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  • Bridgeport Lube Line Question

    Hi Guys,

    I have a question about a repair that I am doing on my Bridgeport. While I was changing out the leadscrew nuts, I found that all or most of the lube lines and ports were plugged with a thick black crud. I had to pull the nylon lines out of the drilled holes to clean them out. I used brake cleaner and compressed air and it worked great. Now I am trying to put things back together and am having trouble getting the nylon lines back into the holes.

    I am thinking that if I could freeze them, they would go right in but can't figure out how to freeze them.

    Does anyone have a trick for this. There are 8 lines that need to be installed.

    I also found that all of the metering valves were plugged up and was able to get all of them cleaned out with the brake clean and compressed air except one. I have been looking for a source for the metering valve locally and have not found one yet. Any sources appreciated. The Bijur # is FJB1.

    Thanks,
    Brian

    The lines:


    The metering valve:
    OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

    THINK HARDER

    BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

    MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

  • #2
    bborr,

    I am in almost the exact situation you are in except I did not remove the end of the tubing from the cast iron holes. I pretty much figured what you found out- that the re-insertion would not go well so I left that part alone.. Depending on how deep the tubing is inserted, possibly a small lead applied to the end of the tubing using an exacto knife would help?? Is it possible the lines are inserted at the factory and then a pressing/staking operation done to deform just enough to lock it in? I can't tell from the photos or from memory but from the looks of it possibly a steel ferrule over the tube an subsequently pressed into the CI?? Sorry I don't have a more constructive response. Hopefully all the knowledge here will chime in.

    Comment


    • #3
      If you really want to freeze them you can buy cans of freeze spray from electronic shops, Radio Shack might even have it. If you can't find one there get a can of dust-it from an office supply store and spray it inverted.

      But it might be easier to grab a chunk of aluminum, drill a centered on-size hole for the tubing and a couple of flats outside and slit it using a bandsaw. That should give you about .025 of squish and loads of bearing area to grip the tubing with some pliers and use them as the backing to push the tubing back into the hole.

      The meter unit you should be able to order in from MSC or some other industrial supplier (oddly I can't find them at McMaster). Failing that I've ordered them from General Bearing in LA (along with the odd tubing sizes in copper with olives and compression nuts).

      Comment


      • #4
        is that what bridgeport ways are supposed to look like?

        just talking out loud here but that press-fit for the tubing would
        have to hold up to 30psi or better (whatever your pump delivers) ..
        I'd be concerned with slitting the tube in any way.

        how hard was it to pull them out?

        I wonder if you managed to create a tapered hole in a piece
        of aluminum to sort of "swage" a taper onto the first 1/4" or
        so of the tubing if that, along with the freeze spray, couldn't
        help a bit.

        Again, hopefully someone here knows the proper installation
        method.. but just wondering aloud.

        Tony

        Comment


        • #5
          McMaster has them under Oil Metering Valves.


          HTH
          Steve.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by rythmnbls
            McMaster has them under Oil Metering Valves.
            Thanks! For some reason I wasn't able to find it in their indexing - normally their index pops what I want right up.

            Comment


            • #7
              Tony,

              Yes, that is what Bridgeport ways are supposed to look like if they are the Tibon? hard chrome ways. The part in the picture has virtually no wear. I wish they looked like that all the way across them.

              The lines pulled out fairly easily. It felt like maybe a couple of thousandths of press. I don't think they ever have a lot of pressure on them to push them out. The metering valves only let the way oil out very slowly and there should be very little restriction once it gets to the ways.

              Rkepler,

              The lines do not appear to be staked in. I my try your idea of a couple of pieces of stock with the half hole and a pair of pliers. I can get them started but can't hold them tight enough to push them in all of the way. I don't want to take a chance at damaging them.

              I will post an answer when I get it figured out. If anyone knows how it was done at the factory, I would be interested in hearing how.

              Thanks,
              Brian
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

              Comment


              • #8
                You can order from Bijur directly - $25 min order. They sell the "nylon" line also.

                If you had crud in your lines, replace the filters in the pump unit also.

                Take an old pair oi pliers and grind or drill a round groove in the jaws to "just" hold the tube. That way it will not be crushed.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Perhaps just the opposite of freezing the lines would work as some heat from a blow dryer would make them a bit more pliable and easier to push in. I know that those black plastic lines are pretty stiff, like working with copper tubing. Also maybe putting a slight champher on the hole would help too.

                  JL.......................

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What Lakeside said but we used a pair of bent tip needle nose pliers get rid of most of the tip and drill a 5/32" hole thru the bend, if you think that the jaws are going to be to hard to drill heat them red and let cool, after drilling file a little clearance in the jaws, hold them up to a light and see where they touch and relieve them there, you just want to grasp the tube not crush it, then leaving about an 1/8" to 3/16' sticking out line up straight with hole and push it in. bborr01 PM sent

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Got It

                      Gentlemen,

                      The lines are in. I had noticed that the holes in the saddle were drilled and chamfered and I think the chamfer left a small burr. I looked around for a small enough chamfer with a smaller angle on it so it would make it easier for the line to press in. No such luck.

                      Then I had a thought. How about a bearing scraper. I put the point of the scraper in the lube hole and spun it a couple of times and blew it out with compressed air. The line started and with a little coaxing, it went right in.

                      Note: when I tried to put the lines in a couple of days ago, my fingers were oily/greasy/slimy from all of the crap from way oil and coolant. I had a lot better grip once my fingers were clean. Food for thought. Patience is a virtue.

                      Saddle with bearing scraper and a couple of lines in place:


                      Brian
                      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                      THINK HARDER

                      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm really starting to hate the look of those BP ways!

                        I have one where the chrome is worn off for 1/3 on each side!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lakeside53
                          I'm really starting to hate the look of those BP ways!

                          I have one where the chrome is worn off for 1/3 on each side!
                          This one has some wear on the ways, but it is usable for now. At least it shouldn't get much wear with the lube working.

                          All the threads lately about scraping has me interested, but not to the point of doing any right now.

                          Brian
                          OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                          THINK HARDER

                          BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                          MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Glad you got those pipes in Brian...

                            BTW, some flexible pipes/hoses can be reduced in diameter by stretching and this is usually easier if it is heated first. You stretch the hose and quickly poke it through the hole before it contracts back to the original length and of course diameter, if there is space on the far side it will even expand and make a very secure fixing. Oh yes, it is much easier if the hose is overlength as it is quite difficult to stretch the end bit, if overlength you can quickly snip that bit off.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Well, I got it all put together yesterday except for the metering valve. What a difference.

                              I went from having about .060" backlash in both the X and Y axis to about .005 in the Y and a little more than that in the X.

                              The table and saddle also slide easier now that the lube ports are not all plugged up and there is fresh way oil on the ways.

                              Thankfully, the leadscrews had very little wear. The nuts on the other hand had threads that were worn to a point instead of having a flat like acme threads are suppose to.

                              I am looking forward to making some chips on it. I think this job was time well spent.

                              Brian
                              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                              THINK HARDER

                              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                              Comment

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