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What to put behind the lathe?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
    I dont know what you are cutting in your cold saws but this one does not throw grit or debris, just little curly metal shavings..
    Mainly scapbinium of the steel and iron variety, but occasionally something a bit more expensive...

    They still create it. Abrasive saws make a lot. Cold saws make significantly less, but they still make it. Even your lathe makes it, its a necessary byproduct. Thinking that a machine tool creates chips, not grit and other airborne particles can be a rather dangerous assumption, especially if you begin working with any decently high concentration of lead.

    Surface grinders usually dont toss grit any significant amount, yet many shops still put them in a room completely seperated from other machines.

    My bench grinder has a vacuum attachment that catches 99.9% of the grit, but that doesnt mean I would use it within 20 ft of my lathe.

    Some people think its ok to set a chuck wrench or other tool directly on their lathe's ways, if done "carefully." I still use a wood "shelf."

    To each their own, just a recommendation. IMHO you cannot be too careful. Way oil tends to attract and hold any and all dust and grit that may be floating invisible in the shop's air. I like working on old iron, and have a very deep appreciation for preventing possible wear having had some that many would consider "worn out." Am I being overly cautious? Is there such a thing?
    Last edited by justanengineer; 01-08-2012, 11:09 AM.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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    • #32
      I built a light wooden frame covered with air-core plastic from an old political sign. The lower edge fits into the drip pan.

      The side with the guy's picture is toward the wall.
      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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      • #33
        i've set up a few different types of backstops for mills and lathes and have had pretty good results with the following:

        1. Plywood with a quality chemical-resistant lacquer like varathane, screwed to a wall behind a bridgeport. It's super cheap, looks decent, and the varathane makes the stuff basically impervious to staining and increases the dent resistance of the wood drastically.

        2. Coroplast corrugated plastic sign board material behind a mill, held to the wall with drywall screws and fender washers. It's also cheap or even free if you can find surplus material, it's chemical resistant, and lightweight. I've seen movable chip guards made out of the stuff too, which works decent because it's rigid and lightweight. It can get munched fairly easily, but is easy to replace and spare panels last forever and are light, so you can stash a bunch in a corner somewhere.

        3. Stainless sheet screwed to the wall behind a mill, custom bent stainless sheet chip/slop pan for lathe. Pricey, but probably the best looking and most durable. I guess galvanized or powdercoated steel would be nice too, because you can stick magnetic stuff to it, but corrosion may become an issue over time.

        4. Plexiglas or lexan. Expensive, but also durable and looks nice.

        5. 3+ mil plastic drop cloth for a really messy lathe job with coolant. Cheap, but basically a one-shot application that looks the most rube goldberg of them all.

        The best materials have good chemical resistance and don't get torn up very easily by flying debris. A lot of people have suitable materials just lying around, so experiment and see what works best for you.
        -paul

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        • #34
          best thing behind lathe is............. a wall...... if you MUST put something over it, so be it... the wall seems to work OK by itself.... Yes there IS a streak on it..... OK......
          CNC machines only go through the motions.

          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by J Tiers
            best thing behind lathe is............. a wall...... if you MUST put something over it, so be it... the wall seems to work OK by itself.... Yes there IS a streak on it..... OK......

            Maybe but dont most photos of large machine shops show the machines free standing?

            Besides, in a typical home shop wall space is valuable real estate for hanging stuff and I hate the thought of a half full can of paint falling off a high shelf and hitting a spinning chuck! I shudder when I see lathe tools on a rack behind the machine knowing that if it were my shop I would be someday tempted to reach over a running machine to get something.

            I really, really like my scheme of putting bench top machines back to back on a bench that I can walk right around, even more so if there is room to easily clean between the machines.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by justanengineer

              To each their own, just a recommendation. IMHO you cannot be too careful. Way oil tends to attract and hold any and all dust and grit that may be floating invisible in the shop's air. I like working on old iron, and have a very deep appreciation for preventing possible wear having had some that many would consider "worn out." Am I being overly cautious? Is there such a thing?

              "To each their own", yes thats true but I think I will be a bit relaxed on this issue. No I dont store things on the lathe ways and I dont use the nice machined top surface of the flat ways as an anvil, however I did wash all the red dragon fat off the lathe when it was new and have no intention of putting it back on.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                Maybe but dont most photos of large machine shops show the machines free standing?
                They have room. I don't.

                Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                Besides, in a typical home shop wall space is valuable real estate for hanging stuff and I hate the thought of a half full can of paint falling off a high shelf and hitting a spinning chuck! I shudder when I see lathe tools on a rack behind the machine knowing that if it were my shop I would be someday tempted to reach over a running machine to get something.
                So don't REACH over a running machine....

                All I have back there is two shelves on the lathe itself that have items for setting up on the lathe..... Chuck keys, centers, tailstock chucks, etc. Unless my reflexes improve a LOT, I doubt I will be changing chucks while the spindle is running......... YMMV, you may like to do that

                I'd like to add a rack for boring bars, etc, but it's a solid concrete wall, with a very fat mix and flint aggregate... hard to drill in, no good for putting up shelves unless they have legs.

                If you put shelves for paint etc over the lathe, you deserve what you get, which is paint on the lathe, maybe, and surely oil on the paint cans or whatever other "stuff" is put up there.

                Besides, if you are working at the lathe, why do you need the paint right then?
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by J Tiers
                  They have room. I don't.


                  Would you like to try a rearrangment of your shop? In theory of course, just for fun. See if putting a bench in the middle with your machines on or around it would free up wall space for storage?

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