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Bernerd Multisize Collet chuck - Lever or key operation?

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  • MikeHenry
    replied
    I have both keyed and lever-type versions of the Burnerd collet chuck for L-00 spindles. I use the keyed version, mostly because I haven't gotten around to making the clamp for the other version. I usually use it to make one offs from non-standard or rough stock on the rare occasions that I do use the Burnerd, so there isn't much incentive to use the clamped version.

    I use a lever-type 5C collet chuck far more often and prefer that for accurately sized stock and really appreciate the lever for those times, even when making one or a few items. It's just so easy and quick to pop open the collet to change the work piece, reverse it, or check it for something compared to a manual-type 5C collet chuck.

    Were there more frequent need for the Burnerd, I'd be inclined to test the lever-type version. My main concern is that I would find the lever awkward to work around, but that might not be a problem in reality.

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  • Malc-Y
    replied
    I have two Burnerd Multisize collet chucks, a KC 15 and a KC 20, both D1-6 mounts for my Colchester Triumph 2000. The KC 15 takes EC range collets up to 1 1/2" and the KC 20 takes the ED range of collets up to 2" capacity. If you buy one of these chucks, be sure to get a key with it, they are virtually impossible to find second hand and cost £75 each new!!! However a large Jacobs chuck key can be used but is not a very good fit.
    For one off jobs a key operated chuck is ideal but for repetition work, especially with a capstan attachment, a lever operated chuck is a lot quicker.
    As has been said already they will not grip anything much shorter than 1 1/2" long.
    I find that when turning anything up to 2" dia. I will always use the collets rather than the 3 jaw chuck.

    Malc.

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  • Stuart Br
    replied
    Thanks all for the feedback.
    From the information supplied, I think I had better wait for a key chuck.
    They don't come up very often, I will keep looking.
    I won't be doing volume work, the main reason for wanting collets is true concentric work holding. I will stay with dialing in the 4 jaw for now

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  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Having been running a number of chucking parts on my lathe recently, I can say with all confidence that a lever closer has its place. Manually closing collets with a key/drawbar has given me something of a repetitive strain injury. It is rather painful and has me pining for a lever closer. That said, if you are only ever going to be doing home-shop, one off type parts you may actually prefer the key. If your stock varies a lot in diameter, you will be fiddling with the lever adjustment a lot I would think. The key allows a wider range of closing with more efficiency. So, basically, what I am saying is that I believe each has its place.

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  • JCHannum
    replied
    I think the choice would depend on the intended use of the system. If it is intended to remain on the lathe for extended periods and be used for making of multiple parts ala a production run, the lever type is the best choice.

    If it is for occasional use, or onsey-twoseys, with frequent chuck/colllet/part size changes, the key type would be the better choice.

    While I have no experience with the Burnerd Multisize, I use a Jacobs Rubberflex quite frequently and am very happy with it. They share similarities in design and use. If holding stock shorter than the jaws, a plug in the rear of the collet will enhance gripping. There are limits to anything of course.

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  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by Limy Sami
    Lever operation is faster.

    Lever in the way?...... depends how you position it. ....... IIRC all I've seen have the toggle anchor drilled and tapped etc etc in to the headstock.

    IME, The Burnerd Multisize only grips well when the full length of the collet is filled.
    My Burnerd clamps to the bed, it's ex-Colchester I think & I had to make a new bed clamp for the CVA, & the lever sticks vertically upwards.

    Tim

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  • plastikosmd
    replied
    I have a key. I love these collets. I think the lever would be nice but I have no complaints regarding the key system

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  • vpt
    replied
    Love my lever closer!

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  • Limy Sami
    replied
    Lever operation is faster.

    Lever in the way?...... depends how you position it. ....... IIRC all I've seen have the toggle anchor drilled and tapped etc etc in to the headstock.

    IME, The Burnerd Multisize only grips well when the full length of the collet is filled.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernerd Multisize Collet chuck - Lever or key operation?

    Can anyone shed any light on the advantages/disadvantages of key operated or lever closing collet chucks.
    I would like to get a collet system for my Colchester lathe.
    It seems that the lever operated system is much more readily available than the key type. Is there a reason for this?
    I assume that the lever type is more complex to install and remove as the lever assembly needs clamping to the bed and addition to mounting the chuck on the spindle?
    Also does the lever get in the way?

    Any other feedback on the Burnerd multisize collet system?

    Thanks in advance for your response

    Stuart
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