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Grizzly Mill GO916

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  • Grizzly Mill GO916

    I've had larger machines in the past and quite frankly I just don't want to have to deal with all of the large and heavy things that go with a big machine. I want something that's going to be of manageable size but still do what I'm looking to do. I can't really see myself doing anthing larger than about a 1/3 scale motor (V8 Scorpion for example).

    I'd like to hear from people who've used this model of mill and how it performed for them. I expect that with the DC motor the power would be far superior to an A.C. motor of simlar size. The other thing that I was wondering about was the rigidity of the frame compared to a regular round posted mill/drill configuration.

    Thanks.
    Allans Rule: Anything worth doing is going to be a pain in the butt.

  • #2
    I think you might mean G0619

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    • #3
      Hi,

      I just went through such choices this past winter. And to help muddy the choices, I ended up choosing the G0704. Which I'm very happy with.

      During my research, I found that those have owned both the Seig x2/3 mills claim that the BF20/704 style machines are better built and are a bit more rigid. The BF20/704 types are quickly gaining popularity with the CNC conversion crowd as being inexpensive and easy to work with.

      The G0704 certainly has more x and y travel. And the same sized motor, so power for milling steels isn't a problem. But the G0619 has 3/4" more quill travel.

      I understand the desire for keeping a smaller machine. Bigger isn't always better for everyone. Good luck in your search!

      dalee
      If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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      • #4
        Looks nice, athough on a smaller mill I would want 3000rpm for the smaller endmills and such.

        Kinda sucks having no gears, while it has 100rpm lowest speed you'll have so little power as to be unable to drill a decent hole. A small boring head might help with that however if you don't mind taking awhile.
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          Did I mention....

          That I have a small streak of Dyslexia...just another little challenge to add to the hobby . Yes it was the 619 I meant.
          Allans Rule: Anything worth doing is going to be a pain in the butt.

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          • #6
            Black Moons

            You made a pretty good point about the speeds.

            I totally agree with you about the high speed, there is actually a plan I saw that allowed an accessory small motor assembly to be held in the spindle of your mill for use with the small mills and that will be on my project adgenda.

            As for the low speed, the nice thing about this mill is that it uses a D.C. motor and develops most power in a locked rotor condition. That's one of the reasons I'd be interested in choosing this over a slightly higher power A.C. unit.

            The Sherline is a pretty good example of this. With a relatively small motor I could still take cuts of 0.040" in 6061 almuminum. The problem was that the chuck would spin on the material at that kind of load.
            Allans Rule: Anything worth doing is going to be a pain in the butt.

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            • #7
              Hi,

              I think with these machines it appears that they are designed to mostly handle 1/8" to 1" HSS endmills in mild steel. So machining materials like aluminum, plastics, or composites are going to be outside of their design intentions.

              And either you will need to replace/redesign the spindle or head for high spindle speeds. There are some very good designs by people who have done such conversions on these machines. I do like the auxiliary spindle idea. It allows for easier lower spindle speeds for steels.

              dalee
              If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

              Comment

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