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Single-point knurling???

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  • #31
    Well I just ordered 7 back-issues of HSM to get the articles for the cut knurling tool and the lathe tool post grinder (all the other articles are a bonus as well). . .

    . . .So I'll be making my own cut knurling tools as soon as the back-issues show up and I'll be getting started on a lathe tool post grinder attachment for my 1906 Monarch 16"x72" lathe as well!

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    • #32
      Single Point Knurling

      Here is the tool you need:
      http://www.sharp-rite.com/custom-tools-2/knurling.html

      You will also need an extremely solid/heavey duty lathe. I have used this tool to make knurled feed rolls for Stetson Ross and Yates planers ( Sawmill/planermill).

      They work well, but you need a very rigid machine.

      Patrick

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Shuswap Pat
        Here is the tool you need:
        http://www.sharp-rite.com/custom-tools-2/knurling.html

        You will also need an extremely solid/heavey duty lathe. I have used this tool to make knurled feed rolls for Stetson Ross and Yates planers ( Sawmill/planermill).

        They work well, but you need a very rigid machine.

        Patrick
        That is a cut knurling tool, so why would you need a very rigid machine to use it?
        Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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        • #34
          It creates a lot of vibration, especially when you do the second pass to get the Diamond pattern. It works very effectively - but you need a solid machine. We have a 24" DS&G that works well .

          Patrick

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          • #35
            You don't need a solid machine with a cut knurling tool, lots less pressure and done in one pass. Peter
            The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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            • #36
              From the original post:
              "The reason I ask is because I want to produce a deep, aggressive diamond knurl in some 17-4 pH SS."

              You will need a solid machine.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Shuswap Pat
                From the original post:
                "The reason I ask is because I want to produce a deep, aggressive diamond knurl in some 17-4 pH SS."

                You will need a solid machine.
                I think I have just the machine for it. . .I will have to check the size when I get to work tomorrow, but it's an American lathe. . .I think it's in excess of 24" swing. I have used it a few times to drill 6"+ holes with a spade drill in a single pass through D2 tool steel. . .had to put the tailstock into low gear to do it, but it's a VERY solid lathe.

                I would like to be able to do this at home, but I don't know if my 1935 Southbend 420Z Toolmaker's lathe (9"x36") or 1909 Monarch 16"x72" lathe will be solid enough. The Southbend has nice ball-bearing thrust bearings, but the Monarch only has brass/bronze bushings and I've already been told not to try friction turning with it. . .I think that form-knurling 17-4 would put more pressure on the bearing than friction turning. . .I don't know about the cut-knurling though. I'm gonna try to find some time to play with the cut-knurling tool at work tomorrow (and I'll read the instruction manual this time!).

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Shuswap Pat
                  It creates a lot of vibration, especially when you do the second pass to get the Diamond pattern. It works very effectively - but you need a solid machine. We have a 24" DS&G that works well .

                  Patrick
                  Vibration while knurling? How fast are you going and what DOC and material? I ask because I have never experienced vibration in any lathe while knurling and have used a variety of materials.
                  Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                  • #39

                    Some mean pitch on the knurls that will cut!
                    Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                    • #40
                      More info on Sharp rite cut knurling tool..

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                      • #41
                        No one ever said that a diamond knurl MUST be at an angle. It is just easier to do it that way with standard rollers.

                        You could still get a diamond knurl if you first do a straight knurl and then cut a series of Vee grooves with a lathe tool. Presto; diamonds.



                        Originally posted by SGW View Post
                        I agree that cutting a diamond knurl line by line would be tedious at best. I've done a few straight knurls that way though, and it's not bad at all. If a straight knurl would suit your needs, that is eminently do-able.

                        First measure the diameter, compute the circumference, and figure out how many lines there need to be to get the increment between lines you want. When I made a replacement knob for a transit, I took off one of the remaining knobs, inked it up, and rolled it on a piece of paper so I could measure the distance between lines.
                        Once I got the number of lines I adjusted it a bit to be something that would reduce to a reasonable fraction of a turn for a dividing head (e.g. from 97 lines to 96 lines), then set it up in my dividing head and planed each line in the knob with a V tool held in the milling machine spindle, cranking the table to cut the lines. It didn't take all that long, and the results were superb,such that it's difficult to tell my replacement from the original K&E knobs.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                        • #42
                          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                          • #43
                            Rather old thread and OP never followed up with success or failure. And the sharp-rite link is broken - looks like a discontinued product. But I got to thinking outside the box, and I wonder if these rollers could be made using expanded metal wrapped around a cylinder and welded in place? The material is available in 304 stainless steel with 0.94" x 0.44" diamonds (probably too coarse), but carbon steel is available in 0.1" x 0.06" and 0.26" x 0.1" diamonds.

                            https://www.mcmaster.com/Expanded-Metal/
                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #44
                              Yeah, a standard knurl is like a 100 start, 0.3 TPI operation, but there is nothing that says you can't make a knurl with a RH 20 TPI thread and a LH 20 TPI thread - or even finer. The results will be practically the same and will be easier to do in pre-hardened material than using a knurling tool.

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                              • #45
                                I also had thoughts about using a lathe and single pointing it. It certainly would take a lot of patience, though.

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