Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cleaning a Machine Tool.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cleaning a Machine Tool.

    I bought an old lathe that needs some cleaning. It looks like one of those machines that has been in an old dimmly lit machine shops for the last 40 years being covered in dried up cutting oil. You guys know the type. I would really like to cover this thing is a de-greaser and then hit it with a pressure washer, but my better judgement says this probably isn't a good idea.

    What methods are you using to clean up old machinery? I will not be taking this machine to nuts and bolts. Thanks.

  • #2
    Use flat, metal blade putty knifes as scrapers, wire brush, kerosene, and ALOT of elbow grease.
    Be patient

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by KiddZimaHater
      Use flat, metal blade putty knifes as scrapers, wire brush, kerosene, and ALOT of elbow grease.
      Be patient
      That was what I was affraid of

      Comment


      • #4
        Try a number of solvents until you find the best (removes crap, but not paint) that works in your situation. I found nothing would safely cut the dried on coolant (coated thick from from other machines) on my lathe except rubbing alcohol (70% Isopropyl).

        Comment


        • #5
          I'd add nylon kitchen brushes, a hard toothbrush, and pot scrubbers such as Chore Boy. Don't forget the PPE including eye protection and nitrile or rubber gloves.

          A good degreaser such as Simple Green or Purple Power may be better than kero depending on how close to a ignition source you are working.

          Comment


          • #6
            I recently bought a Clausing lathe that was reasonably dirty, liberal application of 409 and scotchbrite pads cleaned up the painted areas pretty decent, mineral spirits and/or brakekleen for the really grundgy stuff.

            Went from this:
            http://www.tdkmotorsports.com/shoppics/ebayclausing.JPG

            To this, in fairly short order:
            http://www.tdkmotorsports.com/shoppics/clausing1.JPG

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by oxford
              I bought an old lathe that needs some cleaning. It looks like one of those machines that has been in an old dimmly lit machine shops for the last 40 years being covered in dried up cutting oil. You guys know the type. I would really like to cover this thing is a de-greaser and then hit it with a pressure washer, but my better judgement says this probably isn't a good idea.

              What methods are you using to clean up old machinery? I will not be taking this machine to nuts and bolts. Thanks.
              You could try warm water and ammonia or dawn dishing washer soap. An old tooth brush may be gentler than a scotch brite pad. When the going get's tough, I reach for WD-40. I buy it by the gallon and apply it with a plant sprayer. WD-40 is very similar to kerosene. You should wear gloves when using it, but I often don't. For super tough baked on grime, and only as a last resort, you can use braklean. This is nasty stuff that will strip off paint, so beware. A better choice (in my mind at least) is to remove the component and soak it in WD-40 or kerosene. A 10 minute soak works wonders, but the same part, same solution will work miracles in 24 hours or a week or even longer.

              Comment


              • #8
                Honestly I wouldn't worry to much about hitting it with a pressure washer if you have intent to tear down the machine right after. If I were to do it as soon as I was done with the water I would have the wd-40 can right there to coat everything as to not get the flash over rust.
                Andy

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by adamc
                  An old tooth brush may be gentler than a scotch brite pad. When the going get's tough, I reach for WD-40. I buy it by the gallon and apply it with a plant sprayer. WD-40 is very similar to kerosene. You should wear gloves when using it, but I often don't. For super tough baked on grime, and only as a last resort, you can use braklean. This is nasty stuff that will strip off paint, so beware. A better choice (in my mind at least) is to remove the component and soak it in WD-40 or kerosene. A 10 minute soak works wonders, but the same part, same solution will work miracles in 24 hours or a week or even longer.
                  +1. Do NOT use scrapers, wire brushes etc except as an absolute last resort. Also, do not expect any surfaces to become very shiny as oil has been soaking into the iron the machine's entire life, as will seep out slowly, dulling the surface long before its very bright.
                  "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    on my very grungy mill I soaked it down for a couple of days with purple power in a garden sprayer (it was on the ramp in front of my shop and I sprayed it when ever it looked dry) then I pressured washed it. took off 90% of the stuff I used wd40 and a stiff brusk for 9% that was left I'm still cleaning that last 1 % !!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by vpt
                      Honestly I wouldn't worry to much about hitting it with a pressure washer if you have intent to tear down the machine right after. If I were to do it as soon as I was done with the water I would have the wd-40 can right there to coat everything as to not get the flash over rust.
                      But.. the pressure wash will force water AND filth into in places where you will not be able to remove it with WD... pressure washing works fine if you disassemble everything, but rarely if not.

                      I've seen many lathes where the use of water based low pressure coolant ruined the apron/cross slide - the lathes were not designed for that type of operation and accumulated water rotted out the screws etc.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Enjoy: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=40459
                        Mike
                        WI/IL border, USA

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lakeside53
                          But.. the pressure wash will force water AND filth into in places where you will not be able to remove it with WD... pressure washing works fine if you disassemble everything, but rarely if not.

                          Thats why I said if he plans to tear down the machine right after.
                          Andy

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have found that one sided razorblades (the kind they use in scrapers made for removing paint from windows) work quite well for removing hardened gunk, if you lay it flat or press the side of the blade against the metal it slices the crud of easily...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              oxford, our lathes may be related... surely they know each other in any case. I'm taking a little break atm from taping stuff up and happened to catch this. First disassembled the lathe, then liberally sprayed on Krud Kutter from Lowes, really made the cleanup stage easier for me. Wiped the majority of the gunk off then decided to go ahead and paint it since... why not. Home Depot had this stuff called Citristrip, good stuff to use in enclosed or semi-inclosed areas like the garage. Anyway, brushed in on, waited about an hour took it over to the car wash... it was down to clean bare metal.

                              ...back to taping and priming...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X