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  • Newbie with a lathe and needing some advice

    Look what I got ! It's a charming old British Raglan 5 lathe that I rescued from the back room of a local research outfit who bought it new in the 60s as best I can determine. Not shown, but I do have the splash guard (had to take it off to strap it down to the trailer for lugging home). Also, I have a 3 jaw chuck and the 4 jaw.





    I don’t have a tool post or spanner wrench for the L-00 spindle.

    And speaking of the toolpost - how does one remove the topslide on this so that I can clean it up? It's very hard to move. Mess of rust on it as well as you can see in the picture.

    I know very little about lathes other than what I have read, so this is going to be a bit of a learning curve for me. I expect I'll be firing up lots of questions pretty soon...

    I've joined the yahoo Raglan group but it's a little quiet over there compared to here, so I figured I'd proclaim (...maybe gloat a bit) about my new acquistion here too.


    Thanks for looking.

  • #2
    Can't help you with your'e questions,, but the lathe looks quite good!!

    Pictures sure make a difference!!

    Comment


    • #3
      In removing the top slide, I'd begin by backing off the gib adjusting screws. Loosen the jam nut, then loosen the gib screws a couple or 3 turns. I'm pretty sure you crank the top slide towards you to remove it. Just keep cranking.

      Get it loose first, so you don't strip the nut. You might have to tap the top slide with a mallet while turning the handle. Spray a bunch of your favorite penetrating oil in/on the thing before starting.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by jdunmyer
        In removing the top slide, I'd begin by backing off the gib adjusting screws. Loosen the jam nut, then loosen the gib screws a couple or 3 turns. I'm pretty sure you crank the top slide towards you to remove it. Just keep cranking.

        Get it loose first, so you don't strip the nut. You might have to tap the top slide with a mallet while turning the handle. Spray a bunch of your favorite penetrating oil in/on the thing before starting.
        Thanks for the advice. I've done what you suggested - backed off the gib screws (no need to worry about locknuts on two of them seeing as they are not there !). It moved a bit more easily, then I poked a bit of oil on the partially exposed way. Moved it back and forth and then tried backing it all the way out (towards you in the picture). But it seems to hit a stop of some sort. Can't see anything obvious at the moment.

        Any other ideas?

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice, both here and a pretty good little bit here

          http://www.lathes.co.uk/raglan/index.html

          3/4 of the way down, if you had not already found it; same website has manuals etc. available

          Guessing, try it the other way (away from operator)...assuming the slide has a "U" cut out (when viewed from the top) could be the nut hitting up against the bottom of that "U"...not sure though
          Last edited by RussZHC; 01-21-2012, 07:38 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I saw a post somewhere that suggested Raglan manuals are available for download through the yahoo group. Have you retrieved a copy of said manual? There's probably reference diagrams that should provide insight to disassembly. Also, I'd suggest checking out the Raglan section at www.lathes.co.uk, there's a good bit of background info there.

            Good luck and have fun
            Cadwiz

            Comment


            • #7
              Almost certainly, crank to move the cross slide away from you, toward the back of the lathe. It should eventually run off the end of the leadscrew, at which point you should be able to slide it off the rest of the dovetail by hand...IF, as somebody else pointed out, the cross slide nut doesn't hit anything.

              It looks like a nice lathe that had quite a bit of non-abusive use when first bought, but has sat idle for an extended period. It looks like a prime candidate for resurrection.
              ----------
              Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
              Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
              Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
              There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
              Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
              Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

              Comment


              • #8
                I think it's something to do with the nut hitting the end of the cutout underneath the topslide.

                I have the manual d/l but it doesn't show any exploded views etc.

                Perhaps I have to take out the allen head screws holding the end plate and crank assy, crank the screw out of the nut toward the operator in the pic, then slide the topslide off in the other direction (toward the spindle) sans crank and endplate?

                This thing is out in my unheated garage and the temps are dropping like a stone at the moment - will check it again tomorrow morning.

                Thanks for the help !

                Hey SGW - whereabouts are you in Maine?

                Comment


                • #9
                  That is what I would suggest,removing those screws and bumping the top back with a block of wood and a hammer.Should be able to slide the top off and expose the screw at that point.

                  Nice Lathe BTW,sure is well built for it's size.
                  I just need one more tool,just one!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Nice Find..Where did you find it? I am from NB too.. Your lathe has a few characteristics similar to my Cholchester but the Compound slide is a bit different then mine. If you look up TubalCain on Utube you can watch a video on how to take it apart and clean it..He takes one apart that is very similar to yours with the allen screws in the front.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I believe John Stevenson used to work at Raglan. If you send him a message to alert him I think he could give you chapter and verse on this lathe.
                      Bill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Lewis,
                        Can't give an exact answer as it was a long time ago but seeing as it has the deep slot for the toolpost bolt I'd say that you need to release the screw plate and wind the screw out then push the slide off towards the chuck.

                        I think I may have a manual for this but suspect it's the same as the one on the Yahoo site, I'll check later.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by John Stevenson
                          Lewis,
                          Can't give an exact answer as it was a long time ago but seeing as it has the deep slot for the toolpost bolt I'd say that you need to release the screw plate and wind the screw out then push the slide off towards the chuck.

                          I think I may have a manual for this but suspect it's the same as the one on the Yahoo site, I'll check later.
                          Thanks very much John. When the temps warm up later today I'll venture out to the garage and see if that works. It does move fairly smoothly back and forth now that the oil has worked its way into the slide. A bit of resistance at one point around the clock with the crank, but far better than it was. I suspect it's been 10-20 years since this thing has seen any oil at all.

                          If your manual is the same as the one on the yahoo site, no need as I have that already.

                          I wouldn't mind some sort of guideline on oiling/greasing things if you have something like that kicking around. No rush.

                          Thanks for your help,
                          Lewis

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            That looks like quite a nice machine.... Did you get chucks etc with it?

                            Agree that the plate with crank must come off and the rest slides off other end. Loosen the gibs and it will be easier.

                            Looking at that, I would strongly suggest that you take ALL the slides apart and clean them up. You don't want grit, dirt, swarf or rust in there grinding away material as the slides move.

                            While oil may eventually wash it out, I wouldn't want to count on that.

                            And, I find that machines that have been left unused for years were neglected and not cleaned prior to being left unused, and usually have crud in the innards in bad places.

                            The headstock on that is likely safe, but the slides and probably some of the apron may have quite a bit of swarf build-up.

                            Lube...... way oil for the slides, manufacturer recommended oil for headstock, which is quite likely to be similar to a straight SAE 10 non-detergent. Quite often the apron uses way oil as well, some machines actually have a pump to apply it to the ways from the apron, but I have no idea on that one.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 01-22-2012, 10:53 AM.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers
                              Looking at that, I would strongly suggest that you take ALL the slides apart and clean them up. You don't want grit, dirt, swarf or rust in there grinding away material as the slides move.

                              While oil may eventually wash it out, I wouldn't want to count on that.

                              And, I find that machines that have been left unused for years were neglected and not cleaned prior to being left unused, and usually have crud in the innards in bad places.
                              +1 on this ^^^ Dont be lazy and/or skip anything.

                              Get a package of scotchbrite pads + WD40 and go to town. Make sure you get down into the "crap slot" in the bottom of all the dovetails, and pay attention to get all of the crap out of the drilled oil passages/galleries.
                              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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