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Tip: Analog Clock Face as a Protractor

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  • Tip: Analog Clock Face as a Protractor

    The realization that an analog clock face can serve
    as a protractor recently dawned on me in a moment of
    need. No doubt this will not be news to most, but
    to the few who, like me, have led a cloistered life,
    it may prove useful at some point.

    Every minute (units of time, not angular units) on
    an analog clock face represents 6؛.

    Need to check the 132؛ angle on a drill bit for hard
    material, this works out to 22 minutes past the hour
    on a clock face.

    Need to demonstrate to someone how to position a
    welding gun at an inclination of 15؛, this works out to
    2-1/2 minutes past the hour.

    .

  • #2
    Or you could just buy the proper tool for the job you're trying to do...
    Keith
    __________________________
    Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

    Comment


    • #3
      Angle Clock

      Still...that is a good way to visualize or estimate. Sometimes a visual aid helps in the design process.

      Comment


      • #4
        Not something I'm likely to use in the shop, but definitely a handy visual aid and reference.

        One of those things that are so obvious...after someone points them out.

        Dave Cameron

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        • #5
          Well, "Fighters at nine o'clock, high!" worked better than "270 degrees, high" in WWII. There must be something to it.
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          Make it fit.
          You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

          Comment


          • #6
            Speaking of WW2.

            I recall an article in Model Engineer magazine. The writer was in need of a dial gauge, but could not buy one due to restrictions. He converted a small alarm clock into a dial gauge--- it apparently worked well. I can only imagine him thinking " The needle is moving from 2 o clock to 6 o clock so middle must be 4 o clock" If he kept the original clock face!!! Maybe I had better " Clock off " now with the thought. How lucky we are to have so much tooling. Regards David Powell.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by EddyCurr
              The realization that an analog clock face can serve
              as a protractor recently dawned on me in a moment of
              need. No doubt this will not be news to most, but
              to the few who, like me, have led a cloistered life,
              it may prove useful at some point.

              Every minute (units of time, not angular units) on
              an analog clock face represents 6؛.

              Need to check the 132؛ angle on a drill bit for hard
              material, this works out to 22 minutes past the hour
              on a clock face.

              Need to demonstrate to someone how to position a
              welding gun at an inclination of 15؛, this works out to
              2-1/2 minutes past the hour.

              .
              The principle is sound enough.

              I used to use a transparent "school (type)" protractor as well and still do when required.

              Here are some similar ones (which are more correctly called bevel gauges):

              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Q601

              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M970

              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M978

              A surprisingly good and accurate (cheap) protractor:





              And this strange-looking but very useful protractor which is supposed to be accurate to 2 minutes instead of the usual 6 minutes. Once I had it sorted out and got the hang of it it was very useful but mainly stays in its box:



              http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...rotractor2.jpg

              Comment


              • #8
                Due to the internal clock gearing, It's a good useable thought. No doubt somewhere on the net there's a good example of an accurate 360 degree dial that could be resized to the correct dimension and printed off. Then just apply it to the clock face.

                You'd need to be quick though. That second hand doesn't give you a lot of time for accurate setups

                Depending on the actual accuracy levels needed? It would be ok for something like welding or maybe woodworking. It's obviously not intended as something to replace a sine bar and gage blocks.

                Pete

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                • #9
                  A wristwatch is handy when your lost too [not a digital one!]
                  Or so mr Bear Gryls says, i use satnav myself!
                  regards
                  mark

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And B Grylls esquire is no more!!

                    http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&outp...w=1920&bih=785

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I guess you could use the compass rose from a binnacle;


                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binnacle

                      http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&suge...w=1920&bih=785


                      Compass rose:

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        they're a pita to maneuver into position though with the boat still attached.

                        I'm wondering if that thread was St Paddy's day inspired....maybe too much green beer? A clock as a protractor? ok.

                        I say splurge $12 on one of these.

                        http://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-.../dp/B00004T7TC

                        Have more green beer and come up with something better
                        .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          [QUOTE=Mcgyver]
                          I say splurge $12 on one of these.

                          http://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-.../dp/B00004T7TC

                          They do work well but have no vernier (mostly) and any excessive clearance in the pivot pin won't add to accuracy nor will "eye-balling" between those small degree calibtations.

                          They need to be checked - and perhaps set - against a good protractor periodically.
                          Last edited by oldtiffie; 03-18-2012, 06:43 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            While I would not use a clock as a compass, it will make a nice aid when I'm trying to visualize a particular angle. I've been looking at a clock face every day all of my life. In grade school I studied it every minute or two all day long.


                            Till now, I could only visualize 45 degree increments. Now I can accurately visualize 30 degree increments too.

                            Thanks


                            Dan
                            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by uncle pete
                              Due to the internal clock gearing, It's a good useable thought.
                              In proposing the tip, the intention was that a relationship between points
                              on the 'compass' be visualized, not that the clock hands serve as
                              indicators. On the analog clocks I am familiar with, the hour hand
                              advances as the minute hand proceeds through its revolution.

                              My thanks to all who suggested that I acquire this or that instrument. I
                              have several means of measuring angles to varying degrees of accuracy
                              as befits the task. It is just that I didn't happen to have any of these at
                              hand when a need arose. In a similar situation (and if analog clocks have
                              not become obsolete) this approach for approximating an angle could be
                              useful for others.

                              Originally posted by oldtiffie
                              And this strange-looking but very useful protractor which is supposed
                              to be accurate to 2 minutes instead of the usual 6 minutes.
                              I believe that is a variation on what I know here as a Universal Bevel
                              Protractor.

                              I don't believe I've posted about it here before but I think you might
                              be interested in my Newbould Model 100 Indexer. Designed such that
                              it has an accuracy of 30 arc seconds.


                              The inventor, RJ Newbould is a moderator at PM. A thread he began
                              about innovation
                              became a case study featuring the Newbould Indexer
                              - very rewarding to read.

                              In the lower photo there is an empty pocket on the right side of the
                              instrument case intended for storage of a level, missing when I bought
                              the instrument. I have since had the exceptionally good fortune to
                              acquire a correct NOS replacement. The 'staple' portion of the hasp
                              that belongs on the front of the case is off to one side, out of the picture.

                              .

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