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416 stainless and the hospital

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  • 416 stainless and the hospital

    well Ive had a lathe for three days and its already taught me who's boss.

    I was turning 416 stainless with hss ground tool. It didn't chip like regular steel. It produced long strings of turned off stock, some curly but most not. I had the machine turned off and was clearing "chips" when one string got caught on something, and sliced my finger almost to the bone. (pic available on request haha)

    my question is, since I have a large supply of almost free 416, is there a insert tool that can keep this from happening "stringing" i mean. Or is there a way to grind my hss to keep this from doing it? I have read the term chipbreaker insert, and I am thinking that this is what they prevent.....

    any help would be appreciated, from my wife especially.... appearantly she doesn't like to get get awakened to be told I'm going to the ER...

  • #2
    basically the top of the tool slopes downwards ...then hits a sharp wall at the end of the slope.

    also ...its what angle you put your tool into the work,

    the more of a rake the more the chip is less likly to break.

    this explains a lot

    http://ethesis.nitrkl.ac.in/2520/1/S...IP_BREAKER.pdf

    all the best.markj

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    • #3
      Learning from mistakes.

      Question: "my question is, since I have a large supply of almost free 416, is there a insert tool that can keep this from happening "stringing" i mean. Or is there a way to grind my hss to keep this from doing it? I have read the term chipbreaker insert, and I am thinking that this is what they prevent....."

      Yes inserts are designed to break or curl chips. You can achieve the same results with HSS. I was going to show some but I am having issues with Photo Bucket at the moment.

      Don't grab razor sharp swarf with your bare hand. If you make long stringey chips then handle them with pliers or a hook.

      I like 416 stainless. Initally I liked it because I had a free source. I now keep some in stock just because it works so well for much of what I do..
      Byron Boucher
      Burnet, TX

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      • #4
        This shows the basic concept of a HSS chipbreaker.


        You just have to experiment with size and position to fit your purpose.
        Byron Boucher
        Burnet, TX

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        • #5
          You will also find that depth of cut, rpm and feed determines how well the chip will curl even with the best chip breaker. You can have the best chip breaker in the world and if you don't have the right combination of DOC, rpm and feed the metal may still come off in a long string.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            Stainless razor swarf.. been there... I have the scars to prove it.

            On my smaller lathe 10x27, it was difficult to take enough DOC to get the chips to break or even curl tightly. On my 14x40 with aggressive cuts, no problem, but , sometimes on certain materials all I can do is get them into 1-2 inch tight springs.

            The good news for you is that annealed 416 is one of the easiest of the stainless materials to machine - essentially "free machining", so you should be able to achieve good results without too much effort. Wish I had a large free supply

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            • #7
              If 416 sent u to the ER then 304 will send u to the crematorium,

              Just some words of experience learned also from the school of hard knocks...

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              • #8
                Yea, use plyers, Or consider maybe welding gloves!

                Remember: Welding gloves are not for welding. They are for the stupid things you attempt to do 30 seconds after welding when the part has stoped glowing.

                I like my long aluminum stringers I get from my drill. I hang them up as traps. They can jump 3' out to grab passers by! (They are not sharp however and snap easily)
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info guys, and thanks for the pic Boucher, I'll try my hand at grinding a bit like that.

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                  • #10
                    The best "SwarfSnatcher" that I've found is an old pair of BBQ tongs.

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                    • #11
                      Think of it this way, you are turning some good steel. Crappy stuff doesn't have the quality or consistency to make a long string like that. Not that helps your injury......

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                      • #12
                        Shop Vac

                        Originally posted by elginrunner
                        any help would be appreciated
                        Lots of plier, tong, glove suggestions, but I can't be the only one who uses a big wet/dry shop vac... Works really well. The closest my fingers get to sharp swarf is a couple inches. It is loud, which cuts into my midnight machining time, but otherwise...

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                        • #13
                          That works fine when the chips are broken up into small pieces - but the kind of stuff he's talking about will not make it one inch past the intake nozzle, they are strong and simply will not "conform"...

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