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What do you guys do with a rotary table?

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  • What do you guys do with a rotary table?

    Got a new toy today. Looking for both common and creative uses for it so I feel better about my purchase. What do you guys do with 'em?

    8" Phase II horizontal/vertical rotary table.


  • #2
    I have a smaller one, I made some indexing plates for it and used it to teach myself how to make spur gears. I have also used it to cut circular channels in stock with a ball endmill (to accept an o-ring).

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    • #3
      This is what you do with a rotary table.

      -And a subscription to Digital Machinist. The clock is the subject of the current and upcoming issues in my Mechatronist column.

      Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
      ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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      • #4
        Not having an excess of disposable income, I'm aware of what I'm going to use something for before I buy it.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Optics Curmudgeon
          Not having an excess of disposable income, I'm aware of what I'm going to use something for before I buy it.
          I don't have any excess income either, in fact this purchase (as with a lot of my purchases) almost broke me. I have had the need for one in that past, just not at the moment. I now have one for when I need it again. I use these tools for my sole income. Not having the right tool when needed is a big deal. I told myself I would buy one when it was on sale and a 20% code was available. The stars aligned for St. Patrick's so I ordered it.

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          • #6
            Besides Gears, you can do great handwheels

            Rich



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            • #7
              Rotary Table

              Also, for recreation you can stand on it and have SWMBO crank you around in circles until you get dizzy and fall off.

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              • #8
                Rich: beautiful.

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                • #9
                  Weston- Does that clock use magnets instead of gear teeth? At least, that's what the pressed-in circular things look like to me.

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                  • #10
                    10" horizontal/vertical optional use as lifting weight for back re-hab.

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                    • #11




                      --Doozer
                      DZER

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by adatesman
                        Weston- Does that clock use magnets instead of gear teeth? At least, that's what the pressed-in circular things look like to me.
                        Yep. Neodymium Magnets. The whole thing is then driven by a purpose-built three phase variable reluctance stepper motor. 60 steps/revolution, one second per step. Basically a "quartz" movement.
                        Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                        ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Weston Bye
                          Yep. Neodymium Magnets. The whole thing is then driven by a purpose-built three phase variable reluctance stepper motor. 60 steps/revolution, one second per step. Basically a "quartz" movement.
                          That would make it one of the best digital representations of an analog clock that I've ever seen!

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                          • #14
                            They make drilling bolt circles a breeze.
                            Milling ovals.
                            Milling O-ring grooves.
                            Milling radiuses.
                            Mount horizontally with a tailstock, and you have a 4th axis.
                            To endmill keyways in shafts.
                            Drill holes in shafts.
                            Mill hexes, squares, flats on shafts.
                            You can use them for lots of fun stuff.
                            Last edited by KiddZimaHater; 03-21-2012, 06:36 PM.

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                            • #15
                              One problem with most rotary tables is that they are calibrated in degrees-minutes-seconds (d:m:s) whereas most calculations for using a rotary table are in decimal format ie 236.486 degrees.

                              Conversion from decimal degrees to d:m:s seconds requires conversion which can be tricky - and if got wrong and used on the rotary table - expensive or a thorough PITA.

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