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Munroe effect cone testing.

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  • Munroe effect cone testing.

    Did a shot with the new aluminum cone. Its 5”base and 7” tall cones. We used sec80 pipe for the charge at 10” tall. The charge was 7# of our binary and we did not use a standoff ‘we wanted to establish a base line for the standoff. Target was 11”X 3” burnout of mystery metal and three other burnouts of 1 ½ “thick stacked underneath. Knocked the hell out of them the shot put them 18” in the ground. Strange it only penetrated the top 3” burnout and the next one was relatively untouched. A standoff will help penetrate the rest of the plats. It’s interesting to see the outer edge of the hole full of holes and dents. Shows wear the lower part of the cone didn’t have time to collapse and fit in the hole.The hole in the center is just over 2” wide. We also cracked the plate all the way threw on one side.



    Last edited by jeremy13; 03-15-2012, 10:37 PM.

  • #2
    ..............wow..............

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    • #3
      Your gonna clean that up with a boring bar right?
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        I was thinking of cutting it in half with the band saw. Or at least trying; wonder how hard it is now. Think it work hardened any? It only got hit once.

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        • #5
          Please send 100# for further testing. I'm sure you need northern data to verify the results.

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          • #6
            Like to see what it can do with a proper stand off.Keep posting about it.Even if none of us will need this information...I hope

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            • #7
              And I thought my BP golf ball mortor was fun!

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              • #8
                That's really something (else?)!!

                I wanted to see what it was all about:

                http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&suge...w=1280&bih=523

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaped_charge

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosi...med_penetrator

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                • #9
                  At least some people can have fun at work.
                  The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                  Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                  Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                  • #10
                    Not machinist related and
                    not anything any of us
                    can relate to.

                    Anyone can destroy things.
                    Machinists fight against entropy.

                    I'm not feeling crabby, just saying.

                    --Doozer
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Jeremy,
                      Keep the info coming. I never expect to use the knowledge, but who knows? Nonetheless, I find it compellingly interesting.
                      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Doozer
                        Not machinist related and
                        not anything any of us
                        can relate to.

                        Anyone can destroy things.
                        Machinists fight against entropy.

                        I'm not feeling crabby, just saying.

                        --Doozer
                        Oh - perhaps not.

                        The "explosive forming" technique has been around a long time:

                        http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&suge...0&bih=785&bs=1

                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Explosive_forging

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                        • #13
                          Interesting! Do you get the same penetration with an Aluminum cone as you would with a copper cone? Back in the day ( a long time ago) most of the Monroe effect munitions I saw used a copper cone. We did get a bunch of cratering charges at one time but I am not sure what they used for the penetrator.

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                          • #14
                            The US Army had two cratering charges that I recall. The smaller, about 15 lbs I think, used a glass cone. It was supposed to produce a much cooler hole, so that a satchel charge could be added without waiting an hour or so for the slug to cool.
                            Loading a hot hole could be VERY career-limiting!
                            Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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                            • #15
                              Fun stuff. I did quite a bit if unofficial experimenting when I was young. Even had a bunker set up with electrical detonator system in the back field. I had access to my dad's science lab store room back when he had chemicals and elements from A to Z. I was pretty careful and still have all my fingers. I came up with several "standardized" designs including one that used a regular CO2 cartridge as the casing. It could cleanly break six regular building bricks in half when stacked 3 deep on each side. That one used 1/8" standard waterproof dynamite fuse which I could buy by mail order. It burned a very predictable 5 seconds per inch.
                              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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