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  • Chuck for dividing head?

    I've had my LW dividing head for some time that I refurbed, but no chuck to go on it.

    I'm assuming an independent 4 jaw would be the most versatile for this unit.

    The threads are an odd 2-1/4 x 10tpi, not the normal 8tpi so I'll have to thread an adapter plate for any chuck. The threaded portion is under the black plastic cap.
    This unit also has a 4C collet nose and drawbar.
    I have no 4C collets either.



    I want to use this thing!
    Since I'm not spinning this at any rpm, would a cheaper chuck be adequate?

    I see Shars has a 8" independent 4 jaw plain back chuck on sale.
    Decent enough, or avoid?
    Last edited by T.Hoffman; 02-09-2012, 10:57 AM.

  • #2
    Sure you want a 4 jaw? Most of my work is round stock or hex, I put a Bison 3 jaw on the dividing head. Dialing in something in the 4 jaw at 40 to 1 rato would be very time consuming.

    Utopia would be both. A nice 3 jaw and a 4 jaw for the irregular stuff. Thinking about it I have a spare 4 jaw with no back that I should fit to the dividing head.


    Last edited by SilveradoHauler; 02-09-2012, 12:19 PM.

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    • #3
      I've got the 3.5" center height baby brother of yours. The 40:1 ratio and not being able to disengage the spindle will make dialing in very tiresome. The only concern with a cheap four jaw is if the jaws don't line up with center line of chuck, then the part would be waggling out on the end. If you use a tailstock, that is less of a problem. Can yours disengage the spindle to dial in the part? I gotta admit, I've never looked into it. I think I have the instruction and index sheet for that one if you need it.

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      • #4
        Yep, you get what you pay for in chucks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SilveradoHauler
          Sure you want a 4 jaw?
          No, I'm not sure I want a 4 jaw.
          Having not done much at all with a dividing head, I'm green at it.

          Reason I mentioned 4 jaw is that most all LW heads I've seen on Ebay with the original chucks seem to be 4jaw. Like this one:

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          • #6
            It really depends on what type of work you do. This Yuasa tilting spin dex has a 4” 3 jaw set true chuck mounted on it that works well. It also takes 5C collets.



            The 4 jaw is more versatile but takes more time and effort. The set true also takes time but once done it is faster for multiple parts.
            Byron Boucher
            Burnet, TX

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            • #7
              ...and I AM serious about finally getting this thing up and running.

              Just tonight won a decent tailstock that will work with my LW head for $41 on ebay.

              Not bad.



              Now I'm cruising trying to find some 4C collets with will work in my LW.
              The final thing will be the chuck and making the adapter plate for it.
              Last edited by T.Hoffman; 02-09-2012, 10:16 PM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Boucher
                This Yuasa tilting spin dex has a 4” 3 jaw set true chuck mounted on it that works well. It also takes 5C collets.

                Funny you post that, I was just watching one of these very things at auction....

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by T.Hoffman
                  No, I'm not sure I want a 4 jaw.
                  Having not done much at all with a dividing head, I'm green at it.

                  Reason I mentioned 4 jaw is that most all LW heads I've seen on Ebay with the original chucks seem to be 4jaw. Like this one:
                  My 6" L_W came with a nice 3 jaw on it..... I usually use it with centers anyway, so no big deal on that It is 1 1/2-8 so everything for the Logan fits it.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #10
                    Everything is relative. If you want to be super accurate you need an independent chuck. If you want simplicity of use, and can deal with a loss of accuracy, a scroll chuck is satisfactory.

                    What do you want to do?
                    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by justanengineer
                      What do you want to do?
                      There's the catch. Since I haven't had use of a dividing head, I couldn't use them in any of my projects until now.

                      Now I want to tinker, experiment, and play for a bit.
                      I know once I get into this I'll have projects this would be great for.

                      So until I get in there and play for awhile I'm not sure what I'm going to do.
                      I tend to be a very detailed guy though....

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by justanengineer
                        Everything is relative. If you want to be super accurate you need an independent chuck.
                        Or, better, you should work between centers.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

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                        • #13
                          Almost all of the large index heads I have used, including brand name Super Spacers, were equipped with 3 jaw chucks. Keep in mind these were not cheapo Chinese chucks, but fairly accurate 3 jaws. They tend to hold their precision as they are not abused or subjected to the same forces as a lathe chuck and just do not wear as much.

                          As others have said working between centers would be your most accurate method, but that is not always feasible. If your index head will free wheel a 4 jaw would be good, but cranking a 40:1 ratio around several times to dial in the work would get real old real soon.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers
                            Or, better, you should work between centers.
                            Yup. I tend to use the 4 jaw to avoid using the tailstock myself. Ive also been known to use a small faceplate upon occasion for odd work. To my way of thinking, the OP ideally would have all of the common work holding methods. Realistically, if he has the right size lathe chucks, he could make a simple spindle nose adapter to use his lathe chucks, faceplates etc on the dividing head. That would be the cheapest, easiest solution IMHO.

                            Regarding adjusting the 4 jaw, there are other methods of doing so if you cannot freewheel the head. If the head is at least semi-universal for example, simply tilt the head 90 degrees (vertical), and use an indicator in the quill of the mill.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                            • #15
                              THoffman,

                              I looked for it but perhaps I missed it... you do not mention what sort of taper (if any) the spindle of the indexer has. My guess is that it is some sort of Brown & Sharpe taper. It wo-uld be nice if it was Morse 2 or 3. In any case... I would make up a spigot with a shank for that taper in the indexer and whatever end will mount the chuck of your choice. The ideal thing, in my opinion, would be a spigot that is the same as the one on your lathe. In that way you can turn some work and transfer it back and forth between the indexer (and thus the mill) with very little extra runout. You also will have the advantage of not having to buy a new chuck and can use any of the spindle tooling that mounts on your lathe (3-jaw, 4-jaw, faceplate, driveplate, centers, etc...) Of course I am assuming you have only one lathe and you already have that tooling and it is of a scale that will match the L-W.

                              I say all this because when I bought my Vertex indexer it has the same (1-1/2-8) spindle nose as my lathe. It also has an MT2 hole in the spindle so it matches up with the MT2 tooling I have for my 10" Rockwell lathe. In this way I get maximum utility from the tooling I already have and makes it easy to swap setups between lathe spindle and indexer spindle/mill. The only tooling that will not interchange is the 4C collets for the lathe. I ended up buying a set of MT2 collets for the indexer and making up a drawbolt and socket washer so I could rotate the indexer head to all positions. The downside of using collets with a drawbolt is the indexer body has to be rotated to near horizontal to access the drawbolt.

                              -DU-
                              Last edited by Void; 02-11-2012, 12:18 AM.

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