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Guess who has an Ab Arboga Maskiner milling machine and a question.

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  • Guess who has an Ab Arboga Maskiner milling machine and a question.

    The fellow emailed me yesterday, and asked if I was still interested in the mill. Turns out the guy he thought he had it sold to didn't pan out, and he had lowered the price to $250.

    We loaded it on a trailer, and it's parked behind the welding shop with a tarp over it waiting on the rain to stop. I plan to run it on the 3-phase at the school to check it out before investing in a VFD to run it at home.

    The table is coated with years of grime and a little surface rust, but I'm pretty sure there's not a ding on it. There's just a little backlash in the X and Y handles.

    My one question so far is about the fine down feed handwheel for the quill. The big handle works OK, but the fine feed handwheel just spins. He said he only used it for drilling, and had never used the fine feed.

    I suspect there's a mechanism of some sort that switches between the two, but he didn't know where it is or how it works. Can someone tell me where to look, and how to operate it?

    I'll take some pictures tomorrow to make it real.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Yes, you have to pull or push _something_. I can't remeber the exact procedure, try and push and pull on nobs and levers in the area around the feed handle. IIRC you had to wiggle things a bit also. Do you see a model number anywhere?

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    • #3
      Thinking about it I think it was the thing the normal feed lever attaches to that you pull(or push..). Sorry, can't describe it better in english...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by winchman

        My one question so far is about the fine down feed handwheel for the quill. The big handle works OK, but the fine feed handwheel just spins. He said he only used it for drilling, and had never used the fine feed.

        .
        Push the handle boss firmly to the left to engage.Pull to the right to disengage.
        Good buy btw.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the info on the downfeed. It freed up with a little effort, and works just like you said.

          Now for the pictures:









          We wired it up this morning, and it runs just fine in forward and reverse at both motor speeds in all the gears. It's really smooth and quiet, too.

          We took it apart for the trip to my house. It's really pretty simple, and the three pieces (base, column, and head) are much more manageable.

          I'm open to recommendations on a suitable VFD.
          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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          • #6
            Ouch on the rust. If I were you, I would look into the electric rust removal methods. Otherwise, you're probably going to have to have the table re-ground. It doesn't matter, really, though for the price you paid. Its all worth it.

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            • #7
              Nice machine ! Your version does seem to be the mill/drill version, so make sure you get the special ring and washer pieces to retain the MT3 milling tooling, since these machines can't accept a drawbar to retain milling cutter tooling.

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              • #8
                looks a stout bit of kit .....wouldnt worry about the rust .....it will clean up nice proibably without any pits ...cast iron is like that ...if it were steel it would be another story .

                all the best.markj

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                • #9
                  I too would not worry about the surface rust, nor would I even consider electrolysis in this instance. Most of that will come off easily with WD40 and a green Scotchbrite pad. A little elbow grease and she will be good as new.

                  For a VFD, I like to recommend a TECO FM-50 series, or one of the other brand/models these were imported under. Theyve been "made"/sold by everyone, but are actually really good quality. Having had a few "accidents" in the shop, I would highly recommend you enclose them, use a seperate control box, and be reasonably careful otherwise.
                  "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                  • #10
                    As the autobody guys say "that'll buff right out!"

                    I'm working on a mill that has just about that same amount of rust.
                    Evaporust, Scotchbrite and a wire wheel has everything nice and bright.

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                    • #11
                      This one seems about right: http://www.temcoindustrialpower.com/...es/C10003.html

                      It's priced about $100 higher than one for 220V input, but I don't have 220 in the shop. It would probably cost a lot more than $100 to get that with the permit and a licensed electrician. The downside of living in the city.
                      Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                      • #12
                        That's an interesting looking machine, Im with most of the guys on the rust thing - it usually looks worse than it really is and should clean up no problem.

                        Im thinking being gear head and all it's going to be a little "chattery" but the rest of it looks pretty practical - nice score Winchman

                        Any Idea what that little beast of burden weighs?

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                        • #13
                          Judging from hard the pieces were to move around, I'd put the weights as follows:

                          Base........ 200
                          Column.... 125
                          Table....... 100
                          Head....... 125
                          Total....... 550 pounds

                          I got it all back together today after doing a little cleaning on the table. All the pieces were taking up too much space on the floor. Next step is to take all the handles off, and put them in the beadblast cabinet.

                          What's the best way to clean up the dials on the table? They're pretty dark, and it's not easy to read the markings, but I don't want to do anything that'll make them worse.

                          Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                          • #14
                            Man, that is such a great deal. Fantastic. You're going to love that machine. And for 250 bux! I thought about getting one once, but over here in sweden you can pay ten times that.

                            Enjoy.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by winchman
                              What's the best way to clean up the dials on the table? They're pretty dark, and it's not easy to read the markings, but I don't want to do anything that'll make them worse.
                              -I would definitely use the reverse electrolysis technique. Use a low voltage and long duration, scrub the smut off with a stiff toothbrush, polish the cleaned metal with steel wool or maybe fine Scotchbrite, and it'll look good as new.

                              I would not recommend power wire brushing or sandblasting.

                              Doc.
                              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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