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How would you fix this

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  • How would you fix this

    I am an electronics tech, not a machinist. I have access to a lathe and mill, but very little hands on experience.

    what we have here is a CV flange from a VW Thing. this lets me use high angle CV joints on my Baja bug. there is a small chunk missing:







    So I assume I build up the missing bit by welding to it, then take it down with the lathe. will the fact that it only takes up 20 degrees of arc cause problems when the welded on part slams into the lathe bit? should I grind it down first, or mill it on the rotary table?

  • #2
    That part looks cast iron. Welding to build up cast iron usually doesn't work well from what I've heard. If you can tell us for sure what it is, some of the pundits here might have more opinions.

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    • #3
      I only know that a magnet sticks to it, but I will ask at the VW forum. I don't think cast iron splines would hold up to a mighty VW engine very long.

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      • #4
        That's cast aluminum and probably has some magnesium in it, so you need to find someone who is very good at TIG welding.

        Once it is built up put it in a lathe and indicate it true. You'll have an interrupted cut, but as long as you're using a properly ground cutting tool and have it mounted securely there should not be a problem. Since you say you have a limited amount of machining experience I recommend getting help from an experienced machinist as I'm sure they don't just give these away.

        On edit. OK so it's not aluminum. Probably not cast iron either, but cast steel. Just what does this recess do? Simply locate another part of the assembly? Act as a seal? Brazing may be the right choice if the area in question is not subjected to a lot of stress.

        BTW, how was it damaged? Did someone drop it?
        Last edited by Dr Stan; 03-16-2012, 06:24 PM.

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        • #5
          I think it will be fine the way it is. It looks to be mostly for alignment not structure. The bolts are what holds it in place. I say use it as is.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by macona
            I think it will be fine the way it is. It looks to be mostly for alignment not structure. The bolts are what holds it in place. I say use it as is.
            +1 if vibration is an issue grind it back smooth and do the same on the other side to match.
            .

            Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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            • #7
              the lip is just there to keep the CV joint centered while you bolt it up. I could just grind down the other side to keep it balanced.

              standard VW beetle flanges are $15 a pair anywhere but genuine German Thing flanges are closer to $200. everybody wants them for their baja bug.

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              • #8
                The poor step child of the Porsche family, the 914, has cast steel flanges. The 914 is labled a Volkswagen. These are likely off the same manufacturing process. IME they are quite weldable. Weld um up and turn em down in the lathe. done. Ta da.
                Last edited by 914Wilhelm; 03-16-2012, 07:47 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by macona
                  I think it will be fine the way it is. It looks to be mostly for alignment not structure. The bolts are what holds it in place. I say use it as is.
                  I'm with Macona.
                  I know that part and there will not be a balance issue either.
                  Mike

                  My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                  • #10
                    Yes, leave it. If you're worried about "looks", JB Weld and a file.

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                    • #11
                      Don't worry about it, use as is, function will not be compromised.
                      James Kilroy

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                      • #12
                        Yes, leave it. If you're worried about "looks", JB Weld and a file.
                        we have a winner. I have a philosophy: If it takes less time to do it that it does to explain why you didn't, just do it. I don't have the patience for repeated explanations, but I do have the patience for this.

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                        • #13
                          Not a real issue with either strength or balance, but -- someone ran it loose and that's how the damage happened - so I would really check the bolt holes for being wallowed out and oval and might use a locktite on them if they show any signs of this.

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