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  • Single-point knurling???

    Have any of you guys single point cut knurling before?

    If so, tips???

    The reason I ask is because I want to produce a deep, aggressive diamond knurl in some 17-4 pH SS. I don't have a lot of experience knurling because I haven't had the need to do it very often. . .before I have only knurled aluminum and brass, both being very soft materials the knurling was easy to do and I was only knurling for extra texture on handles. . .now I'm making some knurled rollers for a grain mill and the forming knurlers aren't producing a deep enough knurl in the SS (303 is what I practiced on) for what I want/need so I thought I would try single point cutting the knurl.

    I've produced knurls in SolidWorks using a 60* thread cutting profile and the helix and swept cut features so I figured I could do the same thing on a lathe with a threading tool and doing overlapping RH & LH threads, but it didn't work out to well. . .of course I didn't have the time to experiement with as many different TPI's as I would have liked today, but 10 TPI and 22 didn't produce the effect I was looking for. . .here's a pic of the type of knurling I would like to produce. . .

    http://www.barleycrusher.com/view_im...img=bc_rollers

    This is a commercially available version of a grain mill that is quite a bit smaller than what I am working on now.

    Thanks ahead of time for the help!

  • #2
    Problem is that knurl is like 100 start and 0.3 TPI. Really is NOT going to be fun to try and single point that.. And you'd need to make up a new gear train for your mill and drive the leadscrew instead of the spindle.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      While you might get an acceptable knurl that way it's really impractical w/o CNC, and only marginally impractical with. If you want a good consistent knurl even on difficult material you'll want a cut knurl instead of a form knurl. Note that they're used differently and a cut knurl won't cut properly in a form knurl holder. A new knurl in the right holder and you can cut a knurl on 1/16" wall brass tubing.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Black_Moons
        Problem is that knurl is like 100 start and 0.3 TPI. Really is NOT going to be fun to try and single point that.. And you'd need to make up a new gear train for your mill and drive the leadscrew instead of the spindle.
        I had not thought of that before, but it makes sense now that you bring it up. . .

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        • #5
          Originally posted by rkepler
          While you might get an acceptable knurl that way it's really impractical w/o CNC, and only marginally impractical with. If you want a good consistent knurl even on difficult material you'll want a cut knurl instead of a form knurl. Note that they're used differently and a cut knurl won't cut properly in a form knurl holder. A new knurl in the right holder and you can cut a knurl on 1/16" wall brass tubing.
          I used a straddle type form knurling tool on the 303 (and that's what I used in the aluminum and brass with good results recently). . .the nice thing is that you don't have to screw aroudn with the diameter of the work-piece and getting the tool on centerline like you do with the old-school knurling tools. . .

          . . .we also have the quick-cut cut knurling tools, but I only played with it once and didn't care for it, but I also didn't read the instructions so that's probably my fault. . .and we have brand new rollers so I will try that route as well.

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          • #6
            So if I want to produce a knurl like the one in the link I posted what would you guys suggest?

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            • #7
              Knurl

              Have you checked out a supplier like Dorian? Single pointing the part would be a nightmare.

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              • #8
                Order a set of coarse knurl wheels.

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                • #9
                  HSM's magazine published a how-to article on making a knurl cutter that Mcgyver wrote. If you have the back issues you might want to give it a look. It has been discussed on the BBS as well.
                  Last edited by dp; 02-25-2012, 10:28 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by dp
                    HSM's magazine published a how-to article on making a knurl cutter that McGyver wrote. If you have the back issues you might want to give it a look. It has been discussed on the BBS as well.
                    If it's the hand knurler then I just finished making two of them. . .minus the rollers. . .I just finished surface grinding them to color-case harden them later.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Bob Ford
                      Order a set of coarse knurl wheels.
                      What would you consider coarse?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by atomicjoe23
                        If it's the hand knurler then I just finished making two of them. . .minus the rollers. . .I just finished surface grinding them to color-case harden them later.
                        Here's the thread: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=39940

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                        • #13
                          Enco catalog #619-1607 - 14 pitch. For what you are doing a 8 pitch if you can find it.

                          Bob

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                          • #14
                            Not sure this would work but it makes sharp aggresive knurls.

                            Cut a coarse thread that will be the depth of knurl you like.
                            Move to mill with dividing head. Divide pitch of thread into circumfrence to get how many rows to cut.
                            Using a end mill so it cuts 45 degrees from center and corner of end mill cuts a 90 degree notch about same depth as bottom of your thread.

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                            • #15
                              http://www.eaglerockonline.com/index.html

                              online catalog lists a few 10 and 12 pitch

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