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cobbled together 240v circuit

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  • cobbled together 240v circuit

    I've got a cute little motor I want to use for a ceiling fan (0.41A). Problem is it's 230 volt. PITA to run to my main panel so what I'm thinking is scab one line each from two other circuits (obviously from different legs). I would use intermittent circuits like the garbage disposer and dishwasher. How bad an idea is this?

  • #2
    Bad idea.

    Just get a small 120 to 240v autotransformer. 500VA would probably enough, 750 would be more than.

    I have a 240v german metal halide light fixture that I use in my shop and I use a small transformer to run it.

    Like this:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Reversible-A...ht_4598wt_1344

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    • #3
      Rearrange your panel breakers and use "half-size" breakers if you're out of space, or toss the motor.

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      • #4
        Hi Horst

        The following is well intended advice and not at all meant to be critical. I apologise in advance if it seems harsh as it is not meant to be.

        I think if you have to ask that question you do not have sufficient grasp of the electrical trade to be messing with it. Electricity is something I know a fair bit about, and it has been my experience over many years is it is a field where a little bit of knowledge can be a very dangerous thing. When in doubt seek the services of a pro.

        Regards …. Bert

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        • #5
          well, you are right (a little knowledge), and I think I have (sought advice) and yes, you were critical (while adding nothing useful). I will go the transformer route. Thank you

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          • #6
            If you do as you propose and there is a fault, one breaker will open up and the other will likely remain in resulting in an energized conductor to the equipment which you will probably discover when you stick your fingers into when you start working on the electrical side of it. It also will be against any electrical codes that apply to your location.
            Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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            • #7
              What sort of motor are you wanting to use? Is it an actual ceiling fan motor?
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              • #8
                Also, when your house burns down and the insurance company discovers that you had done non-code electrical work, the will rub their hands in glee at having a legitimate excuse not to pay. An then there's:
                DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE
                Not only will this kill you
                but it will hurt really bay
                while you're dying.
                "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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                • #9
                  The reason I ask about the motor is that ceiling fan motors are impedance protected. That means that they can be fully stalled without burning up. To pass UL certification they must be able to be fully stalled safely for 15 days.
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                  • #10
                    you can not wire a 240v load between two independantly fused 120v circuits for many safty reasons, One being electrocuting whoever does work next on that circuit after turning the circuit off. Another being a fault won't trip both circuits, and you may end up with a brownout condition on the 'faulted' circuit that may damage equipment, Including potentialy causing fire hazards with other motors/loads, even if your fan motor is fully protected itself.
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                    • #11
                      Of course you can wire it that way but it is a very poor idea and illegal as well. It is also not a good idea to mount a motor directly below the ceiling that isn't inherently protected from bursting into flames in the event of a bearing problem.

                      However, if the fan motor is a regular ceiling fan motor it will run at about half speed on 120 vac without problems.
                      Last edited by Evan; 01-20-2012, 01:02 AM.
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                      • #12
                        Ok Thanks, I came to the right place.

                        Evan; No it is not a ceiling fan motor. It is from "Bodine Electric Company". I have seen these used with gear reductions.

                        Data Plate:
                        TYPE: NSI-13
                        VOLTS: 230
                        HZ: 50 PH: 1
                        A: 0.41 HP: 1/50
                        AMB: 40 INS: A1
                        TIME: Cont
                        RPM: 1425
                        I was going to mount the motor on the wall ans use shafting and gears to reduce rpm and power a 12" fan blade. I hadn't thought of the motor overheating. will the fact that it is a 50 HZ motor cause an issue? Will it run faster on 60 HZ?
                        Last edited by Horst; 01-20-2012, 09:38 AM.

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                        • #13
                          bumping thread

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Horst
                            will the fact that it is a 50 HZ motor cause an issue? Will it run faster on 60 HZ?
                            Approx 1740 rpm on 60hz, at a slightly lower current.
                            Max.

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                            • #15
                              The current drawn will of course depend on the loading from the fan. It would pay to measure the current to make sure you aren't overloading the motor. i.e. the fan / housing determines the motor load; too much and it will overheat. Err on the "less" side. Another way is to measure the running speed - aim for the 1740 (or more) rpm. You might find that your cannot drive the fan/gearbox you have unless it wasall part of the motor originally.
                              Last edited by lakeside53; 01-20-2012, 12:00 PM.

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