Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Odd insert holder

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Odd insert holder

    I just purchased 2 holders and a bunch of inserts from Grizzly, they are G7028 & 29. The odd part is how the holder retains the insert, it just sits on a peg. There is no screw or clamp. These looked to me to be a WN style in the catalouge but had no designation, I tried tech service before I ordered them but could not get any info from them so I figured just order and see what comes. I've seen them now and my first thought is to just send them back but I was curious if anybody has actually used them and what they think. They are dirt cheap so it's not a big deal one way or the other. To me cutting with them looks like a disaster in the making, I have never seen anything like it before. Comments appreciated.

  • #2
    Well, at least you won't need to worry about the screw wearing out or getting lost.

    One of the other links on the search page led to this:
    http://www.atm-workshop.com/smithy1220xl.html

    The relevant part:

    "One particularly nice tooling addition I have made is the purchase of an indexable carbide lathe bit holder from Grizzly. Its part number in the Grizzly catalog is G7028 / G7029. I really like this holder and the inserts. It provides much better cutting action and finish than the traditional indexable tools sets sold by Smithy and others."

    Maybe you should give them a try and report back.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

    Comment


    • #3
      Is the peg eccentric with hex key recess?

      --Doozer
      DZER

      Comment


      • #4
        insert features

        It is not eccentric nor any hex feature, it has no features that would help the insert stay on, if you flip it over and give it a tap it will fall off.

        Comment


        • #5
          read the manual...

          http://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g7028_m.pdf
          Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

          Comment


          • #6
            thanks

            Thanks that explains a fair bit now all need in something like a slot, or hex etc to get hold of to turn it, it's smooth on top and no flat or anything on the side more ideas?

            Comment


            • #7
              These get adjusted from the bottom side. Check there. If your screw/cam doesn't have a hex/torx/screw adjustment, it missed a manufacturing operation.

              Comment


              • #8
                thanks again

                that makes sense just nothing there, I do appreciate the help I had not even thought of looking for directions, I'll see about a new screw one has the hex recess the one I had opened does not
                THANKS AGAIN

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bill McLeod
                  that makes sense just nothing there, I do appreciate the help I had not even thought of looking for directions, I'll see about a new screw one has the hex recess the one I had opened does not
                  THANKS AGAIN
                  Welcome to the Man Club!
                  Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill McLeod
                    <snip> They are dirt cheap so it's not a big deal one way or the other. To me cutting with them looks like a disaster in the making, I have never seen anything like it before. Comments appreciated.
                    Wow. I'd never seen such a weak method of holding an insert. That is for very light cuts only.

                    A WNMG style insert is capable of turning and facing without changing the orientation of the holder because of it's 80؛ included angle. A quality holder would nest the insert along one full edge and at least a portion of a secondary edge, and use some sort of clamp to keep the insert snug against the surfaces of the pocket and the seat. To clamp like that invites the disaster you've correctly predicted.



                    Spend money once. Buy the good tools once, the first time...and they don't come from Grizzly.

                    Sorry if a bit harsh, but you did invite comments.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      SEND THEM BACK. I'm with Pixman, that is a disaster in the making.

                      I've never seen anything like that, the eccentric is pretty common, or at least used to be, but there was also a top clamp. The eccentric is mainly to seat the insert properly, not hold the whole damn insert in.

                      The newer stuff is like the one Pixman has up there, a bit of a premium, but one screw, and there is a nice spring under the clamp, as you tighten, it pulls the insert back and clamps it down, loosen and the clamp pops itself up. I like those holders A LOT. Probably get a good one for around $50, big plus if it has a carbide seat. You only need to buy it once.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for backing me up on this bobw53. Here's a different view where you can perhaps see the entire clamp and how it would pull the insert back and down.



                        These holders, and negative rake inserts in general, aren't the best thing for small lathes. There are many very sharp, positive top rake style inserts available that do negate the forces, but they're not usually available cheap. Then again, quality tools don't cost, they PAY.

                        If the machine is particularly low on HP, it might be best to look for a SWLCR 083 or similar holder for the good screw-down, positive rake WCMT/WCGT 32.5x size inserts. You'll only get three corners to use instead of six with the WMNG, but they might be the better choice depending upon the lathe.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, as long as the holder is threaded anyway, why not just use a screw and put a taper on the screw head?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What you have is called a Pinloc insert system.They are availible from several different mfgs and are primarily used for light to medium finishing cuts.Nothing wrong with the system,they just aren't made for roughing or heavy interupted cuts.

                            http://www.directindustry.com/prod/s...49-536464.html

                            Look at the "Lathe toolholder Swiss"
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              wierdscience,

                              On that link you posted please notice that the Sumitomo holders are of high quality and have good hardware. Also notice that each of the Pin-Lock holders shown does use at least two of the insert's long edges to register the insert, except for the one holding a WNMG insert. That one has a top clamp.

                              The Pin-Lock style holders are very popular in Germany and other areas of Europe, and are built in such a way that they are sturdy enough to use in heavy roughing applications. The difference in those made by reputable tooling companies is that of design, quality of materials, manufacturing tolerance. So much difference in fact that they are in some circles the preferred tool to use because heavy chips can't hammer the hardware normally there clamping the insert in.

                              We Americans haven't yet grasped the concept.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X