replacing one hunk of junk with another. Why go through all the hassle? The thing weighs 120lb and I don't have a car. It's also Winter.

    By the way, the only way to easily tighten the quill tolerance would be to hard chrome the quill. That would involve removal of the spindle and another set of bearings. With all the other problems with the machine it is questionable whether it's worth the bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by macona
    .003 on a drill press is nothing unless you are drilling with .030 carbide bits.

    What kind of bits are you using? Good name brand or chinese crap, screw machine length or jobbers? 118 or 135 split point. All will make a difference in your hole. Are you spotting before drilling? Not a center drill for a lathe, a spot drill.

    Precision drilling on a drill press without fixtures and drill bushing is not going to happen. Holes that are free drilled on press should not be expected to be very accurate.

    Remember, drilling will leave you with an inaccurate hole. Thats what boring and reaming are for.
    All too true.

    A drill can "wander" if it pivots on either end of the chisel point. It may not be much better on a mill-drill or a turret mill either as the chucks are not always too reliable or accurate and there is some "slop" or clearance in the quill-head fit.

    A good marking out and centre-punching is a lot more effective than some might believe. It works on all hand drills, pedestal drills as well as mill-drills and turret mills. And just about any drill bit will work with it.

    The ideal way to get a drilled hole accurately placed is to rough drill it, bore it and follow up with the finishing drill.

    Other-wise make and use a drilling jig or fixture to guide and constrain the drill in place.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    I gotta admit, I've been out to Lost Creek Machine more than a couple times. This drill press has been sitting there every time, which surprises me... http://www.lostcreekmachine.com/imag...TJ50_10604.JPG Helluva deal for 160 bucks compared to these things I see in the big box hardware stores (which sounds like what you have now). Never measured the spindle or anything, I'm just sayin'. I do tend to agree that you may be expecting a little much from a drill press. One of those little mills or a mill/drill would probably do you well. I feel like those machines are what killed any semblance of the smaller drill press market. All that is left are heavy, very expensive industrial presses and uber-junky, low grade consumer stuff. I mean, seriously... I see these drill presses at Home Depot with plastic pulley wheels and they look like a joke. Really, really bad IMO. The only one I can say I'm half curious of is this 12" Delta: http://www.toolbarn.com/delta-dp350.html?ref=base It has been around a while. Tends to get somewhat good comments from users.
    Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 01-05-2012, 10:57 PM.

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Mermaid,,,, Have you contacted the "KING" sales rep???

    You haven't posted where you are, or if you've contacted King or the sales rep in your'e area.

    Why not contact them ' explain the problem' see what they say.

    I have a pretty good sales rep in my area, but haven't talked with him for a couple of months.

    Go after the company!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Mermaid
    I have replaced the stock drill chuck mandrel with an LFA 5/8" Super Chuck on a Jacobs arbor. I have achieved < 0.001' run-out. The problem is the sloppy fit between the quill and the head. No use having a true chuck and spindle if the quill slops around. I have been considering replacing the King drill press with a Grizzly G8689 mini mill.
    In that case have you considered the Mini-mill that LMS offers?

    http://littlemachineshop.com/product...ory=1387807683

    The Grizz version has the tilting column which isn't very ridgid.It also has the older plastic gear drivetrain and an MT#3 spindle.I've got the HF version which is basically the same.One of the first things I changed was the gear train,swapped it over to a V-belt drive which was a vast improvement.

    The LMS version has a solid column(no tilt) and a brushless servo drive instead of the DC drive and plastic gear train it is also an R-8 spindle.
    Last edited by wierdscience; 01-05-2012, 08:26 PM.

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  • macona
    replied
    .003 on a drill press is nothing unless you are drilling with .030 carbide bits.

    What kind of bits are you using? Good name brand or chinese crap, screw machine length or jobbers? 118 or 135 split point. All will make a difference in your hole. Are you spotting before drilling? Not a center drill for a lathe, a spot drill.

    Precision drilling on a drill press without fixtures and drill bushing is not going to happen. Holes that are free drilled on press should not be expected to be very accurate.

    Remember, drilling will leave you with an inaccurate hole. Thats what boring and reaming are for.

    Leave a comment:


  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Mark out and centre-punch your hole positions. Start off with a smaller drill as it will be "drawn to the centre-punch mark. Follow up with larger drill/s.

    It even works on or for hand-held portable drills.

    Leave a comment:

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