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  • Stud installer?

    How do these work?

    http://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-Stu.../dp/B001DDD79Y

    Do they just bottom down on the top of the stud? Is the set screw in the top to adjust the depth and lock down on the top of stud? Once the stud is in do you hold the hex with a wrench, loosen the set screw, then spin it off?

  • #2
    The stud is screwed into the holder then you tighten the set screw to lock the stud. Once the stud is installed loosen the set screw and un-screw the holder from the stud.

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    • #3
      Not sure if you guys are thinking what I'm thinking, but what's wrong with using a double nut?
      As in installing the stud with a nut and jam nut at the top threads of the stud.
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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      • #4
        Double nuts do slip. I think that installer doohickey might work better.

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        • #5
          Double nuts do slip. I think that installer doohickey might work better.
          Removing studs can be difficult. That procedure does pose a problem when using the double nut technique. There are better methods for stud removal.

          But this tool is for installing studs. A situation were one has more control of the situation. Preferably a stud should go in finger tight.
          If not, address that problem first.

          If one is installing a stud who's jam nuts are still slipping with a reasonable amount of torque on a jam nut and lube on the threads, you have issues with your assembly procedure protocol.
          Chase the male/female threads if you must, but forcing studs into a threaded hole is not the proper process.

          To me this tool reminds of the fishing tackle displays at some sporting goods stores.
          Most of the glitter on display is designed to catch fishermen, not fish.
          Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
          Bad Decisions Make Good Stories

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          • #6
            There are also studs that are half v thread and half lag which take a whole lot more torque to screw in.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Willy
              Removing studs can be difficult. That procedure does pose a problem when using the double nut technique. There are better methods for stud removal.

              But this tool is for installing studs. A situation were one has more control of the situation. Preferably a stud should go in finger tight.
              If not, address that problem first.

              If one is installing a stud who's jam nuts are still slipping with a reasonable amount of torque on a jam nut and lube on the threads, you have issues with your assembly procedure protocol.
              Chase the male/female threads if you must, but forcing studs into a threaded hole is not the proper process.

              To me this tool reminds of the fishing tackle displays at some sporting goods stores.
              Most of the glitter on display is designed to catch fishermen, not fish.
              These are made for Harley Davidson cylinder studs. The lower part that goes into the case is a very tight class 3 thread. It prevents the stud from unthreading from the case when loosening the head bolts. If you run a standard class 2 tap in the case, you'll have problems every time you loosen the head bolts. You pretty much just ruined the cases. You can double nut, but it's a PITA. Portlandron has it right. An old trick used to be to put a ball bearing in side the head bolt and use that to torque the stud. The ball bearing puts the force on the end of the stud, not the threads. Then when loosening the head bolt, the stud will not move.
              Last edited by rjazz; 03-13-2012, 02:52 AM.

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              • #8
                I rigged something up that was similar using an extra length nut (about 3-4x standard) and a SHCS. My results are it might be handy for installing studs, but it seemed to be torque limited. I tightened the SHCS as tight as possible with a T-Handle wrench and I could get more torque before slipping using the double nut method. Not sure how well it would work on interference thread studs - guess it all depends on how tight the threads are. I was thinking of making one, but I probably won't bother now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Willy
                  Most of the glitter on display is designed to catch fishermen, not fish.
                  well they're not going to sell many two nut sets for $7 now are they
                  .

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