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What to put behind the lathe?

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  • #16
    I have a piece of 3/8 thick corrugated plastic board running from the back of the lathe over to the wall, then up the wall. The horizontal part is a bit lower than the surface of the stand, so whatever swarf etc collects there can be swept out past the tailstock end and into a box or bucket. That helps me keep the area cleared. The plastic can be wiped easily, but I don't know how long it would stand up to a solvent wetted rag.

    The corrugated board you'd normally find is about 1/8 inch thick, called tenplast, or coroplast- probably called some other things as well. The 3/8 material I have was used as sign board, so a sign maker would probably have it or be able to get it. I got my supply fairly cheap (free) so I've been using it for these various purposes. It might be expensive to actually buy though-
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Chris165
      Thanks for the picture. That is one of the neatest little saws I have seen. I'm assuming the saws are not manufactured anymore. Is it something that could possibly be built with a salvaged chop saw base and a motor/right angle gear box and build a column, or is it more complicated?
      The saw is extremely rigid and the saw turns very slowly, only about 40RPM. I doubt any higher speed machine could be rebuilt rugged enough to handle a blade like that.

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      • #18
        My South Bend has plexiglass mounted to the back and I saw a small SB on the internet some where that had a very nice looking backsplash made from aluminum tread plate.

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        • #19
          If you have shelving behind - an old pull-down projector screen will do it. I had one of those over the window in my first workshop, which was little more than a shed. Got rid of it when I built my current workshop coz I built it deliberately without windows.
          Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

          Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
          Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
          Monarch 10EE 1942

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          • #20
            I hung an old shower curtain behind my machine, with a life-sized photo of my Mother-in-law glued to it.
            No good deed goes unpunished.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Chris165
              Thanks for the picture. That is one of the neatest little saws I have seen. I'm assuming the saws are not manufactured anymore. Is it something that could possibly be built with a salvaged chop saw base and a motor/right angle gear box and build a column, or is it more complicated?
              Chris.

              It is a cold saw - usually with HSS blades - and slices most metals very quickly with a well-finished square end. I am continually amazed at how much abuse it takes at my metal supplier.

              Here is a sample from OZ:
              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Me...ldsaws-Ferrous

              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S816

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              • #22
                Saltmine, I can imagine that you threw in extra coolant from time to time
                I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                • #23
                  Possibly some pieces of corrugated galvanized steel roofing standing on end, with a tray at the bottom, would make a good backsplash. Those roofing pieces usually come in 2 foot wide sections, and you could simply overlap sections until you have the width you need. Similar corrugated roofing panels come in fiberglass and other plastic materials, and would be easier to cut. They may also be available in aluminum , especially if you can find someone who dismantles old mobile homes.

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                  • #24
                    My lathe came with a pretty nice idea - piece of sheet metal about 18 inches wide attached 6 inches behind and to the back of the carriage, bottom angled down so chips fall in the chip tray. The sheild moves with the carriage and keeps most of the mess under control.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                      The saw is extremely rigid and the saw turns very slowly, only about 40RPM. I doubt any higher speed machine could be rebuilt rugged enough to handle a blade like that.
                      You should seriously consider moving it if you value your lathe. Even slower cold saws still throw up a ton of grit and debris.

                      As to the OPs question, I would recommend either moving the lathe out from the wall or simply screwing some plywood to the wall. Whatever you do, you want it to be replaceable for when (not if) something gets tossed at it at a rather high speed. IMHO drywall and other things "cosmetic" do not belong in a shop, period. If you want a showroom to display your toys, build one. If you want a garage, build a garage. If you want a shop, especially if you do much welding/cutting, build a proper shop.
                      Last edited by justanengineer; 01-07-2012, 11:45 PM.
                      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                      • #26
                        I find a piece of tin by the headstock will catch most of the spray.



                        Easy to clean too.
                        Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by justanengineer
                          You should seriously consider moving it if you value your lathe. Even slower cold saws still throw up a ton of grit and debris.
                          I dont know what you are cutting in your cold saws but this one does not throw grit or debris, just little curly metal shavings..

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                          • #28
                            And they barely "throw" at all...

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by lakeside53
                              And they barely "throw" at all...

                              Thats true, almost all the chips fall through the hole in the base and drop onto the metal tray underneath.

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                              • #30
                                Paint it.

                                Phil

                                Originally posted by goose
                                I'm currently re-sheetrocking the shop and want to put a handle on the mess. I figured maybe plastic laminate or Masonite might be a good surface, although plastic laminate can be pricey. Suggestions? Non-porous to wipe clean ? or will that allow oil to drip down to the floor?

                                Thanx,

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