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My Fray rebuild - its done

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  • My Fray rebuild - its done

    Well after about a year & a half I finally finished up the rebuild of my Fray No. 7. I hauled it out of the West Virgina panhandle about 5 years ago and it had to sit while I built my shop, added a garage bay onto the house and a few other items.

    BTW, I paid $400.00 for the machine and I probably put another $400.00 in it including the new main motor. The feed motor is a old compressor motor I had on hand.

    Originally it was a 3 phase machine, but only had a 1/2 HP main motor. So I bought a single phase reversible 1 1/2 HP and made an adapter. I also replaced the feed motor with a 110V single phase motor.

    Most of the mill was there. The feed screw for the "extra" X axis had been cut off, so I had to stub it and I had to make a bearing housing for said screw.

    The most difficult item to replicate was a dial. Turning, boring, etc was straight forward, but engraving the lines was a challenge. I never mounted a rotary table on a faceplate on a lathe before, but this was the only way I could cut the lines with the equipment I had on hand.

    I did a complete tear down and striping. I sandblasted all the castings, primed them and then applied five finish coats of Rust-Oleum industrial grey paint. I also built a reverse electrolysis unit big enough to hold the table. It sure was helpful in rust removal.

    During the rebuild I did not have access to a mill, so I ended up going back to my apprentice days and laying out, sawing and drilling most of the features on the main motor adapter. Once it was partially rebuilt and usable I was able to mill some features such as a keyseat in the stubbed shaft, drilling & tapping holes for Dutch keys in the new gears and the bolt pattern in the feed motor adapter.

    Speaking of the replacement gears since I did not have a mill available I bought two gear blanks from Boston gear and modified them to fit. It turns out the feed unit was made by Bridgeport in the late 1950's as was the head for the mill. I found a BP manual online that gave me the drawings for the feed unit.

    Here's a pic

    http://i1016.photobucket.com/albums/...e/DSCN0925.jpg

    The complete album is at http://s1016.photobucket.com/albums/...ing%20Machine/

    I could not figure out how to rearrange the album pics so it is not in proper sequence.
    Last edited by Dr Stan; 03-10-2012, 12:02 AM.

  • #2
    Very nice job.

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    • #3
      Dr.Stan, an impressive rebuild!!

      Interesting project ending with a good looking mill!!

      Thanks for posting this.

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      • #4
        Nice restoration - any idea what caused all the damage? I'm curious too as to how you fitted your rotary table to your lathe like that.

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        • #5
          I've not seen one of those mills before, it's interesting the way the head is mounted and can be manipulated. Really nice job on the restoration/rebuild. Thanks for posting it here!

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          • #6
            Very impressive work.

            And I like the look of a machine that you can fit new things to if and when you need them. Nicely sculpted castings, for a vertical head for example, are all very well, but there's often no room to tap a hole to anchor a hole tapper.
            Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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            • #7
              Nice workmanship. Well done!

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              • #8
                That is a nice looking machine. Actually,I used an old Palmgren rotary table PART in the same way as you used your whole table. I had found just the top slide,with the rotary table,from a Palmgren compound type table. It had a male dovetail on the bottom. I milled that off,and had a flat bottomed,rather low profile rotary table that I could clamp in a 4 jaw chuck for indexing things in the lathe. The lathe was a 12" Craftsman at that time. I can't recall what I was indexing,but remember doing it. Still have the old Palmgren around.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dp
                  Nice restoration - any idea what caused all the damage? I'm curious too as to how you fitted your rotary table to your lathe like that.
                  I don't know why the feed screw was cut off, my guess is that it was bent at some point. I also do not know how many owners its had, so hard telling what happened to some of the parts. I do know the previous owner was acquiring some repair parts as I have an extra feed unit casting and some internal parts.

                  I mounted the RT on the lathe by using a face plate and then I indicated the center hole true to the lathe axis.

                  BTW, two of the missing parts were the handles for the overarm axis. Someone on Shop Floor Talk had replaced his BP mill table handles with ones with spring loaded fold away handles. He was kind enough to give the old handles and I was able to bore them out to use them on my Fray.

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                  • #10
                    Nice job Stan,but I thought you hated Battleship Grey?
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11
                      I love the all angle setup, and bet it comes in handy quite often. Nice mill, and definitely a nice job restoring it.
                      "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by wierdscience
                        Nice job Stan,but I thought you hated Battleship Grey?
                        I do, but I painted my 9" SB International Harvester white (sort of a cream color) and that was a major mistake. Shows dirt like you wouldn't believe so I decided maybe the decision to use grey on machine tools wasn't such a bad idea after all. At least this grey is a gloss, instead of flat like BS grey.

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                        • #13
                          I have no idea why so many machine tools get painted white from the factory these days. You just can't keep them clean,and oil stains are inevitable.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by gwilson
                            I have no idea why so many machine tools get painted white from the factory these days. You just can't keep them clean,and oil stains are inevitable.
                            It helps them look good in the catalog and on web sites. In other words, marketing.

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