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  • New to me mill

    A while back I posted asking for some help for manuals for a KBC Mill that I purchased. Got a lot of help and I thank you. Well, here are the before and after photos of the mill. I'm now just about ready to go.

    BEFORE:



    AFTER (I still have to put on the leveling feet and remove it from the home made dolly):



    Last edited by Xringshooter; 03-20-2012, 07:50 PM.
    Ron
    USAF Ret. (E-8)

  • #2
    Very nice cleanup. Looks like it was hardly used.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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    • #3
      Looking Nice. You've done a nice job on it. I have the identical mill. Mine has a nameplate from 1978.

      Yours is in nicer shape than mine, but I've added a 3 axis DRO and a 2 HP, 3 PH motor with VFD to mine.

      The only thing I wish it had would be a ram to extend the Y axis a bit for the larger pieces.

      Now if only I could match that paint.



      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #4
        Dan,
        Mine is from 1979 according to the s/n and name plate. Mine will mainly be used for gunsmithing functions right now so hand cranking the feeds is fine for me. I just need to hoist it up to put the leveling feet on, get it level and align everything.

        Oh, I also forgot to say how much it cost me. I got the mill, a bunch of collets, 6 different vises, 30 or so cutters, a complete step block and clamp set, and the Craftsman tool box that you can see to the left of the mill for, get ready, the whooping sum of $450. It was part of a home shop of a engineer that used to work where I work. He died about 6 months ago (at 83 or 84) and his widow wanted everything gone. She didn't want to mess with an auction or a sale, so we got first shot at everything.
        Last edited by Xringshooter; 03-21-2012, 12:26 PM.
        Ron
        USAF Ret. (E-8)

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        • #5
          That is a great deal. Might even say it was a steal.

          Mine was $650, and another couple hundred to get it home. The only extras I got was an old vise and set of hold-down clamps. Even so, I was happy to get it.

          It's a really nice size for a garage. It's low enough to get through the doors and sturdy enough to do fairly aggressive work.

          I know mine is around 1000 pounds, but never weighed it. Do you have the weight on yours?

          Dan
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            The weight on mine is 960 lbs. I have a 1 ton chain hoist mounted above it to raise it so I can put the leveling feet on. Then I'll set it down where I want it. I'll have do some rearranging so I have access to all sides of it. I have no doubt that it will do everything I need to do. I'll probably spend more on dovetail cutters than on the machine .

            A friend helped me move it so it didn't cost me anything. His Dad owns a farm and they have what looks like an engine hoist on steroids. It comes apart so you can set it up almost anywhere. It can lift 2 tons 48" vertically. We loaded the mill on a dual axle trailer to get it to my place. Then we backed it into the garage, set up the hoist, lifted it about 2 inches and drove the trailer out from under. We set the mill back on the dolly that it came with (the hard rubber wheels were flattened by all the weight on them for so long) and pushed it into position.

            Probably the hardest part was taking the table off, it was HEAVY. But everything cleaned up real good. The only casualty was the lamp on the left side, the wiring was brittle from being old so I took it off and wired a plug there. I'll get a good magnetic mount lamp that I can position wherever I need it.

            The only thing about that mill is the poor documentation, which is what brought me to this forum (for info). I got a lot of good links and info and now I think I have enough to get me through any problems I might have. Even though my main uses will be in the gunsmithing arena, I have already picked up a lot of good info here that will help me if I do other projects.
            Ron
            USAF Ret. (E-8)

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            • #7
              Very nice job on the cleanup Ron. Lots of dovetail cutters eh? I take it you are going to be doing a lot of iron sight installations?

              For what you have in the machine you can't go wrong. I wish I could run into those kinds of deals.

              I got tired of fighting a machine light always being in the way, and cracking my head on it when trying to get a good look at work on the table. I put up a set of household trac-lights on the overhead joists above my mill. You can slide the lights back and forth on the rail and swivel them to point them anywhere you want. Four of those little halogen lights flood the entire table with light. Just another option to consider....

              Congrats on "new" tool!

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              • #8
                Highpower,
                I'm starting to get a lot more requests for putting replaceable sights on GI model .45s, thus the dovetail work.

                The track lighting system I hadn't thought about. Thanks. Right now I have a 2 bulb fluorescent fixture I put up when we built the garage. That will come down. I have extra track and lights from when we redid the kitchen lighting a few years ago, I guess I have another weekend project to write down in my to do book.
                Ron
                USAF Ret. (E-8)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Xringshooter
                  The weight on mine is 960 lbs. I have a 1 ton chain hoist mounted above it to raise it so I can put the leveling feet on.

                  Thanks Ron! Mine matches yours in every detail, so I'll take that weight as gospel. I've been wondering about the real weight, just in case I ever need to lift it. I've moved it using the technique of rolling pipes underneath.

                  I made 3 inch wide x 3/4 inch tall aluminum pucks as feet. I rounded the ends of the bolts that go in the holes at each corner. A dimple in the middle of the puck keeps the bolt centered. So far it's worked out for me. Real leveling and vibration damping feet would have been better. Oh Well.

                  The machine was also sold as a JET import, model jtm-830 or the Phoebus PBM-AIS.

                  Again,

                  Thanks.

                  Dan
                  Last edited by danlb; 03-23-2012, 08:58 PM.
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Congratulations and that is a "STEAL" for only $450.00 with everything!!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Xringshooter
                      Right now I have a 2 bulb fluorescent fixture I put up when we built the garage. That will come down. I have extra track and lights from when we redid the kitchen lighting a few years ago, I guess I have another weekend project to write down in my to do book.
                      Do yourself a huge favor, Buy yourself at least 2 2-bulb 4' T8 fixtures for every 10'x10' of shop area you have. The fixtures are about $20~30 each if you look for the cheapest ones. And consider planing for more. Bright light is wonderful and will truly help improve your accuracy. Move any T12 fixtures to somewhere you never turn them on, or get rid of them.

                      Also go for the better spectrum bulbs. Saving money on lighting will cost you in how happy you are in your shop.
                      Last edited by Black_Moons; 03-23-2012, 10:08 PM.
                      Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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