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  • Proper Storage of Grinding Wheels

    Just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on how to properly store grinding wheels. I've heard from a few people that if a wheel is laid flat on it's side and the surface it's laying on isn't perfectly flat that over time the wheel will warp or sag. I don't think I ever had a wheel that didn't wobble from side to side a bit even when new. Most shops I've been in do store the wheels on a peg board hanging on the wall. Any thoughts???
    I think the myth is busted myself!

    JL...........

  • #2
    I couldn't find anything definitive in any of my old Norton Co. literature, other than "Protect grinding wheels when not in use. Store them safely if they are removed from the grinding machine, so they'll be ready to go to work on the next job."

    That takes "vague" to a new level, doesn't it?

    I have twelve wheels, all mounted on wheel adapters. They hang on the wall behind the grinder. It's a plywood wall to which I simply screwed-in some rain gutter stand-offs at an angle and hung up the wheels.


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    • #3
      The following are exerpts from a booklet distributed by Norton in
      its capacity as a member of the GWI.
      "Handling, Storage and Inspection of Grinding Wheels"
      Grinding Wheel Institute, 1965

      Storage
      - Straight and Tapered Wheels

      Most straight and tapered wheels are best supported on edge in racks.
      Such racks should preferably be made to provide two-point cradle support
      for the wheel to prevent rolling and with a sufficient number of partitions
      to prevent wheels from tipping over. ...

      - Thin Organic Bonded Wheels
      Thin organic bonded wheels should be laid on a flat horizontal surface,
      away from excessive heat, to prevent warpage. ...

      - Cloth Backed Thin Disks
      Cloth backed thin disks should be supported and weighted as described
      in paragraph for thin organic bonded wheels and should be stacked cloth
      to cloth and grain to grain to withstand damaging the cloth backing. ...

      - Cylinder, Cup and Saucer Wheels
      Cylinder wheels and large straight cup wheels may be stacked on the
      flat sides with corrogated paper or other cushioning material between
      them, or they may be stored in racks similar to those used for large
      straight wheels. A satisfactory method of storing large flaring cup
      wheels is to place them flat on a horizontal shelf, alternating their
      positions so that they will be stacked base against base and face
      against face. Small saucer, cup and dish wheels not having a thin
      easily damaged edge or rim may be stored on edge.

      - Small Wheels
      Small cup and other shape wheels such as plugs, cones ect., also
      small internal wheels may be stored in boxes, bins or drawers ...

      Also
      "Grinding, Honing and Polishing"
      Stan Bray; Special Interest Model Books 2009

      "Most wheels should be stored in a dry place on edge, thin
      straight-sided wheels as well as those shellac and rubber-bonded
      however should be laid down on a flat surface to prevent warping."

      As well, the remarks in grinding wheel expiry date may be of interest, too.

      .
      Last edited by EddyCurr; 02-22-2012, 12:56 AM.

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      • #4
        A current copy of Handling, Storage and Inspection of Grinding Wheels
        is available in pdf form courtesy of St Gobain / Norton.

        It has several of the same illustrations used in the 1965 publication.

        .

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        • #5
          You may have missed this thread

          Here's how I handled the problem:
          http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=51079

          Comment


          • #6
            None of those Norton documents makes any reference to wheels that are already mounted. I've been storing the mounted wheels like this for a long time with no signs of impending doom.

            Perhaps hanging on a wall like I've done isn't the right way with an unmounted wheel. When they are mounted, however, the support is not from the center bushing of the wheel but from the rim of the adapters.

            Comment


            • #7
              PixMan, what you have is what I see just about everywhere, my plans are in the works to make a board. So, I guess there is some truth to what I was told about laying wheels flat. I've stored them this way for years with no problems. Eddy, thanks for the info, I guess the mfg. has different recommendations for different type wheels.
              Gary your idea also really nice, I may consider that design as well.
              Hey............ you could solve the problem of storing smaller dia. wheels by just adding 2 more dowels below the first pair and space them closer togather to catch the smaller wheels that fall through the first set of dowels. No two wheels are ever of the same dia.

              JL..............

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              • #8
                The toolroom that I used to work in had racks that stored wheels on edge, with dividers in between them. They would fit with or without hubs. I am pretty sure some of the wheels had been in there for 20 years or better and had no problems (form wheels and such). I plan to make a small rack to go in the cabinet under my surface grinder, which will be modeled after the one in the thread started by Gary Paine, with the dowels in the bottom.

