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  • #16
    Originally posted by danlb
    If the slot is going the full length of the rod then the idea of running a slitting saw the length of the rod is perfect.

    If the slit is going only 3/4 of the length, then you would be able to come close by running the saw down the length till the center of the saw passes the 3/4 mark.

    If the end of the slot needs to be 90 degrees and square, you will need to use some sort of scraper or broach to get rid of the final curve.

    Dan
    Cutting parallel to the end face of the rod, not the length. A slot/slit across the width of the rod, not the length. Looking at the side of the rod will let you look down into the slot. Looking down the length, you will see only an edge of the slot.

    Pops

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    • #17
      Slitting Saw

      That's easy then. Use a vise jaw on the fixed side that has a V groove to keep the parts all the same height and horizontal. Stick the rod out the side of the vise 3/4 or so with an end stop and run the slitting saw through in one pass - full depth.
      Kansas City area

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Toolguy
        That's easy then. Use a vise jaw on the fixed side that has a V groove to keep the parts all the same height and horizontal. Stick the rod out the side of the vise 3/4 or so with an end stop and run the slitting saw through in one pass - full depth.
        That is what I am now envisioning. All I have to do is get a vise on my lathe. hmmmmm More tool building? Aw, shucks.

        Let's see if this will help some of the others envision the slit I want:



        Pops

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        • #19
          OK, you are going to cut a slot 0.675" deep ACROSS a 7/8-14 threaded rod. Facts:
          7/8" = 0.875".
          0.875" - 0.675" = 0.200" left after this cut.
          But the depth of a 14 TPI thread is about 0.046" so you will have only about 0.154" left of solid material below the thread's minor diameter. That's only slightly more than 1/8". So you will have little of the strength of the original rod left.

          How would I do it? Definitely a slitting saw. On the mill. Saw horizontal in the vertical spindle and hold the work vertical in a vise. Probably two passes but you may get away with one. If doing a bunch I would arrange a stop in or below the vise jaws so I can load each one quickly to the same vertical position. Use aluminum scraps to protect threads in vise jaws. Or three nuts, two locked together at top of vise jaws and one loose below near the bottom of the vise jaws.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
            OK, you are going to cut a slot 0.675" deep ACROSS a 7/8-14 threaded rod. Facts:
            7/8" = 0.875".
            0.875" - 0.675" = 0.200" left after this cut.
            But the depth of a 14 TPI thread is about 0.046" so you will have only about 0.154" left of solid material below the thread's minor diameter. That's only slightly more than 1/8". So you will have little of the strength of the original rod left.

            How would I do it? Definitely a slitting saw. On the mill. Saw horizontal in the vertical spindle and hold the work vertical in a vise. Probably two passes but you may get away with one. If doing a bunch I would arrange a stop in or below the vise jaws so I can load each one quickly to the same vertical position. Use aluminum scraps to protect threads in vise jaws. Or three nuts, two locked together at top of vise jaws and one loose below near the bottom of the vise jaws.
            The small portion "below" the cut will never have any pressure on it. It has to carry only its own weight. It acts only as a gude for the cutter to slide up into.

            My mill is a little HF 3-in-1, the little "Yellow Boy." Round column, so it is really hard to get it to lock against side forces. Not much power, so I have to really baby it. Top speed 2500 rated, probably a bit slower than that. I might try that anyway and feed the rod into the blade from the front, rather than the side.

            It is going to be interesting, I can tell. I have a production batch going together now, so I won't get to experiment with the new design for awhile. I'll post back when I do get into this experiment.

            In the meantime, keep 'em coming, please. I'm learning metal isn't as forgiving as electrons.

            Pops

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