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What to put behind the lathe?

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  • Bill736
    replied
    Possibly some pieces of corrugated galvanized steel roofing standing on end, with a tray at the bottom, would make a good backsplash. Those roofing pieces usually come in 2 foot wide sections, and you could simply overlap sections until you have the width you need. Similar corrugated roofing panels come in fiberglass and other plastic materials, and would be easier to cut. They may also be available in aluminum , especially if you can find someone who dismantles old mobile homes.

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  • darryl
    replied
    Saltmine, I can imagine that you threw in extra coolant from time to time

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris165
    Thanks for the picture. That is one of the neatest little saws I have seen. I'm assuming the saws are not manufactured anymore. Is it something that could possibly be built with a salvaged chop saw base and a motor/right angle gear box and build a column, or is it more complicated?
    Chris.

    It is a cold saw - usually with HSS blades - and slices most metals very quickly with a well-finished square end. I am continually amazed at how much abuse it takes at my metal supplier.

    Here is a sample from OZ:
    Become a Machineryhouse Mate! Australia's leading supplier of Engineering, Metal & Wood working machinery. Buy online or in-store.


    Become a Machineryhouse Mate! Australia's leading supplier of Engineering, Metal & Wood working machinery. Buy online or in-store.

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  • saltmine
    replied
    I hung an old shower curtain behind my machine, with a life-sized photo of my Mother-in-law glued to it.

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  • Peter.
    replied
    If you have shelving behind - an old pull-down projector screen will do it. I had one of those over the window in my first workshop, which was little more than a shed. Got rid of it when I built my current workshop coz I built it deliberately without windows.

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  • BigMike782
    replied
    My South Bend has plexiglass mounted to the back and I saw a small SB on the internet some where that had a very nice looking backsplash made from aluminum tread plate.

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  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris165
    Thanks for the picture. That is one of the neatest little saws I have seen. I'm assuming the saws are not manufactured anymore. Is it something that could possibly be built with a salvaged chop saw base and a motor/right angle gear box and build a column, or is it more complicated?
    The saw is extremely rigid and the saw turns very slowly, only about 40RPM. I doubt any higher speed machine could be rebuilt rugged enough to handle a blade like that.

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  • darryl
    replied
    I have a piece of 3/8 thick corrugated plastic board running from the back of the lathe over to the wall, then up the wall. The horizontal part is a bit lower than the surface of the stand, so whatever swarf etc collects there can be swept out past the tailstock end and into a box or bucket. That helps me keep the area cleared. The plastic can be wiped easily, but I don't know how long it would stand up to a solvent wetted rag.

    The corrugated board you'd normally find is about 1/8 inch thick, called tenplast, or coroplast- probably called some other things as well. The 3/8 material I have was used as sign board, so a sign maker would probably have it or be able to get it. I got my supply fairly cheap (free) so I've been using it for these various purposes. It might be expensive to actually buy though-

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  • Chris165
    replied
    Thanks for the picture. That is one of the neatest little saws I have seen. I'm assuming the saws are not manufactured anymore. Is it something that could possibly be built with a salvaged chop saw base and a motor/right angle gear box and build a column, or is it more complicated?

    Leave a comment:


  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    Originally posted by Chris165

    What is the blue saw? I would love to see some more pics & info.

    I dont know who made the saw, it might have been made in NZ...here is a picture of another one that is for sale, different motor but otherwise the same as far as I can tell. 2HP, HSS blade which turns very slowly and munches through mild steel like a knife through butter!

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    I agree with RUSS, a sheet of metal is the best, and install it so it empties down into the swarf tray.

    Neatest is to take it or buy it from a sheet metal shop, and get them to fold over the edges about 1/4-3/8 all around, so you have no sharp edges, and it makes a very nice neat job, plus the fold adds a little strength to the sheet.

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  • DATo
    replied
    There are these panels (don't know what the material is called) that are used for classroom whiteboards. We bought two sheets to put behind one of our Bridegeports. The machine is located just in front of our material room which is faced with heavy gauge metal fencing (like cyclone fencing) and a sliding door made of the same material. When blowing off chips the mess would go right into the material room so we put two of these 4' X 8' panels vertically against the fencing and secured them to the fencing by drilling small holes and threading through wire and tying them off to the fence material.

    This has worked very well as the side facing the shop is quite slick and easy to wipe off. This stuff is a bit pricey but we have an outstandingly beautiful shop and were willing to pay extra for the looks of the stuff.

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  • Carld
    replied
    I stapled a heavy plastic sheet behind my mill to protect the wall from oil and chips. Now I can blow the mill off and it lands on the plastic and I can replace the plastic sheet anytime I want. Cheap and fast.

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  • Chris165
    replied
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
    I just have clear space behind mine:-

    DSCN0425 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ...the chips are easy enough to clean up and, for better or worse, I have given up on flood coolant because of the mess it makes. It is easy to get to the back of the lathe too!
    I just had some nice clean aluminum (not for long) sheared to place on top of my mdf benches and behind the lathe.

    What is the blue saw? I would love to see some more pics & info.

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  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    I just have clear space behind mine:-

    DSCN0425 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ...the chips are easy enough to clean up and, for better or worse, I have given up on flood coolant because of the mess it makes. It is easy to get to the back of the lathe too!

    Leave a comment:

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