                Brian
                OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                THINK HARDER

                BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                • #9
                  I consider this to be a topic of utmost importance so for what it's worth Iv come up with my own system although I only have a couple simple 6" grinding wheels.
                  I wrote the following down years ago and it's taped and labeled with all my other precautions right after the one about organizing my sock drawer...


                  "store grinding wheels on pile of bolts underneath work bench in whatever way they land after throwing them"

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                  • #10
                    Hey PixMan....... what type of duct hose are you using for you dust collector.Couldn't help but notice it. I just get a couple different sample pieces from McMaster that are supposed to be very flexible but they are a bit stiff.
                    I've been using some of that cheap white stuff you get at the hardware store for shower fan / vents........ it's really flexible but I've watched it smolder when it gets hit with sparks. Maybe you have the right stuff.

                    JL.....................

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PixMan
                      None of those Norton documents makes any reference to wheels that are already mounted. I've been storing the mounted wheels like this for a long time with no signs of impending doom.

                      Perhaps hanging on a wall like I've done isn't the right way with an unmounted wheel. When they are mounted, however, the support is not from the center bushing of the wheel but from the rim of the adapters.
                      Presumably its because they don't want the to marr or damage the ID which wouldn't matter in your case. Clearly if its ok on edge at two points they think the delicate wheel is capable of supporting its own weight . All braces and suspenders for a careful man imo. Maybe use wood dowels in the board if you're concerned

                      '
                      .

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                      • #12
                        Just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on how to properly store grinding wheels. I've heard from a few people that if a wheel is laid flat on it's side and the surface it's laying on isn't perfectly flat that over time the wheel will warp or sag. I don't think I ever had a wheel that didn't wobble from side to side a bit even when new. Most shops I've been in do store the wheels on a peg board hanging on the wall. Any thoughts???
                        I think the myth is busted myself!
                        Laying the wheels flat won't warp them unless they are flexible to start with and the surface is irregular. My wife sells grinding wheels and the warehouse is just a bunch of shelves with all the wheel stock lying flat. That includes wheels up to 4 feet diameter although those are on a palette. To prevent any damage if you need to stack them use pieces of regular box cardboard between each wheel and under the bottom one so they don't contact anything hard. That will prevent cracking from an accidental hard knock.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          I store my thin grinding wheels flat and stacked, and my thick ones any way they fit into the storage box. However, this issue does remind me of the proper way to store vinyl LP phonograph records. They should be stored on edge, and not flat. The problem is apparently that, if stored flat and stacked, only the first one or two will actually be supported flat. The record cardboard jackets are not precisely flat , and records three or four layers up will be unevenly supported. Oddly enough, storing the records on edge does seem to keep them relatively flat , as my record collection of 50 years can attest.
                          Perhaps, because of the greater stiffness of grinding wheels, comparing them to vinyl records is not entirely valid. But, grinding wheels are heavier and more brittle too, so edge storage may be the best way for large numbers of wheels.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
                            "store grinding wheels on pile of bolts underneath work bench in whatever way they land after throwing them"
                            That's my system too. I find I can get an extra couple of points of Ra if they're buried in grinding grit...
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JoeLee
                              Hey PixMan....... what type of duct hose are you using for you dust collector.Couldn't help but notice it. I just get a couple different sample pieces from McMaster that are supposed to be very flexible but they are a bit stiff.
                              I've been using some of that cheap white stuff you get at the hardware store for shower fan / vents........ it's really flexible but I've watched it smolder when it gets hit with sparks. Maybe you have the right stuff.

                              JL.....................
                              Honestly, I don't know. It was included with the new-not-so-old-stock OE style dust collector/coolant unit that I bought from Supra Machine Tools/Klim Industrial (Acer importer/dealer) for $600.

                              BTW, after looking at Ebay photos of many of the Kent, Acer and Chevalier grinders similar to the Kent KGS-200 I have there, I noticed that every one of them had that flexible hose was severely cracked, broken or collapsed closed. To prevent that from happening to the new unit I bought, I designed a spring-suspended, rubber cradle hanger to relieve strain, keep the duct open and prevent cracking and collapse. My dad made the setup from a storm door return spring and a small sheet of 1/4" soft rubber sheet.


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