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  • Moving camera mount

    Buddy of mine wants me to put together a moving camera mount like the one in the video but to his specs (to fit his equipment).

    http://www.digitaljuice.com/djtv/detail.aspx?sid=608

    My first thought is linear bearings for the bed. Can they be ran on aluminum though? He wants it to be fairly light because obviously it has to be carried all over. What is your guys professional opinion for bearing choice and bed material? Has to be smooth and dust can't effect it much.
    Andy

  • #2
    I would just do it the way people make the cnc router ways. Use angle iron or aluminum and some sealed ball bearings. ill see if i can find a picture of what i mean.

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    • #3
      If you scroll to the bottom, there is a post by Tekinika that shows what i am refering too.

      http://www.instructables.com/id/How-...-Cheaply-and-/

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      • #4
        That is good but the camera mount can't fall off if turned upside down.
        Andy

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        • #5
          Originally posted by vpt
          That is good but the camera mount can't fall off if turned upside down.
          put two on facing each other, then it will be rock solid but slide nicely each way. The last post sort of explains it.

          This is sort of the same concept, but wouldnt be as light.



          And here is another website that has better pics and explanation of the bearings and angle aluminum setup. I would build it out of aluminum box, and it would be super light weight, and still retain a lot of rigidity.

          http://woodworkerbcncrouterproject.b...1_archive.html
          Last edited by Dragons_fire; 01-10-2012, 10:43 PM.

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          • #6
            Here's a readymade solution: http://www.igus.com/wpck/default.asp...filmtechnology I just picked up one of these for a different application. Cost for 1 meter rail + carriage was $115 + shipping.

            If you're building completely from scratch, you need to deal with:
            • Noise from bearings. (If you want to record sound while shooting. The Igus bearings do generate some noise while moving.)
            • Smoothness of travel. (Horizontal) (stick/slip can ruin a good shot)
            • Levelness of rail. (A few thousandths dip in the center will be visible in the shot)
            • Rigid support. (Simplest is two tripods)

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            • #7
              I'm in the film business, but not directly associated with the camera support dept. So I went back and pulled out some sliders to see how they were constructed. The old tried and true JB slider looks to be a piece of aluminum with a couple of linear bearings bolted on. The other one has a much more complicated track arrangement, with u shaped rollers riding in a matching track. Both of these "professional" units are very expensive and NOISY. If it were me, I would think about utilizing skateboard wheels, and configuring the wheels to work in some available type track, and supported so the camera can be under-slung if needed. We have used skateboard wheels/bearings in other applications and they are quiet, smooth and CHEAP.
              Last edited by daryl bane; 01-11-2012, 10:38 AM.

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              • #8
                Pacific Bearing has a number of rail systems that might work http://www.pbclinear.com/Gliding-Sur...-Linear-Motion

                BishopWisecarver http://www.bwc.com/ has a lot of bearing based components. Their UtiliTrack rails are nice.

                bob
                Last edited by rowbare; 01-11-2012, 11:48 AM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by daryl bane
                  I'm in the film business, but not directly associated with the camera support dept. So I went back and pulled out some sliders to see how they were constructed. The old tried and true JB slider looks to be a piece of aluminum with a couple of linear bearings bolted on. The other one has a much more complicated track arrangement, with u shaped rollers riding in a matching track. Both of these "professional" units are very expensive and NOISY. If it were me, I would think about utilizing skateboard wheels, and configuring the wheels to work in some available type track, and supported so the camera can be under-slung if needed. We have used skateboard wheels/bearings in other applications and they are quiet, smooth and CHEAP.


                  Thats good information! When noise was mentioned I was thinking what the bearings could be put in or coated with. The skate wheels are great!
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Slider

                    How about skate wheels inside an alum. channel on each side and cross members to hold the channels together? It would look like a ladder and be very light.

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                    • #11
                      Do skate wheels take kindly to being turned on a lathe? Or do they gum up and tear or whatnot? Could concave the center of them and only have to run 4 on two tube tracks.
                      Andy

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                      • #12
                        How long does he want it to be, and is it intended for positioning a still camera or for video with camera in motion?

                        I used to have a camera set up so I could film from behind a guard that was mounted on a 24" full extension ball bearing drawer glide, in that case I had a couple of adjustable stops to I could retract it for removing the card, then slide it back in place for filming.
                        Would be easy to attach a tripod mount, and threaded rod/nut to it for accurate wide range positioning. Could also be stacked for more reach if needed.

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                        • #13
                          Its been awhile since we fooled with them(skateboard wheels). You would probably have to do some experimentation. Like maybe use a sandpaper cartridge roll on a toolpost grinder type of thing. Or maybe putting them in the freezer? I don't know.
                          Last edited by daryl bane; 01-11-2012, 10:07 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by daryl bane
                            Its been awhile since we fooled with them(skateboard wheels). You would probably have to do some experimentation. Like maybe use a sandpaper cartridge roll on a toolpost grinder type of thing. Or maybe putting them in the freezer? I don't know.
                            Oddly enough, I turned one down just about 2 weeks ago for use in a gate guide repair. They are clear wheels with an internal rigid structure and came from some cheap in-line skates that were being thrown out. I needed it turned down to just above the skeleton and was afraid it would rip loose. However, it turned smoothly with sharp HSS and did not result in any problems at all.
                            Russ
                            Master Floor Sweeper

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                            • #15
                              You might look at using makerslide.

                              http://www.makerslide.com/

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